Google I/O

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Google I/O
Google IO Logo.png
Date(s) May - June (2-3 days)
Begins 7-8AM
Ends 3-10PM
Frequency Annual
Venue
Location(s) 2008–2015: San Francisco, CA, USA
2016-2017: Mountain View, CA, USA
Founded 28 May 2008
Most recent 17 May 2016[1]
Next event 17 May 2017
Participants 5000 (est.)
Organized by Google
Website
google.com/io
Google I/O 2008

Google I/O (simply I/O) is an annual developer conference held by Google in San Francisco, California. I/O showcases technical in-depth sessions focused on building web, mobile, and enterprise applications with Google and open sources such as Android, Chrome and Chrome OS, APIs, Google Web Toolkit, App Engine, and more.

I/O was inaugurated in 2008, and is organized by the executive team. "I/O" stands for input/output, as well as the slogan "Innovation in the Open".[2] The event's format is similar to Google Developer Day.

Sundar Pichai at Google I/O 2015

Conferences[edit]

I/O
Year Date Location Announcements Hardware Information
2008 May 28 - 29 Moscone Center Android

App Engine

Bionic

Maps API

OpenSocial

Web Toolkit

None Speakers were:

[3]

2009 May 27 - 28 AJAX APIs

Android

App Engine

Chrome

OpenSocial

Wave

Web Toolkit

HTC Magic Speakers were:
  • Aaron Boodman
  • Adam Feldman
  • Adam Schuck
  • Alex Moffat
  • Alon Levi
  • Andrew Bowers
  • Andrew Hatton
  • Anil Sabharwal
  • Arne Roonman-Kurrik
  • Ben Collins-Sussman
  • Jacob Lee
  • Jeff Fisher
  • Jeff Ragusa
  • Jeff Sharkey
  • Jeffrey Sambells
  • Jerome Mouton
  • Jesse Kocher

[4]

2010 May 19 - 20 APIs

Android

App Engine

Chrome

Enterprise

Geo

OpenSocial

Social Web

TV

Wave

HTC Evo 4G

Motorola Droid

Nexus One

Speakers were:
  • Aaron Koblin
  • Adam Graff
  • Adam Nash
  • Adam Powell
  • Adam Schuck
  • Alan Green
  • Albert Cheng
  • Albert Wenger
  • Alex Russell
  • Alfred Fuller
  • Amit Agarwal
  • Amit Kulkarni
  • Amit Manjhi
  • Amit Weinstein
  • Andres Sandholm
  • Angus Logan
  • Arne Roonmann-Kurrik
  • Bart Locanthi
  • Ben Appleton
  • Ben Chang
  • Ben Collins-Sussman

[5]

2011 May 10 - 11 Android

Chrome and Chrome OS

Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1

Series 5 Chromebook

Verizon MiFi

The afterparty hosted Jane's Addiction.

[6][7][8][9]

2012 June 27 - 29 Android

Chrome

  • 310 million users announcement
  • Chrome for Android is stable
  • iOS app

Compute Engine

Docs

  • Offline editing

Drive

  • App for iOS
  • SDK (v.2)

Glass

Gmail

  • 425 million users announcement

Google+

  • Hangouts app and metrics
  • Platform for Mobile with SDKs and APIs

Maps

  • Offline for Android
  • Enhanced maps in API
  • Transit data in API

Nexus

YouTube

  • Updated 720p HD API
  • Heat maps and symbols in API
  • Updated Android app
Galaxy Nexus

Nexus 7

Nexus Q

Chromebox

Extended the I/O conference from the usual two-day schedule to three days. There was no keynote on the final day.

The afterparty hosted Paul Oakenfold and Train. [10][11][12]

2013 May 15 - 17 Android

App Engine

Google+

  • Redesign with photo and sharing emphasis

Hangouts

  • Updated IM platform

Maps

  • Redesign on web and Android

Play

TV

Chromebook Pixel The amount of time for all the $900 (or $300 for school students and faculty) tickets to sell out was 49 minutes, even when registrants had both Google+ and Wallet accounts by requirement.

There were a fleet of remote-controlled blimpsstreaming a bird's-eye view of I/O.

The afterparty hosted Billy Idol. [13][11][14]

2014 June 25 - 26 Android

Chromebook

  • Improvements

Google Fit

Gmail

  • API
LG G Watch

Samsung Gear Live

Moto 360

Google Cardboard

The Moto 360 was made available to attendees by shipping it afterwards.[15]
2015 May 28 - 29 Android

Chrome

  • Custom tabs

Gmail

  • Inbox availability for everyone

Maps

  • Offline mode

Nanodegree

Now

  • Reduction in voice error
  • Context improvements

Photos

Play

  • "About" tabs for developer pages
  • A/B listings
  • Store listing experiments
  • "Family Star" badge

Project Brillo

Nexus 9

Improved Google Cardboard

Marshmallow includes new feature such as:
  • App permission controls
  • Native fingerprint recognition.
  • "Deep sleep", a mode which puts the device to sleep for power saving.
  • USB Type-C support
  • Deep-linking app support, which leads verified app URLs to the app in the Play store.

Android Wear adds:

  • "Always on" extension to apps
  • Wrist gestures

Nanodegree is an Android course on Udacity

Project Brillo is a new operating system for the Android-based Internet of things. Project Weave is a common language for IoT devices to communicate [16][17]

2016 May 17 - 19 Shoreline Amphitheatre Allo

Android

Assistant

Duo

Firebase

Home

Play integration with Chrome OS

None Sundar Pichai moved Google I/O to Shoreline Amphitheatre for the first time. Attendees were given sunglasses and sunscreen due to the amphitheater's outside conditions, however many attendees were sunburned so the talks were relatively short.[18]

Android Instant Apps is a code path that downloads a part of an app instead of accessing a web app, which allows links to load apps on-demand without installation. This was shown with the B&H app.[19] Android support for VR was shown with Daydream.[20]

Firebase, a mobile application platform, now adds storage, reporting and analytics.[21] [22][23]

2017 May 17 - 19 Shoreline Amphitheatre TBD TBD Google I/O will be held at the Shoreline Amphitheatre in Mountain View, CA for the second year in a row. [24]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "sundarpichai on Twitter". Twitter. 
  2. ^ "Four things to expect from Google's upcoming I/O conference". indiatimes.com. 2016-05-16. Retrieved 2016-05-31. 
  3. ^ "2008 Google I/O Session Videos and Slides". 
  4. ^ Google I/O 2009
  5. ^ Google I/O 2010
  6. ^ Google I/O 2011
  7. ^ Google I/O: The Android Story Red Monk, May 12, 2011
  8. ^ "Google gives away 5,000 Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 tablets to devs at I/O". engadget.com. AOL Inc. Retrieved 1 March 2012. 
  9. ^ "Google Taps Amazon to Distribute Free Chromebooks to I/O Attendees". AllThingsD.com. Dow Jones & Company Inc. Retrieved 1 March 2012. 
  10. ^ "Google I/O 2012 extended to three days from June 27-29, 2012 - The official Google Code blog". Googlecode.blogspot.com. 2011-11-28. Retrieved 2013-05-10. 
  11. ^ a b "Google I/O 2013". Developers.google.com. Archived from the original on 2013-05-10. Retrieved 2013-05-10. 
  12. ^ "Google I/O 2012 : Day 1". Gadgetronica. 2012-06-28. Archived from the original on 2013-07-09. Retrieved 2013-05-10. 
  13. ^ Wednesday, March 13th, 2013 (2013-03-13). "Google I/O 2013 Registration Sells Out In 49 Minutes As Users Report Problems Early On Making Payments". TechCrunch. Retrieved 2013-05-10. 
  14. ^ Murph, Darren (2012-12-04). "Google I/O 2013 dates announced: starts May 15th, registration to open early next year". Engadget.com. Retrieved 2013-05-10. 
  15. ^ "Cardboard". Google Developers. Google. Retrieved 17 July 2014. 
  16. ^ "Registration". Retrieved 24 February 2015. 
  17. ^ "Mark Your Calendars—Google I/O 2015 Is Happening On May 28th And 29th". Retrieved 13 February 2015. 
  18. ^ "Google I/O 2016: AI, VR Get Day In The Sun". Information Week. 
  19. ^ "Android Instant Apps will blur the lines between apps and mobile sites". Ars Technica. Retrieved 2016-05-18. 
  20. ^ Robertson, Adi (2016-05-18). "Daydream is Google's Android-powered VR platform". The Verge. Retrieved 2016-05-18. 
  21. ^ Miller, Paul (18 May 2016). "Google's Firebase cleans up the mess Facebook left by killing Parse". 
  22. ^ Google I/O 2016 in pictures: What happens when you make nerds go outside Ars Technica, May 20, 2016
  23. ^ Brandom, Russell (2016-05-18). "The 10 biggest announcements from Google I/O 2016". The Verge. Retrieved 2016-07-14. 
  24. ^ Novet, Jordan (2017-01-25). "Google I/O 2017 Dates Announced May 17-19 in Mountain View Again". Venture Beat. Retrieved 2017-02-12. 

External links[edit]