Second Aznar Government

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Second Aznar Government
Flag of Spain.svg
11th Government of Spain (since 1975)
Date formed 27 April 2000
Date dissolved
  • 16 March 2004 (formally)
  • 17 April 2004 (caretaker)
People and organisations
Head of government José María Aznar
Deputy head of government
Head of state Juan Carlos I
No. of ministers
  • 17 (2000–02)
  • 16 (2002–04)
Member party PP
Status in legislature Majority
Opposition party PSOE
Opposition leader José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero
History
Election(s) 2000 general election
Outgoing election 2004 general election
Legislature term(s) 7th Legislature (2000–04)
Budget(s) 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004
Predecessor Aznar I
Successor Zapatero I

The 7th Spanish General Courts were elected at the 2000 general election on 12 March and first met on 5 April. José María Aznar was invested as Prime Minister on 26 April by the Congress of Deputies and was sworn into office the following day. On the nomination of the Prime Minister, the Second Aznar Government, or the 11th Government of Spain since the Spanish transition to democracy, was appointed.

History[edit]

Investiture[edit]

First round: 26 April 2000
Absolute majority (176/350) required
Candidate: José María Aznar
Choice Vote
Parties Votes
YesYYes PP (183), CiU (15), CC (4)
202 / 350
No PSOE (125), IU (8), PNV (7), BNG (3), PA (1), ERC (1), ICV (1), EA (1),
CHA (1)
148 / 350
Abstentions
0 / 350
Source: Historia Electoral

Cabinets[edit]

Office Name Term
President of the Government José María Aznar López
First Vice President Mariano Rajoy Brey 2000–2003
Rodrigo Rato Figaredo 2003–2004
Second Vice President Rodrigo Rato Figaredo 2000–2003
Javier Arenas Bocanegra 2003–2004
Spokesman of the Government Pío Cabanillas Alonso (Minister without portfolio) 2000–2002
Mariano Rajoy Brey (Minister of the Presidency) 2002–2003
Eduardo Zaplana (Minister of Labor) 2003–2004
Minister of Foreign Affairs Josep Piqué 2000–2002
Ana Palacio Vallelersundi 2002–2004
Minister of Justice Ángel Acebes Paniagua 2000–2002
José María Michavila 2002–2004
Minister of Defence Federico Trillo-Figueroa Martínez-Conde 2000–2004
Minister of Finance Cristóbal Montoro Romero 2000–2004
Minister of the Interior Jaime Mayor Oreja 2000–2001
Mariano Rajoy Brey 2001–2002
Ángel Acebes Paniagua 2002–2004
Minister of Public Works Francisco Álvarez Cascos 2000–2004
Minister of Education, Culture and Sport Pilar del Castillo 2000–2004
Minister of Labour and Social Affairs Juan Carlos Aparicio Pérez 2000–2002
Eduardo Zaplana 2002–2004
Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food Miguel Arias Cañete 2000–2004
Minister of the Presidency Mariano Rajoy Brey 2000–2001
Juan José Lucas 2001–2002
Mariano Rajoy Brey 2002–2003
Javier Arenas Bocanegra 2003–2004
Minister of Public Administrations Jesús Posada Moreno 2000–2002
Javier Arenas 2002–2003
Julia García-Valdecasas 2003–2004
Minister of Health and Consumption Celia Villalobos 2000–2002
Ana María Pastor Julián 2002–2004
Minister of the Environment Jaume Matas Palou 2000–2003
Elvira Rodríguez Herrer 2003–2004
Minister of Economy Rodrigo Rato Figaredo 2000–2004
Minister of Science and Technology Anna María Birulés i Bertrán 2000–2002
Josep Piqué 2002–2003
Juan Costa Climent 2003–2004