Gornje Nerodimlje

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Gornje Nerodimlje

Nerodime e Epërme
village
Monastery of Emperor Uroš (1899)
Monastery of Emperor Uroš (1899)
Gornje Nerodimlje is located in Kosovo
Gornje Nerodimlje
Gornje Nerodimlje
Coordinates: 42°22′13″N 21°04′43″E / 42.3703°N 21.0786°E / 42.3703; 21.0786Coordinates: 42°22′13″N 21°04′43″E / 42.3703°N 21.0786°E / 42.3703; 21.0786
LocationKosovo[a]
DistrictDistrict of Ferizaj
MunicipalityFerizaj
Population
 • Total1,648

Gornje Nerodimlje (Albanian: Nerodime e Epërme, Serbian Cyrillic: Горње Неродимље/Upper Nerodimlje) is a village in the Ferizaj municipality, in southeastern Kosovo.[2] The village was first mentioned in the Gračanica charters (1311–16) of Serbian King Stefan Milutin.

Geography[edit]

The settlement lies in the cadastral area of Gornje Nerodimlje which has 1107 hectares.

History[edit]

The village was first mentioned in the Gračanica charters (1311–16) of Serbian King Stefan Milutin. Serbian King Stefan Dečanski had one of his royal courts here, in which the Dečani chrysobull was written in 1330. Emperor Stefan Dušan and his son Uroš V had their court near the fortresses of Gornji and Donji Petrič,[3] where many charters, letters and other documents were written.

Stefan Milutin died in 1321, in the courtyard of the Church of the Holy Archangels,[4] from where his body was transferred to his endowment, the Banjska monastery. In 1371, the last monarch of the Nemanjić dynasty, Emperor Uroš V, also died, in Nerodimlje. In 1705, his body was transferred to the Jazak monastery in Fruška Gora (in northern Serbia).

According to the Ottoman defter (tax registry), there was 71 Serbian households and two Orthodox priests. Several church buildings and ruins are located in the village.

The local monastery and church was built in the 14th century, and renovated in 1700. Up until 1975, a giant black pine tree grew above the church, said to have been planted by Stefan Dušan in 1336.

The Monastery of St. Uroš[5] is situated in a hamlet above the village, and it is said to have been founded by Empress Jelena on the grave of her only son Uroš V. His remains were transferred to Jazak from this church. There are also ruins of the Church of St. Nicholas and foundations of three churches whose dedication is unknown.

Several ethnic Serbs were abducted from the village during the Kosovo War (1998–99).[6] The Church of the Holy Archangels was looted and burnt.[7] Also, all of the Serbian gravestones were desecrated or destroyed.[8]

Demographic history
Ethnic group 1948 1953 1961 1971 1981[9] 1991 2011
Albanians 935 (49.58%) 1638 (99.39%)
Serbs 686 (36.37%) 0 (0.00%)
Others 19 10
Total[10] 845 935 1219 1267 1641 1886 1648

Notes and references[edit]

Notes'

  1. ^ Kosovo is the subject of a territorial dispute between the Republic of Kosovo and the Republic of Serbia. The Republic of Kosovo unilaterally declared independence on 17 February 2008, but Serbia continues to claim it as part of its own sovereign territory. The two governments began to normalise relations in 2013, as part of the 2013 Brussels Agreement. Kosovo is currently recognized as an independent state by 98 out of the 193 United Nations member states. In total, 112 UN member states recognized Kosovo at some point, of which 14 later withdrew their recognition.

References

  1. ^ 2011 Kosovo Census results
  2. ^ Kosovo is the subject of a territorial dispute between the Republic of Kosovo and the Republic of Serbia. The Republic of Kosovo unilaterally declared independence on 17 February 2008, but Serbia continues to claim it as part of its own sovereign territory. The two governments began to normalise relations in 2013, as part of the 2013 Brussels Agreement. Kosovo is currently recognized as an independent state by 98 out of the 193 United Nations member states. In total, 112 UN member states recognized Kosovo at some point, of which 14 later withdrew their recognition.
  3. ^ "Велики и Мали Петрич". Споменици културе у Србији. Retrieved 12 September 2014.
  4. ^ "Црква Св. арханђела". Споменици културе у Србији. Retrieved 12 September 2014.
  5. ^ "Црква Успења Богородичиног ("Манастир Св. Уроша")". Споменици културе у Србији. Retrieved 12 September 2014.
  6. ^ Nataša Kandić; Fond za humanitarno pravo (2001). Abductions and disappearances of non-Albanians in Kosovo. Humanitarian Law Center. p. 262.
  7. ^ Balcanica. Srpska Akademija Nauka i Umetnosti, Balkanolos̆ki Institut. 2009. p. 265.
  8. ^ Review of International Affairs. Federation of Yugoslav Journalists. 2000. p. 75.
  9. ^ 1981 Census, Kosovo Archived 2012-03-17 at the Wayback Machine
  10. ^ "Kosovo censuses 1948–1991". Retrieved 12 September 2014.

External links[edit]