Google Code Jam

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Google Code Jam
Google Code Jam.gif
StatusActive
FrequencyAnnually
CountryWorldwide
Years active2003-
Inaugurated2003
Attendance27,170 (2016)
Budget$15,000 for winner, smaller prizes for runners-up
Patron(s)Google
Websitehttps://code.google.com/codejam/

Google Code Jam is an international programming competition hosted and administered by Google.[1] The competition began in 2003 as a means to identify top engineering talent for potential employment at Google.[2] The competition consists of a set of algorithmic problems which must be solved in a fixed amount of time. Competitors may use any programming language and development environment to obtain their solutions. From 2003 to 2007, Google Code Jam was deployed on Topcoder's platform and had quite different rule. Since 2008 Google has developed their own dedicated infrastructure for the contest.

Starting from 2015, Google also runs Distributed Code Jam, with the focus on distributed algorithms.[3] This is run in parallel with the regular Code Jam, with its own qualification and final round, for a top prize of $10,000, but is only open for people who qualify to Round 2 of Code Jam (up to 3000 people).

Several Google Code Jam problems have lead to academic research.[4]

Past winners[edit]

Google Code Jam[edit]

Tournament Finals location Competitors 1st place 2nd place 3rd place
2018 Toronto, Canada ? Belarus Gennady Korotkevich Poland Kamil Debowski Japan Makoto Soejima
2017 Dublin, Ireland[5] 25,289 Belarus Gennady Korotkevich Russia Konstantin Semenov Russia Vladislav Epifanov
2016 New York City, New York, United States 27,170 Belarus Gennady Korotkevich[6] Philippines Kevin Atienza Russia Egor Kulikov
2015 Seattle, Washington, United States 23,296 Belarus Gennady Korotkevich Japan Makoto Soejima South Africa Bruce Merry
2014 Los Angeles, United States[7] 25,462 Belarus Gennady Korotkevich Russia Evgeny Kapun China Yuzhou Gu
2013 London, United Kingdom 21,273 Belarus Ivan Metelsky[8] Ukraine Vasil Bileckiy Russia Vladislav Isenbaev
2012 New York City, United States 20,613 Poland Jakub Pachocki United States Neal Wu Slovakia Michal Forišek
2011 Tokyo, Japan 14,397 Japan Makoto Soejima Belarus Ivan Metelsky Poland Jakub Pachocki
2010 Dublin, Ireland 12,092 Russia Egor Kulikov Netherlands Erik-Jan Krijgsman Russia Sergey Kopeliovich
2009 Mountain View, California, United States 8,605[9] China Tiancheng Lou China Zichao Qi Japan Yoichi Iwata
2008 Mountain View, California, United States[10] 7,154 China Tiancheng Lou China Zeyuan Zhu South Africa Bruce Merry
2006 New York City, United States ? Russia Petr Mitrichev China Ying Wang Russia Andrey Stankevich
2005 Mountain View, California, United States ? Poland Marek Cygan[11] Netherlands Erik-Jan Krijgsman Russia Petr Mitrichev
2004 Mountain View, California, United States ? Argentina Sergio Sancho United States Po Ruh Loh United States Reid Barton
2003 Mountain View, California, United States ? Sweden Jimmy Mårdell Canada Christopher Hendrie Russia Eugene Vasilchenko

Distributed Code Jam[edit]

Tournament Finals location Competitors 1st place 2nd place 3rd place
2018 Toronto, Canada ? Poland Mateusz Radecki Philippines Kevin Atienza Poland Tomek Czajka
2017 Dublin, Ireland 3,000 United States Andrew He Russia Evgeny Kapun Netherlands Erik-Jan Krijgsman
2016 New York City, New York, United States 3,000 South Africa Bruce Merry China Yuzhou Gu Czech Republic Filip Hlasek
2015 Seattle, Washington, United States 3,000 South Africa Bruce Merry Poland Marcin Smulewicz Taiwan Ting Wei Chen
Google Code Jam structure (2018). Numbers denote how many people advance to the next round. Colors denote format of the competition: yellow – you run your code locally and submit results and the source, blue – you submit your code and Google runs it in a distributed environment.

Results by country[edit]

Country 1st place 2nd place 3rd place
Belarus Belarus 6 1 0
China China 2 3 1
Russia Russia 2 2 7
Poland Poland 2 1 1
Japan Japan 1 1 2
Argentina Argentina 1 0 0
Sweden Sweden 1 0 0
United States USA 0 2 1
Netherlands Netherlands 0 2 0
Canada Canada 0 1 0
Ukraine Ukraine 0 1 0
Philippines Philippines 0 1 0
South Africa South Africa 0 0 2
Slovakia Slovakia 0 0 1

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dyer, J.; Gregersen, H.; Christensen, C.M. (2011). The Innovator's DNA: Mastering the Five Skills of Disruptive Innovators. Harvard Business Review Press. p. 196. ISBN 978-1-4221-4271-4. Archived from the original on 5 August 2018. Retrieved 30 July 2018.
  2. ^ Lowe, J. (2009). Google Speaks: Secrets of the World's Greatest Billionaire Entrepreneurs, Sergey Brin and Larry Page. Wiley. p. 284. ISBN 978-0-470-50124-5. Archived from the original on 5 August 2018. Retrieved 5 August 2018.
  3. ^ Ghoshal, Abhimanyu (11 March 2015). "Registration for Google's Code Jam 2015 is Now Open". The Next Web. Archived from the original on 4 December 2016. Retrieved 30 July 2018.
  4. ^ Dymchenko, Sergii; Mykhailova, Mariia (2015). "Declaratively solving tricky google code jam problems with prolog-based ECLiPSe CLP system". Roceedings of the 30th Annual ACM Symposium on Applied Computing: 2122–2124. arXiv:1412.2304. doi:10.1145/2695664.2696032. ISBN 978-1-4503-3196-8. Retrieved 4 August 2018.
  5. ^ Cheong, Ian Miles (13 August 2017). "Google Code Jam Finalists Are All Men For 14th Year in a Row". The Daily Caller. Archived from the original on 8 January 2018. Retrieved 30 July 2018.
  6. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 1 November 2016. Retrieved 5 August 2018.
  7. ^ Dickey, Josh (16 August 2014). "Belarus 18-Year-Old Wins Google's Code Jam on His First Try". Mashable. Archived from the original on 30 December 2017. Retrieved 30 July 2018.
  8. ^ Barreiro, Victor Jr. (24 June 2014). "Filipino engineer tops Southeast Asia in Google Code Jam". Rappler. Archived from the original on 1 August 2017. Retrieved 30 July 2018.
  9. ^ A New Learning Paradigm: Competition Supported by Technology. Centro para el Desarrollo de las Comunicaciones de Castilla y Leon (CEDETEL). 2010. p. 8. ISBN 978-84-937580-3-5. Retrieved 5 August 2018.
  10. ^ Reardon, Marguerite (29 September 2008). "Google selects Code Jam finalists". CNET. Archived from the original on 29 June 2018. Retrieved 30 July 2018.
  11. ^ Informationweek. CMP Publications. 2005. p. 77. Archived from the original on 5 August 2018. Retrieved 5 August 2018. Warsaw University student Marek Cygan got noticed by entering the search-technology company's third annual computer-programming competition—the 2005 Google Code Jam – and scoring the $10,000 grand prize, beating 14,500 ...

External links[edit]