Gordon Fraser (cyclist)

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Gordon Fraser
Gord Fraser.jpg
Personal information
Full nameGordon Harold Fraser
Born (1968-11-19) 19 November 1968 (age 53)
Ottawa, Canada
Height1.75 m (5 ft 9 in)
Weight71 kg (157 lb)
Team information
Current teamRetired
DisciplineRoad
Role
Rider typeSprinter
Professional teams
1994–1996Motorola Cycling Team
1997Mutuelle de Seine-et-Marne
1998–2002Mercatone Uno–Bianchi
2003–2006Health Net–Maxxis
Managerial teams
2009Team Type 1
2010UnitedHealthcare–Maxxis
2011Realcyclist.com Cycling Team
2015–2018Silber Pro Cycling Team
2019Floyd's Pro Cycling
2022–Israel Cycling Academy

Gordon "Gord" Fraser (born November 19, 1968) is a Canadian former professional road racing cyclist. As a rider he specialised in sprinting.[1]

Fraser is a three-time Olympian and four-time Commonwealth Games participant and has over 200 career wins including becoming the 2004 Canadian national road race champion. He also rode in the 1997 Tour de France and won the US National Race Calendar series twice.[1] He retired from professional cycling at the end of the 2006 season after racing four seasons for the Health Net Pro Cycling Team Presented by Maxxis.

He went on to be a directeur sportif with Team Type 1 in 2009, and in 2010 joined UnitedHealthcare-Maxxis as a directeur sportif. In 2011 became DS for the US Continental team, Realcyclist.com.[2] Whilst there he guided Francisco Mancebo to the top of the National Race Calendar individual standings in 2011 and again in 2012 (under the team's new name of Competitive Cyclist Racing Team). However he left the team when it merged with Kenda-5 Hour Energy ahead of the 2013 season. Subsequently he was approached by Team Exergy to work for them in 2013, however this fell through when Exergy withdrew its sponsorship of the team.[1] In 2014 he worked for Team SmartStop at the USA Pro Cycling Challenge, and took the directeur sportif role at the Silber Pro Cycling Team for several races on a part-time basis, before signing a two year deal with the squad in September of that year.[3] After it emerged that Silber would disband at the end of the 2018 season, Floyd Landis announced that Fraser would serve as manager of his new UCI Continental team, Floyd's of Leadville.[4] After leaving the scene for two years, Fraser was announced to become the head directeur sportif of the Israel Cycling Academy team for the 2022 season, replacing Zak Dempster.[5]

Fraser resides in Tucson, Arizona and has two sons named Angus and Axel.

Major results[edit]

1992
1st Stage 5 Niederösterreich Rundfahrt
1994
1st Paris–Troyes
1st Paris–Chauny
1st Stages 2, 4 & 5 Tour de Normandie
1st Stages 2 & 5 Tour du Vaucluse
1995
5th Trofeo Luis Puig
1997
1st Stage 4 Grand Prix du Midi Libre
5th Paris–Mantes
10th Le Samyn
1998
1st Stage 2 Vuelta a Asturias
1st Stages 1 & 4 Redlands Bicycle Classic
1st Stage 1 Killington Stage Race
1st Stage 1 Tour de Beauce
1st Stage 4 Tour de Toona
2nd Overall Sea Otter Classic
1999
1st Overall Tucson Bicycle Classic
1st Stages 1 & 2
Tour Trans Canada
1st Stages 2, 3, 6, 8 & 9
1st Points classification
1st Stages 3 & 5 Redlands Bicycle Classic
1st Stages 2 & 7 International Cycling Classic
1st Stage 5 Tour de Beauce
1st Stage 4 Tour de Toona
1st Stage 2 Fitchburg Longsjo Classic
2nd Silver medal america.svg Road race, Pan American Games
2nd Silver medal america.svg Road race, Pan American Road Championships
2nd Overall Sea Otter Classic
3rd Athens Twilight Criterium
7th First Union Classic
2000
1st Athens Twilight Criterium
1st GP de la Ville de Rennes
1st Stage 1 Critérium International
1st Overall Valley of the Sun Stage Race
1st Stages 1 & 3
1st Overall Tour de Toona
1st Stages 1, 2, 3 & 4
1st Prologue & Stage 3 Sea Otter Classic
2nd Road race, National Road Championships
2nd First Union Classic
8th Philadelphia International Cycling Classic
2001
1st Stage 1 Tour de Langkawi
1st Stage 2 Tour de Beauce
1st Stage 2 Redlands Bicycle Classic
1st Prologue & Stage 3 Tour de Toona
2nd Clarendon Cup
2002
1st First Union Classic
1st Overall Tucson Bicycle Classic
1st Stages 1, 2 & 3
1st Athens Twilight Criterium
1st Manhattan Beach Grand Prix
1st Stage 1 Valley of the Sun Stage Race
1st Stage 2 Sea Otter Classic
1st Stage 6b Tour de Beauce
3rd Overall USA Cycling National Racing Calendar
2003
1st Gastown Grand Prix
1st Stages 1 & 3 Tour of the Gila
1st Stage 3 Tour de Beauce
1st Stage 1 Tucson Bicycle Classic
1st Stage 1 Redlands Bicycle Classic
1st Stages 2, 3 & 4 Pomona Valley Stage Race
3rd Manhattan Beach Grand Prix
2004
1st MaillotCan.PNG Road race, National Road Championships
1st Stages 1 & 7 Tour de Georgia
1st Jersey blue.svg Points classification, Tour de Langkawi
1st Stage 4 Cascade Cycling Classic
2nd Overall USA Cycling National Racing Calendar
2nd CSC Invitational
2nd Wachovia Classic
3rd Philadelphia International Championship
2005
1st Wachovia Classic
1st Gastown Grand Prix
1st Stage 6 Tour de Georgia
1st Historic Roswell Criterium [fr]
1st Stage 1 Cascade Cycling Classic
1st Stage 4 Nature Valley Grand Prix
2nd Overall San Dimas Stage Race
1st Stage 2
2nd Overall Sea Otter Classic
1st Stage 2
3rd Overall Tour de Delta
1st Stage 3
2006
1st Jersey yellow.svg Overall Joe Martin Stage Race
1st Stages 1, 2 & 4
1st Historic Roswell Criterium [fr]
1st Stage 3 Tour of the Gila
1st Stage 3 Tour de Delta
1st Stage 3 Central Valley Classic
3rd Overall Tour of Elk Grove
3rd Athens Twilight Criterium

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Malach, Pat (26 February 2013). "Fraser picking up pieces after Exergy team collapse". cyclingnews.com. Retrieved 28 September 2016.
  2. ^ "UnitedHealthcare Presented by Maxxis blends veterans with up-and-coming riders for 2010". Facebook.com. Retrieved 5 November 2014.
  3. ^ "Fraser signs two-year deal to direct Silber Pro Cycling". cyclingnews.com. 9 September 2014. Retrieved 28 September 2016.
  4. ^ Cash, Dane (5 October 2018). "Q&A: Why Floyd Landis is starting a cycling team". VeloNews. Retrieved 5 October 2018.
  5. ^ "Gordon Fraser new head sports director of Israel Cycling Academy". israelcyclingacademy.com. 19 September 2021. Retrieved 14 November 2021.

External links[edit]