Gopala Davies

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Gopala Davies
Gopala Davies-Headshot.jpg
Born (1988-05-14) 14 May 1988 (age 32)
Pretoria, Gauteng, South Africa
NationalitySouth African
OccupationActor and Director
Years active2008–present
Websitehttp://gopaladavies.com

Gopala Davies (born 14 May 1988) is a South African actor and director. He is best known for his intermedial theatre production Barbe Bleue: A story about madness, which won a Standard Bank Ovation Award at The National Arts Festival in 2015, and the Best Student Director Award in 2014.[1][2][3][4][5]

Gopala plays the character Adam in the short Film Lilith: Genesis One which won the Film category at the 2015 PPC Imaginarium Awards.[6][7] and the 2016 'Best International Experimental' at the ICARO Festival Internacional de Cine. He plays the role of Robert in the SABC 1 soap opera Generations: The Legacy. Gopala also toured South Africa with Pieter Toerien’s The History Boys, which won a Naledi award for The Best Production of a Play in 2011.[8][9][10]

In 2013 Gopala played the role of Mohammed in Tom Coash’s Cry Havoc, produced by Grace Meadows and Ashraf Johaardien, in which he performed alongside actors David Dennis and Brenda Radloff.[11][12][13][14][15]

In 2016 Gopala was commissioned by the French Institute of South Africa (Institut Français) to direct Les Cenci: A story about Artaud for the National Arts Festival’s Main Programme. He also played the role of Alphonse Lebel in Jade Bowers’ Scorched, written by Wajdi Mouawad.[16]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Staff Reporter". Grocott's Mail. 15 July 2014. Retrieved 22 January 2016.
  2. ^ Taylor, Anne (12 July 2015). "Creative excellence rewarded at National Arts Festival 2015". National Arts Festival. Retrieved 25 January 2016.
  3. ^ Lankester, Tony (13 July 2014). "2014 Standard Bank Ovation Awards announced at National Arts Festival". National Arts Festival. Retrieved 25 January 2016.
  4. ^ BWW News Desk (14 July 2014). "2014 Standard Bank Ovation Awards Revealed at National Arts Festival". BWW. Retrieved 22 January 2016.
  5. ^ Aldridge, William; Kruger, Elmarie. "Barbe Bleue: a story of madness". Perdeby. Retrieved 22 January 2016.
  6. ^ ART Times (4 August 2015). "The 2015/16 PPC Imaginarium Awards". ART Times. Retrieved 25 January 2016.
  7. ^ Screen Africa (8 December 2015). "SA short gains recognition abroad". Retrieved 22 January 2016.
  8. ^ Lindberg, Dawn. "The winners – Naledi Theatre Awards 2011". Naledi Theatre Awards. Retrieved 22 January 2016.
  9. ^ McKenna, Neal (22 August 2011). "Brilliant Boys". Independent Online. Retrieved 25 January 2016.
  10. ^ Pieter Toerien Productions (15 June 2011). "Making history with Pieter Toerien". Artslink. Retrieved 25 January 2016.
  11. ^ Maputle, Precious (30 September 2013). "Explosive Cry Havoc at UJ Con Cowan Theatre". Artslink. Retrieved 25 January 2016.
  12. ^ Stones, Lesley (14 October 2013). "Cry Havoc: More than a love-hate story". Daily Maverick. Retrieved 25 January 2016.
  13. ^ Bizcommunity (19 April 2013). "Lineup for Grahamstown National Arts Festival". Bizcommunity. Retrieved 25 January 2016.
  14. ^ City Press (6 July 2013). "Review – Cry Havoc: An unsettling coincidence". News 24. Retrieved 25 January 2016.
  15. ^ Vermaas, Nigel (6 July 2013). "Love conquers nothing". Cue Online. Retrieved 25 January 2016.
  16. ^ "Scorched a piece of theatre history". Artslink. Retrieved 22 November 2016.

External links[edit]