Grade II listed buildings in Liverpool-L12

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Listed Buildings in Liverpool
Listed buildings in Liverpool
Grade I listed buildings
Grade II* listed buildings
Grade II listed buildings:

Liverpool is a city and port in Merseyside, England, which contains many listed buildings. A listed building is a structure designated by English Heritage of being of architectural and/or of historical importance and, as such, is included in the National Heritage List for England. There are three grades of listing, according to the degree of importance of the structure. Grade I includes those buildings that are of "exceptional interest, sometimes considered to be internationally important"; the buildings in Grade II* are "particularly important buildings of more than special interest"; and those in Grade II are "nationally important and of special interest". Very few buildings are included in Grade I — only 2.5% of the total. Grade II* buildings represent 5.5% of the total, while the great majority, 92%, are included in Grade II.[1]

Liverpool contains more than 1,550 listed buildings, of which 28 are in Grade I, 109 in Grade II*, and the rest in Grade II.[a] This list contains the Grade II listed buildings in the L12 postal district of Liverpool. The major building in the district is Croxteth Hall, which is listed at Grade II*,[2] and many of the buildings in the surrounding park and area are included in this list. The village of West Derby is at the main entrance to Croxteth Park, and various structures in the village are listed at Grade II. Elsewhere the district is residential, and contains a number of listed houses.

Grade II listed buildings from other areas in the city can be found through the template on the right, along with the lists of the Grade I and Grade II* buildings in the city.

Buildings[edit]

Name Location Built Notes
Alder Lodge Alder Road
53°25′16″N 2°54′02″W / 53.42100°N 2.90045°W / 53.42100; -2.90045 (Alder Lodge)
Mid 19th century A brick house with a steeply-pitched slate roof. It is in a single storey with an attic. Its front has two bays, with a single bay facing the road. There is a Tudor arched doorway with a Gothic-style door, and a dormer in a gable with a decorative bargeboard. There is a more elaborate bargeboard in the gable facing the road.[3][4]
Entrance,
Sandfield Park
Alder Road
53°25′16″N 2°54′03″W / 53.42106°N 2.90090°W / 53.42106; -2.90090 (Entrance, Sandfield Park)
1840s This consists of three stone gate piers with flanking walls at the entrance to a Victorian residential estate. The gate piers have moulded caps, and there are also piers at the ends of the walls.[3][5]
Thimble Hall Alder Road
53°25′16″N 2°54′04″W / 53.4211°N 2.9011°W / 53.4211; -2.9011 (Thimble Hall)
1847 Originating as a lodge, this is a stone building with a slate roof. It is in single storey, and has a three-bay front. Most of the windows have two lights and are mullioned. The entrance has a Tudor arch with a lancet window above. On the sides are canted bay windows, each under a gable containing a quatrefoil.[6]
Eddesbury Almonds Green
53°26′03″N 2°54′50″W / 53.4342°N 2.9139°W / 53.4342; -2.9139 (Eddesbury)
1885–85 Originating as a villa designed by J. Francis Doyle, it is in free Jacobean style. It is built in brick with sandstone dressings, and has a Westmorland slate roof. The building has an irregular plan, with two storeys and attics, and a front of six bays with shaped gables. The porch is carried on paired Tuscan columns. During the 20th century it was used as the Margaret Beavan Special School.[7][8][9]
Entrance lodge,
Eddesbury
Almonds Green
53°26′02″N 2°54′49″W / 53.43391°N 2.91363°W / 53.43391; -2.91363 (Lodge, Eddesbury)
1885–85 The lodge was probably designed by J. Francis Doyle. It is built in brick with a Westmorland slate roof. The lodge has a T-shaped plan, with a gabled entrance front. It is in two storeys, with decorative brickwork in the upper part of the gable. The windows are casements.[10]
Wall, gate piers and post box, Eddesbury Almonds Green
53°26′04″N 2°54′50″W / 53.43445°N 2.91382°W / 53.43445; -2.91382 (Wall and gates, Eddesbury)
1885–85 The sandstone wall surrounds the garden of the former villa. It includes three pairs of gate piers, two of which have a cornice and a ball finial, and another with a pyramidal cap. The wall also incorporates an Edward VII letter box.[11]
Hare and Hounds Public House Almonds Green
53°25′58″N 2°54′37″W / 53.4328°N 2.9103°W / 53.4328; -2.9103 (Hare and Hounds Public House)
After 1885 A stuccoed public house with a slate roof, and later added details. It is in two storeys, and has a three-bay front. At the top is an entablature, with pediments over the lateral bays. In the central bay is a first floor iron balcony. The entrances are round-headed with fanlights.[12][13][14]
2–6 Almonds Green
53°25′58″N 2°54′34″W / 53.4329°N 2.9095°W / 53.4329; -2.9095 (2–6 Almonds Green)
c. 1861–70 A row of three houses designed by W. Eden Nesfield. They are built in red brick with blue brick diapering, and have slate roofs with red ridge tiles. The houses are in a single storey with attics, and each house has three bays. The attics contain half-dormers and the windows are sashes.[12][15]
West Derby Public House 8 Almonds Green
53°25′59″N 2°54′35″W / 53.4330°N 2.9098°W / 53.4330; -2.9098 (West Derby Public House)
Early 19th century The public house is built in painted brick with applied timber decoration. It has two storeys, and is in two gabled bays, the gable of the left bay containing an attic. In the right bay is a single-storey canted bay window. The windows are sashes.[16][17]
10 Almonds Green
53°25′59″N 2°54′37″W / 53.43296°N 2.91033°W / 53.43296; -2.91033 (10 Almonds Green)
1660 A stone house with a roof of concrete tiles. It has two storeys, and is in two bays. The entrance has a Tudor arch, above which is a plaque with initials and the date. In the bottom storey are five-light mullioned windows; in the upper storeys are similar windows with three lights.[12][18]
11, 11A and 13 Almonds Green
53°25′58″N 2°54′38″W / 53.43286°N 2.91062°W / 53.43286; -2.91062 (11, 11A and 13 Almonds Green)
c. 1800 A row of shops, built in brick with slate roofs. They have two storeys, and are in four bays, with modern shop fronts. The windows in the upper floor are sashes.[13][19]
15, 17, 19A and 19 Almonds Green
53°25′59″N 2°54′40″W / 53.4330°N 2.9111°W / 53.4330; -2.9111 (15, 17, 19A and 19 Almonds Green)
Early 19th century A row of shops, built in brick with slate roofs. They have two storeys, and are in four bays, with modern shop fronts. The windows in the upper floor are sashes.[13][20]
97–103 Almonds Green
53°26′08″N 2°54′57″W / 53.4355°N 2.9159°W / 53.4355; -2.9159 (97–103 Almonds Green)
1863 A row of charity cottages built by the Croxteth Estate. They are constructed in red sandstone with slate roofs, and are in Tudorbethan style. The houses have two storeys, and a five-bay front, the outer two bays projecting forward. Above the entrances is a cartouche with an inscription and the date. The windows are mullioned and have two and three lights.[12][21]
Aintree Lodge Croxteth Hall Lane
53°26′46″N 2°53′56″W / 53.4461°N 2.8988°W / 53.4461; -2.8988 (Aintree Lodge)
Early 19th century A brick house on a stone base with stone dressings and a hipped roof. It is in a single storey, and has a three-bay front. The central bay is canted, and there is a two-bay extension at the rear.[22][23]
Old School House Croxteth Hall Lane
53°26′17″N 2°53′14″W / 53.4380°N 2.8872°W / 53.4380; -2.8872 (Old School House)
19th century This originated as a school, later converted into a house. It is built in red brick on a stone base with stone dressings, and has a hipped slate roof. It is in a single storeys, and has a three-bay front. The quoins and cornice are rusticated, and the windows are casements.[24]
The Cottage Croxteth Hall Lane
53°26′22″N 2°53′22″W / 53.4395°N 2.8894°W / 53.4395; -2.8894 (The Cottage)
18th century The cottage was extended later. The original part is in brick with a slate roof. It has two storeys and is in three bays, with horizontal-sliding sash windows. The later bay has an upper floor with timbering and decorative bargeboards.[25]
Bantam house Croxteth Park
53°26′40″N 2°53′23″W / 53.44450°N 2.88984°W / 53.44450; -2.88984 (Bantam house)
Early 19th century The bantam house is built in brick with a single roof. It has a square plan with a canted front. The central entrance and the windows have heads with pointed arches; around these are rustic-style timber architraves.[26]
Bridge Croxteth Park
53°26′29″N 2°53′44″W / 53.44127°N 2.89554°W / 53.44127; -2.89554 (Bridge)
1845 The bridge carries Croxteth Hall Lane over the path to the hall. It is built in rusticated stone with an archivolt, a cornice and a parapet. The keystones are carved with the Molyneux arms and a coronet. On the north and south sides are curved flanking walls.[27]
Bull box Croxteth Park
53°26′27″N 2°53′29″W / 53.44077°N 2.89150°W / 53.44077; -2.89150 (Bull box)
Early 19th century The bull box is built in brick with stone dressings and has a hipped slate roof. It has a square plan, with segmental-headed windows on the north and south sides, and a segmental-headed entrance on the east side.[28]
Carriage washing shelter Croxteth Park
53°26′29″N 2°53′31″W / 53.44149°N 2.89189°W / 53.44149; -2.89189 (Carriage washing shelter)
Mid 19th century The shelter consists of eight Tuscan-style iron columns supporting a timber roof, which is slated. To the south of this is a stone trough with an iron pump.[29][30]
Cottages, stable yard Croxteth Park
53°26′28″N 2°53′30″W / 53.44121°N 2.89161°W / 53.44121; -2.89161 (Cottages, stable yard)
Early 19th century The two cottages are built in brick with slate roofs. They are in two storeys, and stretch for four bays. The windows are casements with segmental heads, and two half-dormers.[31]
Farm Lodge Croxteth Park
53°26′29″N 2°53′33″W / 53.4414°N 2.8924°W / 53.4414; -2.8924 (Farm Lodge)
Early to mid 19th century The lodge is built in brick on a stone base with stone dressings and a slate roof. It is in a single storey, and has a two-bay gabled front. The windows are paired with segmental heads, keystones and chamfered mullions.[32]
Head gamekeeper's cottage Croxteth Park
53°26′42″N 2°53′08″W / 53.44505°N 2.88542°W / 53.44505; -2.88542 (Head gamekeeper's cottage, Croxteth Park)
1870s The cottage was designed by John Douglas. It is built in red brick with a roof of patterned blue and green slate and a tiled crest. It is in a single storey, with four bays. Features include a tile-hung gable with a lunette vent, and a lintel with an incised cross moline.[22][33]
Home farmhouse Croxteth Park
53°26′27″N 2°53′31″W / 53.44086°N 2.89188°W / 53.44086; -2.89188 (Home farmhouse, Croxteth Park)
Early 19th century The farmhouse was extended in the 1860s. It is built in brick with a tiled roof, the extension having stone dressings. The original part of the farmhouse has two storeys and is in two bays, the extension is in a single storey. The windows are sliding sashes.[29][34]
Kennels Croxteth Park
53°26′43″N 2°53′05″W / 53.4453°N 2.8847°W / 53.4453; -2.8847 (Kennels, Croxteth Park)
1870s The kennels were designed by John Douglas for the 4th Earl of Sefton. They are built in red brick with a roof of patterned blue and green slate and a tiled crest. The kennels are in a single storey, and have a three-bay front. To the right of the entrance are a pump and a stone trough. Associated with the kennels are exercise yards and a paddock with iron railings.[22][35][36]
North entrance, stable yard Croxteth Park
53°26′31″N 2°53′30″W / 53.4419°N 2.8918°W / 53.4419; -2.8918 (North entrance, stable yard)
Early 18th century (probable) The entrance consists of a pair of stone gate piers. They are decorated with channelled rustication, panelled pilasters, entablatures, and urn finials.[37]
Riding School Croxteth Park
53°26′30″N 2°53′30″W / 53.4417°N 2.8917°W / 53.4417; -2.8917 (Riding School)
Early 19th century The riding school stands to the south of Croxteth Hall, and has been converted into a restaurant. A small extension was added to the east side in 1905. The structure has a square plan, with a central courtyard, and is in a single storey. It is built in brick with stone dressings and has a slate roof. Along the south aspect are loose boxes.[29][38]
Stand Farmhouse Croxteth Park
53°27′00″N 2°52′47″W / 53.4499°N 2.8798°W / 53.4499; -2.8798 (Stand Farmhouse)
1689 The farmhouse was extended in 1731, and again in the 19th century. It is in two storeys, with a four-bay. The porch has a shaped gable and a casement window. Above the porch is a plaque with the arms of the Molyneux family. On the right side is a bay window.[39]
Stand Farm Barn Croxteth Park
53°27′00″N 2°52′48″W / 53.4501°N 2.8801°W / 53.4501; -2.8801 (Stand Farm Barn)
1689 The barn was extended in 1731. It is built in brick with stone dressings on a stone base, and has a slate roof. The features include segmental-headed entrances, a window, and ventilating eyes.[40]
Stand Farm Lodge Croxteth Park
53°27′18″N 2°52′35″W / 53.45487°N 2.87652°W / 53.45487; -2.87652 (Stand Farm Lodge)
19th century The lodge is built in brick with a slate roof. It has two storeys, and is in two bays. The windows are casements. A porch has been added on the gable end.[41]
65–71 Eaton Road North
53°25′54″N 2°54′49″W / 53.4317°N 2.9135°W / 53.4317; -2.9135 (65–71 Eaton Road North)
1773 A row of four brick houses with slate roofs. They have two storeys, and each house is in a single bay. Over the entrances and windows are wedge lintels; the windows are sashes.[42]
Finch Lodge Deysbrook Lane
53°26′17″N 2°52′53″W / 53.43798°N 2.88129°W / 53.43798; -2.88129 (Finch Lodge)
Early 19th century The lodge to Croxteth Hall is built in brick with a hipped slate roof. It is in one storey, with a front of three bays, and sides of two bays. The eaves are deep and overhanging. The windows are three-light sliding sashes. The lodge has a square porch with a stone cornice.[22][43]
283 and 285 Deysbrook Lane
53°26′11″N 2°53′09″W / 53.4365°N 2.8859°W / 53.4365; -2.8859 (283 and 285 Deysbrook Lane)
Late 18th century (probable) A pair of cottages in brick on a sandstone plinth and slate roofs. They are in two storeys, each cottage having one bay, and with lean-to extensions. The windows are casements.[44]
Lowlands Hayman's Green
53°25′58″N 2°54′52″W / 53.4329°N 2.9145°W / 53.4329; -2.9145 (Lowlands)
Mid 19th century This was built as a villa, and from 1957 has been the headquarters of the West Derby Community Association. It is built in stuccoed brick with painted ornamentation, and has hipped slate roofs. The house is in Italianate style with two storeys, attics and a basement, and a symmetrical three-bay front. The interior has retained many of its original features, including an elaborately decorated double staircase, galleries and, at the top, a lantern. The attached boundary walls and gate piers are included in the listing.[45][46]
2 and 4 Hayman's Green
53°25′55″N 2°54′41″W / 53.4320°N 2.9114°W / 53.4320; -2.9114 (2 and 4 Hayman's Green)
Mid 19th century A pair of stuccoed houses with slate roofs. They are in two storeys, and each house has two bays, the middle two bays projecting forward. At the top of the houses is a frieze. All the windows are sashes, those in the upper floor having three lights under round heads, those in the lower floor having architraves. In the porches are round-headed entrances.[47]
The Casbah Club 8 Hayman's Green
53°25′57″N 2°54′43″W / 53.4324°N 2.9120°W / 53.4324; -2.9120 (The Casbah Club)
c. 1860 This originated as a villa in red brick with stone dressings, in two storeys and an attic. In 1957 Mona Best, mother of the drummer Pete Best bought the house and in 1959 opened the basement as a coffee and music club. Early performers were The Quarrymen, and it became the performance birthplace of The Beatles. The rest of the house has been altered, but the basement retains features relating to the early development of the Beatles.[48]
Leyfield House Honey Green Lane
53°25′21″N 2°53′27″W / 53.4224°N 2.8908°W / 53.4224; -2.8908 (Leyfield House)
1830s A stuccoed house with a slate roof, it is in two storeys. There is a front of three bays, with a two-bay wing. The windows are sashes with architraves. The porch is in Doric style, with an Ionic entablature and a balustrade. The house stands within the campus of Cardinal Heenan Catholic High School, and has been converted for use by the school.[49][50]
67 Leyfield Road
53°25′38″N 2°53′45″W / 53.4271°N 2.8958°W / 53.4271; -2.8958 (67 Leyfield Road)
17th century (probable) A stone house with a stone tile roof. It is in two storeys and has three bays. The windows are casements, and there is a 20th-century open timber porch.[51]
West Derby Church of England Primary School Meadow Lane
53°26′00″N 2°54′35″W / 53.4333°N 2.9096°W / 53.4333; -2.9096 (Primary School, West Derby)
1860–61 The school was designed by H. P. Horner in Gothic Revival style. It is built in sandstone, is in a single storey, and has an L-shaped plan. On the front facing the road are a 20th-century casement window, a lancet window, and a large four-light window with Decorated tracery. Above the lancet window is tower with a diagonal buttress, bell openings, and a stone pyramidal roof.[12][13][52]
St James' Church Mill Lane
53°25′39″N 2°54′49″W / 53.4275°N 2.9135°W / 53.4275; -2.9135 (St James' Church)
1845–46 The church was designed by Edward Welch, and in 1875–76 the chancel was lengthened and a chapel and organ chamber were added by W. and J. Hay. It is built in sandstone, and consists of a nave without aisles, transepts, a chancel with a chapel and a vestry, and a west tower. The windows are lancets, and there are dormers in the roof. In 1994 the interior was re-ordered, and a wall was inserted to form a parish hall at the back of the church.[53][54]
76–82 Mill Lane
53°25′51″N 2°54′41″W / 53.4307°N 2.9113°W / 53.4307; -2.9113 (76–82 Mill Lane)
Early to mid 19th century A row of four brick houses with stone dressings and slate roofs in Georgian style. They have two storeys and basements, and each house is in a single bay. At the top is a cornice. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels. The entrances are round-headed with panelled pilasters and fanlights.[45][55]
92–96 Mill Lane
53°25′48″N 2°54′42″W / 53.4301°N 2.9117°W / 53.4301; -2.9117 (92–96 Mill Lane)
Early to mid 19th century A terrace of four brick houses with stone dressings and slate roofs in Georgian style. They have two storeys, and each house is in three bays. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels. The entrances are round-headed with panelled pilasters and fanlights.[45][56]
Sandheys 158 Mill Lane
53°25′40″N 2°54′54″W / 53.4278°N 2.9149°W / 53.4278; -2.9149 (Sandheys)
c. 1833–36 A stuccoed house with a slate roof. It is in two storeys, and has a three bay front. At the top is an entablature, and at the ends are pilasters. The windows are sashes, and there is an Ionic porch with pairs of columns. At the sides of the house are two-storey canted bay windows.[45][57]
Kiln Hey Sandfield Park
53°25′28″N 2°54′11″W / 53.4245°N 2.9030°W / 53.4245; -2.9030 (Kiln Hey)
1860s The house was extended in 1885, and later converted into a nursing home. It is built in brick with stone dressings, and has a slate roof. It is in two storeys with four bays. It has a Venetian window, the other windows being either mullioned and transomed, or sashes. Internal features include panelled rooms, an Adamesque ceiling, and a staircase under a coffered barrel vault.[3][58]
St Ives Sandfield Park
53°25′23″N 2°54′28″W / 53.4230°N 2.9077°W / 53.4230; -2.9077 (St Ives)
1853 A stone house with a slate roof in Italianate style. It has two storeys and an attic, and a front of five bays. The second bay projects forward and has a gable with a bargeboard. The porch is also gabled, with a decorative bargeboard, and the window above has an architrave, a frieze and a cornice. On the left side of the house is a two-storey canted bay window.[3][59]
St Paul's Church, West Derby Town Row
53°25′45″N 2°54′06″W / 53.4292°N 2.9018°W / 53.4292; -2.9018 (St Paul's Church)
1914–15 A Roman Catholic church designed by Pugin and Pugin and constructed in sandstone with a slate roof. It consists of a nave with a northwest baptistry, aisles, a chancel with flanking chapels, and a short southwest tower, and is in a free Perpendicular style. The marble and alabaster fittings were also designed by Pugin and Pugin. The interior was reordered in 1973–75.[45][60]
52 and 54 Town Row
53°25′52″N 2°54′23″W / 53.43101°N 2.90646°W / 53.43101; -2.90646 (52 and 54 Town Row)
1830s A pair of brick houses on a slate-clad base, with slate roofs. They are in two storeys. No. 52 has two bays and No. 54 has one. The windows are casements.[61]
56 Town Row
53°25′51″N 2°54′23″W / 53.43089°N 2.90633°W / 53.43089; -2.90633 (56 Town Row)
1830s A brick house with stone dressings and a hipped slate roof. It is in two storeys, and has three bays. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels. On the left side is a two-storey gabled porch.[62]
Main lodge West Derby Village
53°25′58″N 2°54′32″W / 53.4328°N 2.9088°W / 53.4328; -2.9088 (Lodge, West Derby Village)
1860s This was the lodge at the main entrance to Croxteth Hall, and was probably designed by W. Eden Nesfield. It is in two storeys with a three-bay front, and is in Tudorbethan style. The left and central bays project forward under gables. The windows have two and three lights and are mullioned. The gate piers carry stone lions sejant holding iron pennants.[16][63][64]
Village pound and stocks West Derby Village
53°25′59″N 2°54′36″W / 53.43293°N 2.91009°W / 53.43293; -2.91009 (Pound and stocks, West Derby Village)
Late 18th century (probable) The pound consists of two sandstone walls over 5 feet (1.5 m) high, the other two walls having been replaced by railings. Inside are the stocks, consisting of an iron bench and three pairs of leg stocks. The whole was replanted as a garden to celebrate the coronation of Edward VII.[65]
Street lamp and fountain West Derby Village
53°25′58″N 2°54′34″W / 53.43266°N 2.90946°W / 53.43266; -2.90946 (Lamp and fountain, West Derby Village)
1894 The lamp and drinking fountain are opposite the main entrance to Croxteth Hall. They were designed by A. P. Fry, and are in stone and bronze. They stand on the round base with buttresses, and have a niche with mosaic, and a drinking bowl for dogs. At the top is a cornice with an inscription, and an elaborate lamp and a lantern.[12][16][66]
Lodge, Broughton Hall Yew Tree Lane
53°25′31″N 2°53′18″W / 53.42518°N 2.88829°W / 53.42518; -2.88829 (Lodge, Broughton Hall)
1850s The lodge is in Gothic style. It is built in stone, and has a steep slate roof. The lodge is in a single storey with an attic. The windows, and the entrance in the gabled porch, have ogee heads. On some of the gables are ball finials.[49][67]
The Hare and Hounds public house
The West Derby public house
Bridge, Croxteth Park
Home Farmhouse, Croxteth Park
Kennels, Croxteth Park
Entrance to the Casbah Club
St Mary's School, West Derby
St James' Church tower
Main lodge to Croxteth Hall, West Derby Village
Stocks, West Derby Village
Drinking fountain, West Derby Village
Lodge, Broughton Hall

See also[edit]

Architecture of Liverpool

References and notes[edit]

Notes

  1. ^ These figures are taken from a search in the National Heritage List for England in May 2013, and are subject to variation as further buildings are listed, grades are revised, or buildings are delisted.

Citations

  1. ^ Listed Buildings, Historic England, retrieved 25 March 2015 
  2. ^ Historic England, "Croxteth Hall, Liverpool (1280299)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 July 2013 
  3. ^ a b c d Pollard & Pevsner (2006), p. 505
  4. ^ Historic England, "Alder Lodge, Liverpool (1205200)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 24 July 2013 
  5. ^ Historic England, "Entrance to Sandfield Park, Liverpool (1068413)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 23 July 2013 
  6. ^ Historic England, "Thimble Hall, Liverpool (1205198)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 23 July 2013 
  7. ^ Pollard & Pevsner (2006), pp. 504–505
  8. ^ Historic England, "Margaret Beavan Special School, Liverpool (1323718)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 July 2013 
  9. ^ Former Margaret Beavan School (PDF), Liverpool City Council, retrieved 26 July 2013 
  10. ^ Historic England, "Entrance Lodge at Margaret Beavan Special School, Liverpool (1323719)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 July 2013 
  11. ^ Historic England, "Boundary wall, gate piers and letter box at Margaret Beavan Special School, Liverpool (1323720)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 July 2013 
  12. ^ a b c d e f Pollard & Pevsner (2006), p. 503
  13. ^ a b c d Pye (2011), p. 220
  14. ^ Historic England, "The Hare and Hounds Public House, Liverpool (1205252)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 24 July 2013 
  15. ^ Historic England, "2 to 6 Almonds Row, Liverpool (1068386)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 23 July 2013 
  16. ^ a b c Pye (2011), p. 221
  17. ^ Historic England, "The West Derby Public House, Liverpool (1068387)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 23 July 2013 
  18. ^ Historic England, "10 Almonds Row, Liverpool (1068389)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 23 July 2013 
  19. ^ Historic England, "11, 11A and 13 Almonds Row, Liverpool (1356272)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 25 July 2013 
  20. ^ Historic England, "15, 17, 19A and 19 Almonds Row, Liverpool (1280807)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 25 July 2013 
  21. ^ Historic England, "97 to 103 Almonds Row, Liverpool (1068421)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 23 July 2013 
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Sources

External links[edit]