Govanhill

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Govanhill
Govanhillcalderstreet.jpg
Calder Street in Govanhill
Govanhill is located in Glasgow council area
Govanhill
Govanhill
Location within Glasgow
Area0.86 km2 (0.33 sq mi) [1]
Population9,725 (2015)[1]
• Density11,308/km2 (29,290/sq mi)
OS grid referenceNS585628
Council area
Lieutenancy area
  • Glasgow
CountryScotland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townGLASGOW
Postcode districtG42
Dialling code0141
PoliceScotland
FireScottish
AmbulanceScottish
UK Parliament
Scottish Parliament
List of places
UK
Scotland
Glasgow
55°50′15″N 4°15′40″W / 55.837610°N 4.261055°W / 55.837610; -4.261055Coordinates: 55°50′15″N 4°15′40″W / 55.837610°N 4.261055°W / 55.837610; -4.261055

Govanhill (Scottish Gaelic: Cnoc a' Ghobhainn) is an area of Glasgow, Scotland. Historically part of Renfrewshire, it is situated south of the River Clyde between the Gorbals, Pollokshields, Strathbungo, Crosshill, and Queen's Park. The council ward has boundaries of Dixon Avenue and Dixon Road to the south, Victoria Road to the west, Butterbiggins Road to the north, and Aikenhead Road to the east. Govanhill had the status of a police burgh between 1877 and 1891 before becoming part of the City of Glasgow. Since 2007, it has fallen under the Southside Central ward of Glasgow City Council.

History[edit]

The history of the area is linked to the Dixon family.[2] A prominent ironmaster, William Dixon opened blast furnaces to the north of Govanhill which became known as Dixon's Blazes.[3][4][5] A company village called Fireworks Village was situated on the site of the later Burgh of Govanhill. The village was built by Dixon for his workers, who worked in his Little Govan Colliery.[6] The area itself was formed in 1877 and the main avenue that runs the length of it is called Dixon Avenue. Some of the local streets were named after the daughters of William Dixon Jnr: Daisy Street, and Annette Street.[6] Allison Street[7] is thought to be named after Sir Archibald Allison, Sheriff Principal of Lanarkshire.[6]

Govanhill gained the status of an independent police burgh in 1877;[8] on achieving this status a police office was set up off Belleisle Street. Cells for prisoners, tenements for constables, and stables were added.[6] Govanhill shared a burgh hall with its neighbour, Crosshill; this building is now known as the Dixon Halls. Both burghs were absorbed by the expanding city of Glasgow in 1891.[8][9][10] As the construction expanded to the west of Victoria Road during that period, Govanhill became joined with its older neighbour Strathbungo. A secondary school,[11] fire station[12][13] and police station[14][15] were constructed in that sector to serve the growing population, integrated into the same sandstone tenement style as surrounding dwellings. The buildings have been converted and still stand today - the school is now for younger age groups as St Brides Primary, the others are apartments;[16] The nearest fire station is still fairly close at Polmadie,[12] a short distance to the north of the modern police office at Aikenhead Road.[17][18]

Architecture[edit]

Escaping the wrecking ball[edit]

Govanhill was one of the few areas to avoid Glasgow Corporation's programme of 'Comprehensive Development Areas' in the 1960s. This program saw 29 inner city areas demolished and replaced with new buildings, typically high rise or deck access and non-traditional, with existing communities dispersed to new estates at the edge of Glasgow such as Pollok and Castlemilk, or to Scotland's new towns – e.g. East Kilbride, Cumbernauld.

The Dixon Halls, formerly Crosshill and Govanhill Burgh Hall (1879-1891). The boundary of the burghs ran through the building, with separate entrances for each

Govanhill resisted this redevelopment programme and, based on early experience in Govan, a community based Housing Association[19] was established in 1974, run by the residents living in the area. Instead of mass demolition, a steady process of improving the quality of the flats and installing modern amenities was undertaken. This was complemented by sensitive new building in gap sites.[20] The community action at that time has allowed Govanhill to retain their period housing stock and public buildings, the majority of which was built between 1890 and 1912 [21], including examples from famous Scottish architects such as Alexander "Greek" Thomson and James Robert Rhind.

21st Century[edit]

The refurbishment of Govanhill's tenement housing was not completed due to changes in policy and funding in the early 2000s [22]. By that time, 13 housing blocks in the south-west of the district remained 'unimproved'.[22] It is in this area that the most significant housing problems in Govanhill appeared – poor-quality housing stock, over 2,000 private landlords, low levels of owner occupation, low levels of factoring/property management and overcrowding.[22] In combination with housing issues, the district has been known at times as a place where levels of recorded crime and violence are higher than the national average, owing to its history as a destination for migrants of low means and high population density.[23]

Under Section 28 of the Housing (Scotland) Act 2014 and in order to tackle problems in the private rented sector, 4 tenement blocks within South West Govanhill were designate an Enhanced Enforcement Area (EEA) in September 2015 [24]. In 2017, this was expanded to include a further 14 blocks [25]. As a result, housing in the area has been improved, with Glasgow City Council seizing property that failed to achieve the required standard and removing rogue landlords from the Scottish Landlord Register [26] [27].

Buildings of note[edit]

Govanhill is home to one of Glasgow's original Carnegie libraries, designed in the Edwardian Baroque style by James Robert Rhind.[28][29]

Interior of Govanhill Baths, showing concrete roof construction
Activists at Victoria Road, Govanhill

The area has a number of residential buildings by architect Alexander "Greek" Thomson (known for notable Glasgow buildings including The Egyptian Halls and Holmwood House), such as 19-23 Garturk Street, 265-289 Allison Street and 34 Daisy Street[30] all of which remain private residences.

Govanhill Picture House is an Egyptian-themed cinema built in 1926, designed by architect Eric A. Sutherland. The building is currently considered 'at risk',[31] and as of 2019, local community group Glasgow Artists' Moving Image Studios (GAMIS) has been working to bring the cinema into use for the local vibrant art scene.[32]

Govanhill Baths, which currently provide a home for communities groups, and health and wellbeing programmes - from swimming classes to art and ceramics groups[33][34] - was designed by A. B. McDonald and opened in 1917 after the architect's death.[35] It closed as a swimming venue in 2001, but moves to demolish the building were resisted by community groups.[36][37]

Community[edit]

Immigration and diversity[edit]

From the first days of the neighbourhood's formation, Govanhill has always been a popular settlement area for people coming to Glasgow and Scotland.[4] The population has regularly changed and diversified as migrants have chosen to live in the area. Migration started with people from the Highlands and Lowlands of Scotland; from England (workers from Shropshire to carry new techniques at the iron works);[38] from Ireland (particularly County Donegal);[39] Italians;[40] Jewish people fleeing persecution in Eastern Europe;[41][42] people from the Punjab and other parts of the Indian sub-continent;[43] Glasgow's new communities of former asylum seekers and refugees and – most recently – migrants benefiting from Enlargement of the European Union originating from Poland, Slovakia, the Czech Republic (2004) and Romania and Bulgaria (2007). The area has long been Scotland's most culturally diverse neighbourhood. Of the 15,000 people living in the neighbourhood, approximately 40% are from ethnic minority communities (2012),[44] with Roma people from Eastern Europe making up 3,000–3,500 of the local population.[45] This diversity is reflected in the local shops, the languages spoken in the street and in the people found locally. A social survey carried out by Govanhill Housing Association identified 52 nationalities and 32 languages spoken within just 13 tenement blocks within the area.[22][4]

Racial tension[edit]

Concerns over issues such as child exploitation and human trafficking became more prevalent since increased migration of the Roma community into Govanhill from Eastern Europe.[46][47][48][49][50][51] However, when specialist officers from Police Scotland's National Child Abuse Investigation Unit investigated these reports, they were proved to either be unsupported by evidence, to be exaggerated or not to involve the local Roma community.[52] During the COVID-19 pandemic in Scotland, false reports of Govanhill's Roma community flouting lockdown rules led to a reported 50% of the Roma population fleeing the area in fear of being targeted by racist violence.[53]

Deprivation[edit]

Owing to housing density, increases in population through migration, overcrowding and high levels of occupancy, the south west of Govanhill is one of the most densely populated areas in Scotland. This places strain on local infrastructure and adds to community tensions, environmental problems and other social issues. Despite this focus on the south west of the district the highest levels of multiple deprivations exist within North Govanhill, particularly in the predominantly social housing area to the east of Cathcart Road. As of December 2020 the Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD) and other sources indicates that:

  • 7 of the 12 data zones making up Govanhill are within the bottom 15% of data zones in Scotland. One of these data zones occupies the bottom 5% of data zones in Scotland;[54]
  • 20% of the population do not have any qualifications compared to 13% across the whole of Scotland;[54]
  • 1176 (17%) of the population is (officially) unemployed [54]
  • Since 2013, Govanhill has seen an extraordinary drop in crimes. Total crime figures for the year ending 2019 were 762, a drop of 75% since 2013-2014 (3165 total crimes).[55]

Govanhill has long been recognised as one of Scotland's deprived communities and this continues to be borne out in SIMD 2020. All but 1 of the area's 12 datazones fall into the bottom 30% of all Scottish datazones. Of these 11 datazones, 7 fall into the bottom 15% of Scottish datazones, with 6 datazones in the bottom 10%. This indicates particularly acute deprivation in much of the neighbourhood.Govanhill's most deprived datazones are typically found in the Govanhill East and Aikenhead part of the district. Three of the five lowest ranked datazones in Govanhill can be found in this area.[54]

In addition to the above, all but four of Govanhill's SIMD datazones occupy the bottom 15% of datazones in Scotland in terms of income.[54]

Attractions[edit]

Calder Street frontage of Govanhill Library

Govanhill is home to a thriving creative arts community, including Dance Factory Dance Studios[56] in Calder Street, Twisty-Headed Man Company[57] on Butterbiggins Road and a variety of arts activities taking place in Govanhill Baths. The Chalet in Dixon Avenue and Southside Studios in Westmoreland Street are both home to successful visual artists and other creatives. Since 2009, the area has had its own arts festival - Streetland, which usually takes place in early summer in streets and venues across the area. Govanhill Housing Association[19] also organises an annual Fun Day for local residents.

There is a vibrant voluntary sector in the local community with dozens of organisations active in the area. Considerable activity exists to improve the environment, engage young and old, promote integration, tackle addictions, develop the arts, provide education and develop opportunities locally. There are many opportunities to volunteer locally. At the local neighbourhood centre there is a considerable array of leisure and other activities which people can get involved in.[58]

Govanhill is also famous for its shops, which in themselves reflect the huge diversity of the area. There are a number of businesses supporting international connections – money transfer businesses, cargo services, travel agencies – as well as clothing and food stores for all nationalities. The area is also home to a number of traditional shops – cobblers, school uniform suppliers, cafes etc. – but planning approval has also recently been granted for a mixed leisure and retail development at the demolished Larkfield bus depot near Eglinton Toll.

The area is home to many faith communities, with churches, mosques and synagogues often in close proximity or side by side. Faith communities are often delivering significant community services as part of their core work and this activity often goes under the radar. Local churches are involved in delivering services to homeless, those in food poverty, children and families, street workers, elderly and those experiencing isolation and loneliness. Local faith communities also provide a number of drop-in cafes or free meals and have been instrumental in establishing the local food bank, as well as meeting the impacts of Welfare reform.

Govanhill International Festival and Carnival[edit]

Govanhill International Festival and Carnival is a yearly event beginning in 2017, it is an 11-day cultural programme featuring live music and historical, culinary, and educational events culminating in a carnival parade.[59][60][61]

Elected representatives[edit]

Notable people from Govanhill[edit]

Industry[edit]

  • Charles Frank (1865–1959), optical and scientific instrument maker, emigrated from Lithuania to Govanhill by 1910
  • Sir Monty Finniston (1912–1991), industrialist

Politics[edit]

The Arts[edit]

Sport[edit]

Medicine[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b - 2011 Intermediate Zone (Govanhill East and Aikenhead + Govanhill West), Scottish Government Statistics, 2015
  2. ^ 1839: A Workers' Suburb, Govanhill People's History, 2015
  3. ^ "Scotland's Landscape: Govanhill". BBC. Retrieved 4 November 2018.
  4. ^ a b c "Govanhill: Glasgow's Ellis Island". The Scotsman. 10 February 2013. Retrieved 10 September 2019.
  5. ^ Industrial Revolution: 1770s to 1830s: Neighbourhoods: Little Govan, The Glasgow Story
  6. ^ a b c d Villages of Glasgow, Aileen Smart, ISBN 0-85976-391-9 p. 105
  7. ^ Glasgow’s Crosses, Glasgow History, 28 May 2016
  8. ^ a b Maver, Irene. "Second City of The Empire: 1830s to 1914". The Glasgow Story. Retrieved 4 March 2017.
  9. ^ "Dixon Halls". The Glasgow Story. Retrieved 4 March 2017.
  10. ^ City of Glasgow Act 1891, (54 & 55 Vict.) c. cxxx, section 4.
  11. ^ Strathbungo Secondary School (Glasgow City Archives, Department of Education, 1970s), The Glasgow Story
  12. ^ a b V04 Polmadie, The History of Scottish Fire Brigades
  13. ^ Glasgow, 52, 54, 56, 58 Allison Street, Fire Station, Canmore
  14. ^ Police Offices The Glasgow Police Museum
  15. ^ Glasgow, 82-84 Craigie Street, Craigie Street Police Station, Canmore
  16. ^ Primary school forced to install washing machines to end bedbug infestation nightmare, Evening Times, 15 June 2019
  17. ^ Police probe break-ins at own station and suspect fellow cop is reponsible[sic], Daily Record, 8 January 2012
  18. ^ Two police officers injured in Glasgow road accident, BBC News, 26 March 2017
  19. ^ a b "Govanhill Housing Association".
  20. ^ Govanhill Street (Mitchell Library, Glasgow Collection, Bulletin Photographs, 1984), The Glasgow Story
  21. ^ "Our history".
  22. ^ a b c d "History of Govanhill – Govanhill Community Information".
  23. ^ Govanhill declared Scotland's murder capital, Daily Record, 24 August 2008
  24. ^ "Enhanced Enforcement Area – Glasgow City Council".
  25. ^ "Council given permission to extend Govanhill Enhanced Enforcement Area".
  26. ^ "Govanhill slum landlords forced out as council seizes control of entire block of squalid flats".
  27. ^ "Nine Govanhill landlords banned from renting homes".
  28. ^ "Govanhill Library". www.glasgowlife.org.uk.
  29. ^ Govanhill Library (Glasgow City Archives, Libraries Department, 1907), The Glasgow Story
  30. ^ "Scottish Architects". www.scottisharchitects.org.uk.
  31. ^ Barr, G. "Govanhill Picture House". Scottish Cinemas. Retrieved 13 August 2018.
  32. ^ Barr, G. "Glasgow Artists' Moving Image Studios". Retrieved 27 April 2020.
  33. ^ "Projects". Govanhill Baths.
  34. ^ "Historic Govanhill Baths awarded £1.2m lottery grant". BBC News. 24 September 2015.
  35. ^ Govanhill Public Baths and Wash-house (Glasgow City Archives, Department of Baths and Wash Houses, 1917), The Glasgow Story
  36. ^ "Calder Street Public Baths and Washhouse (Former), 99, Calder Street, Govanhill - Buildings at Risk Register". www.buildingsatrisk.org.uk.
  37. ^ "Govanhill Baths... still afloat after 100 years". Evening Times. 20 November 2014.
  38. ^ Villages of Glasgow, Aileen Smart, ISBN 0-85976-391-9 p. 102
  39. ^ 1880: Irish Migration to Glasgow, Govanhill People's History, 2015
  40. ^ 1890: Italian Migration to Scotland: Extracts from 'The Scots- Italians, Recollections of an Immigrant' (Joe Pieri), Govanhill People's History, 2015
  41. ^ Pupils at Queen's Park Secondary 1936 (Scottish Jewish Archives Centre), The Glasgow Story
  42. ^ 1900: Jewish Migration, Govanhill People's History, 2015
  43. ^ 1950: Asian Immigration: Hard Times, Govanhill People's History, 2015
  44. ^ Govanhill, Understanding Glasgow, 2012
  45. ^ 2004: East European Connections, Govanhill People's History, 2015
  46. ^ The Child Sex Scandal On The Streets Of Scotland, Fight Human Trafficking News, 13 August 2007
  47. ^ Police rescue 16 year old from sex traffickers after four brothel raids in Glasgow, Daily Record, 16 June 2011
  48. ^ Govanhill child sex trade: 'There are so many... it's easy pickings for child abusers', The Times, 17 November 2017
  49. ^ Raids target crime group behind £4.6m benefit fraud, BBC News, 1 August 2018
  50. ^ Govanhill community: Horror but no surprise as four guilty of trafficking, Evening Times, 12 October 2019
  51. ^ Govanhill is an exciting place and it isn't bedbugs or overcrowding, Evening Times, 30 November 2018
  52. ^ Child sex investigation in Govanhill concludes without proof of allegations, Evening Times, 9 November 2018
  53. ^ "Claims 50% of Roma group have fled Govanhill after false Covid-19 rumours". Glasgow Times. 11 April 2020.
  54. ^ a b c d e Map Chooser, Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation 2020
  55. ^ "Recorded Crimes in Govanhill and Crosshill, Glasgow: Police Scotland; Period: April 2013-Jul 2018". Police Scotland.
  56. ^ "Dance Factory Dance Studios".
  57. ^ "Twisty-Headed Man Company". Archived from the original on 14 April 2011.
  58. ^ "Govanhill Neighbourhood Centre".
  59. ^ "Festival 2019". Govanhill Baths.
  60. ^ "Govanhill International Festival & Carnival 2019 – Get Involved". South East Integration Network. 1 April 2019.
  61. ^ "Govanhill fights back to recover headline-tarnished reputation". The National. 11 August 2019.
  62. ^ a b c d "WriteToThem - Choose your representative". Retrieved 3 December 2018.

External links[edit]