Grace Somatomorphic Technique

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Grace Somatomorphic Technique, commonly referred to as GST, is a movement system that is used primarily for physical fitness, as well as for rehabilitation and prenatal exercise.

GST was created by fitness instructor, dancer and actress Anna Rahe, who runs a studio in Hollywood, CA. There are also online instructional videos and an officially published DVD, Intro to GST, for those located outside of the Los Angeles area to experience and learn GST.

Kath Duncan wrote that GST provided the "best aspects of barre classes, Pilates, yoga, plyometrics, strength training, cardio, dance and stretching (aka the best of everything).[1]" Writing in Harper's Bazaar, Wendy Schmid described the technique as having "delivered for my back, backside, and beyond.[2]"

GST principles[edit]

  1. Oppositional force, movements should require constant oppositional internal force as opposed to static positions.
  2. GST Core, the core of the body runs entire length of spine, which is different from what is traditionally thought of as the rectus abdominis muscle between hip and ribs (six pack).

GST perspectives[edit]

Vitruvian Man

An integral compenent of the GST system is based on Leonardo da Vinci's Vitruvian Man. The Vitruvian Man is considered the ideal "body map" for efficient proportion and balance. Furthermore, the body is divided into 4 cortiles, which divide the core into 4 regions.

  1. 1st Coretile: Starting at the top of the pubic region through hips towards floor. (Direction: the muscle current flows front to back and down)
  2. 2nd Coretile: From navel to bottom of ribs.
  3. 3rd Coretile: From the bottom of the shoulder girdle to the collar bone. (Direction: the muscle current flows back to front and up)
  4. 4th Coretile: From the collar bone to brow line.

The 1st and 3rd Coretile are often most referred to, because they act as the governing core tiles and directly relate to how the limbs interact with the spine.

GST praxis[3][edit]

A multitude of exercise series are done utilizing stationary bars, springs, rollers, barrels and straps that target various aspects of the body's movement[which?] through the coretiles or through different types of forces such as traction. Even though GST utilizes several props in order to provide leverage and resistance, many exercises can be performed with little equipment or common household items like a towel or broom. Through intense focus on internal oppositional traction the muscles can be safely stretched and strengthened.

References[edit]

External links[edit]