Grade II listed buildings in Liverpool-L17

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Listed Buildings in Liverpool
Listed buildings in Liverpool
Grade I listed buildings
Grade II* listed buildings
Grade II listed buildings:

Liverpool is a city and port in Merseyside, England, which contains many listed buildings. A listed building is a structure designated by English Heritage of being of architectural and/or of historical importance and, as such, is included in the National Heritage List for England. There are three grades of listing, according to the degree of importance of the structure. Grade I includes those buildings that are of "exceptional interest, sometimes considered to be internationally important"; the buildings in Grade II* are "particularly important buildings of more than special interest"; and those in Grade II are "nationally important and of special interest". Very few buildings are included in Grade I — only 2.5% of the total. Grade II* buildings represent 5.5% of the total, while the great majority, 92%, are included in Grade II.[1]

Liverpool contains more than 1,550 listed buildings, of which 28 are in Grade I, 109 in Grade II*, and the rest in Grade II.[a] This list contains the Grade II listed buildings in the L17 postal district of Liverpool. The district lies to the south of the city centre, and much of it developed in the 19th century as an area where the prosperous merchants and businessmen of the city built their mansions. Its centrepiece is Sefton Park, which is designated by English Heritage at Grade I in the Register of Historic Parks and Gardens.[2] The park contains a number of buildings listed at Grade II, including the lodges and entrances, statues, shelters, a bandstand, drinking fountains, and grottos. The roads encircling the park, especially Mossley Hill Drive and Ullet Road, contain listed houses originally built for the merchants. Also in the district is Fulwood Park, a private estate developed from 1840, which also includes listed mansions. Other listed buildings in the district include a church, a bank, a bridge, and a public house.

Grade II listed buildings from other areas in the city can be found through the template on the right, along with the lists of the Grade I and Grade II* buildings in the city.

Buildings[edit]

Aigburth Road Entrance, Sefton Park
Sefton Park Library
Former Barclays Bank, Aigburth Vale
Entrance to Fulwood Park
Albert public house
63 Lark Lane
Christ Church
Bandstand, Sefton Park
Drinking fountain, Sefton Park
Eros Fountain, Sefton Park
Iron bridge, Sefton Park
Samuel Smith Monument
Peter Pan Statue
William Rathbone Statue
The Dell, Sefton Park
Ullet Road Entrance, Sefton Park
Name Location Built Notes
Entrance Gates Aigburth Road
53°22′30″N 2°56′13″W / 53.37509°N 2.93708°W / 53.37509; -2.93708 (Entrance Gates, Aigburth Road)
c. 1870 This formed the entrance to Sefton Park from Aigburth Road, designed by Lewis Hornblower and Édouard André in Gothic style. In the centre is a screen containing the Liverpool coat of arms. This is flanked by granite piers, and three-bay arcades. On the top is a pavilion roof with iron cresting. On each side of the screen are two granite gate piers, with stone capitals and caps. The granite columns were removed from St George's Hall in the 1850s.[3][4]
Gate piers,
St Anne's Church
Aigburth Road
53°22′11″N 2°55′49″W / 53.36963°N 2.93032°W / 53.36963; -2.93032 (Gate piers, St Anne's Church)
1832 The gate piers were designed by Cunningham and Holme, who also designed the church. They are in two pairs, constructed in stone, and are in Neo-Norman style. They are octagonal, with features including arcading, corbels, and finials.[5][6]
Sefton Park Library Aigburth Road
53°22′43″N 2°56′50″W / 53.3786°N 2.9473°W / 53.3786; -2.9473 (Sefton Park Library)
1911 This was the last of the branch libraries designed by Thomas Shelmerdine, and is in Tudor Revival style. The ground floor is in stone, partly roughcast, and the upper parts are timber-framed. It has large brick chimneystacks. The library was opened by Andrew Carnegie, and contains a plaque to commemorate this.[7][8]
Barclays Bank 301 Aigburth Road,
2 Ashfield Road

53°22′24″N 2°56′02″W / 53.3733°N 2.9339°W / 53.3733; -2.9339 (Barclays Bank)
1902 This was designed by Willink and Thicknesse for the Bank of Liverpool. It is in red brick with stone dressings and has a slate roof. The bank is in two storeys with and attic, and has two bays facing each road, with a canted bay on the corner between them. Its features include large voussoirs above the ground floor windows, shaped gables, and an octagonal turret on the corner, with oculi and a copper cap.[9][10]
Presbytery,
St Clare's Church
Arundel Avenue
53°23′28″N 2°56′12″W / 53.3912°N 2.9366°W / 53.3912; -2.9366 (Presbytery, St Clare's Church)
1890 The presbytery was designed by Leonard Stokes, who also designed the church. It is in brick with a slate roof, and is attached to the northeast corner of the chancel. The building is in two storeys with casement windows, and is simply detailed.[11][12]
Four entrance piers Fulwood Park
53°22′28″N 2°56′15″W / 53.3744°N 2.9375°W / 53.3744; -2.9375 (Four entrance piers, Fulwood Park)
c. 1840 The gate piers stand at the entrance to Fulwood Park, They are in red sandstone, The outer two have a square plan, the other two are octagonal with a cornice and a cap. The gates are no longer present.[13]
Lodge 1A Fulwood Park
53°22′28″N 2°56′15″W / 53.37446°N 2.93738°W / 53.37446; -2.93738 (Lodge, Fulwood Park)
c. 1840 The lodge stands at the entrance to the private estate of Fulwood Park. It is built in sandstone, and has a stone slate roof. The entrance front is in three bays. The central bay projects forward under a gable and has two storeys. The lateral bays are in one storey, the left-hand bay containing a doorway. There are hood moulds over the doorway and the windows. To the southeast of the house is a garden gate enclosed in a stone ogee-headed arch flanked by columns, above which is a parapet with four trefoil openings.[14][15]
3 Fulwood Park
53°22′25″N 2°56′12″W / 53.3736°N 2.9368°W / 53.3736; -2.9368 (3 Fulwood Park)
c. 1840 A stuccoed house with a slate roof, later converted into flats. It is in two storeys with an attic, and has a front of five irregular bays. The second and fourth bays project forward. At the top of the building is a frieze and a cornice. The windows are sashes, those in the upper floor with arcaded balconies. In the fourth bay is a Tuscan porch with a balcony.[14][16]
4 Fulwood Park
53°22′22″N 2°56′21″W / 53.3729°N 2.9391°W / 53.3729; -2.9391 (4 Fulwood Park)
c. 1840 An asymmetrical stuccoed house with a slate roof. It has two storeys and a six-bay front, the fourth bay projecting forward with a canted bay window. The fifth and sixth bays form a bow window. In the ground floor the windows are casements, and in the upper floor they are sashes.[14][17]
5A and 5B Fulwood Park
53°22′24″N 2°56′14″W / 53.3733°N 2.9373°W / 53.3733; -2.9373 (5 and 5A Fulwood Park)
c. 1840 This originated as a single house, later divided into two houses. It is stuccoed, in one and two storeys, and has a seven-bay front. At the top of the building is a cornice and a parapet. The windows are sashes. In the second bay is a recessed porch with an Ionic colonnade and a balustrade. The fourth bay projects forward under a pediment. In the sixth bay is a Doric porch.[14][18]
Parklea 6 Fulwood Park
53°22′21″N 2°56′22″W / 53.3726°N 2.9394°W / 53.3726; -2.9394 (Parklea)
c. 1840 A stuccoed house with a hipped slate roof. It has an L-shaped plan, with two storeys and a three-bay front, the central bay protruding forward. The windows in the ground floor are round-headed, those in the upper floor have architraves and balconies. There is a central entrance with a fanlight.[14][19]
8 Fulwood Park
53°22′18″N 2°56′25″W / 53.3718°N 2.9403°W / 53.3718; -2.9403 (8 Fulwood Park)
c. 1840 A stuccoed house with a hipped slate roof. It has two storeys with four bays on the front and three on the sides. The end bay is recessed, and the windows are sashes. In the second bay is an entrance with a Doric porch with an architrave.[14][20]
9 and 9A Fulwood Park
53°22′20″N 2°56′19″W / 53.3721°N 2.9387°W / 53.3721; -2.9387 (9 and 9A Fulwood Park)
c. 1840 This originated as a single house, later divided into two houses. The building is stuccoed with slate roofs. It is symmetrical, in two storeys, and has five bays. The second and fourth bays project forward, and the end bays are recessed. The windows are sashes with architraves. At the top of the building are a frieze, a cornice, and a parapet.[14][21]
Osborne House 13 Fulwood Park
53°22′15″N 2°56′25″W / 53.3708°N 2.9402°W / 53.3708; -2.9402 (Osborne House)
c. 1840 A stuccoed house with a slate roof, it has two storeys and a five-bay front, the two end bays on each side projecting forward under a pediment. At the top of the building is an entablature. The entrance is in the second bay, and in the fifth bay is a long stair-window. The windows are sashes with architraves. On the side is a porch with Tuscan pilasters.[14][22]
15 Fulwood Park
53°22′12″N 2°56′29″W / 53.3699°N 2.9413°W / 53.3699; -2.9413 (15 Fulwood Park)
c. 1840 A stuccoed house with a slate roof, it has two storeys and a five-bay front. In the fifth bay is a two-storey canted bay window. The windows are sashes with architraves. The third and fourth bays contain a four-bay porch with a colonnade.[14][23]
17 and 17A Fulwood Park
53°22′11″N 2°56′30″W / 53.3696°N 2.9417°W / 53.3696; -2.9417 (17 and 17A Fulwood Park)
c. 1840 A stuccoed house with a slate roof, it has two storeys and a five-bay front. The first two bays have a one-bay forward projection, and the ground floor window in the fifth bay also projects. Above the ground floor is a cornice. At the top of the building is an entablature. The windows are sashes with architraves. The porch has a four-bay colonnade with a pediment.[14][24]
19 Fulwood Park
53°22′09″N 2°56′32″W / 53.3692°N 2.9421°W / 53.3692; -2.9421 (19 Fulwood Park)
c. 1840 A stuccoed house with a slate roof. It has three storeys and a five-bay front. The first bay projects forward and contains a two-storey canted bay window. At the top of the house is a frieze, and a cornice. The windows are casements with architraves. There is also a six-bay colonnade, and a 20th-century extension.[14][25]
21 Fulwood Park
53°22′08″N 2°56′33″W / 53.3688°N 2.9426°W / 53.3688; -2.9426 (21 Fulwood Park)
c. 1840 A stuccoed house with a slate roof. It has two storeys and a five-bay front, the first two bays being recessed. At the top of the building is a frieze, a cornice, and a panelled parapet. The windows are sashes with architraves. The porch has a four-bay colonnade.[14][26]
23 and 25 Fulwood Park
53°22′05″N 2°56′36″W / 53.3681°N 2.9432°W / 53.3681; -2.9432 (23 and 25 Fulwood Park)
c. 1840 A pair of houses with two storeys, each house having a four-bay front. The first, third, sixth and eighth bays project forward under gables with undulating bargeboards. The windows are sashes. Both houses have Tudor arched entrances. No 23 has a canted porch with a plain parapet, and No 25 has a gabled porch.[14][27]
Greenbank Lodge Greenbank Drive
53°23′23″N 2°55′46″W / 53.38982°N 2.92940°W / 53.38982; -2.92940 (Greenbank Lodge)
1878 A lodge to Sefton Park designed by Lewis Hornblower and Édouard André. It is in red brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. The lodge has two storeys, the upper storey being half-timbered. There are three bays, the outer two bays projecting forward under gables with decorative bargeboards. The windows are mullioned and transomed, and there is an oriel window in the first bay. On the left side are two half-dormers.[3][28]
Gateway Hadassah Grove
53°22′49″N 2°56′40″W / 53.38039°N 2.94456°W / 53.38039; -2.94456 (Gateway, Hadassah Grove)
1840s An entrance, later blocked, consisting of a segmental-headed stone arch. It incorporates paired pilasters and a cornice, and is gabled.[29][30]
2 Hadassah Grove
53°22′51″N 2°56′41″W / 53.3809°N 2.9448°W / 53.3809; -2.9448 (2 Hadassah Grove)
1840s (probable) A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has two storeys and three bays, with pilasters between the bays. All the windows have wedge lintels and are sashes. At the top of the house is a cornice and a frieze. In the first bay is a single-storey canted bay window.[29][31]
4 and 6 Hadassah Grove
53°22′51″N 2°56′40″W / 53.3808°N 2.9445°W / 53.3808; -2.9445 (4 and 6 Hadassah Grove)
1840s (probable) Two brick houses with stone dressings and slate roofs. They are in two storeys, and each house has three bays with angle pilasters. The windows have wedge lintels and are sashes. The central entrances, and the windows above them, have architraves and consoled cornices.[29][32]
7 and 9 Hadassah Grove
53°22′52″N 2°56′41″W / 53.3812°N 2.9448°W / 53.3812; -2.9448 (7 and 9 Hadassah Grove)
1840s (probable) Two brick houses with slate roofs. They are in two storeys, and each house has three bays. All the windows have wedge lintels and most are sashes, while two are casements. Each central entrance has panelled pilasters, a frieze and a cornice.[29][33]
8 and 10 Hadassah Grove
53°22′51″N 2°56′40″W / 53.3807°N 2.9444°W / 53.3807; -2.9444 (8 and 10 Hadassah Grove)
1840s (probable) Two brick houses with stone dressings and a hipped slate roof. They are in two storeys, and each house has three bays. Along the top of the house is a cornice and a frieze. The windows have wedge lintels and are sashes. Both houses have ground floor canted bay windows.[29][34]
11 and 13 Hadassah Grove
53°22′52″N 2°56′41″W / 53.3811°N 2.9446°W / 53.3811; -2.9446 (11 and 13 Hadassah Grove)
1840s (probable) Two stuccoed houses with a slate roof, in two storeys and three bays. Along the top of the building is a cornice and a frieze. The windows are all sashes. Both houses have a canted bay window, and the entrances are flanked by pilasters.[29][35]
14 Hadassah Grove
53°22′50″N 2°56′41″W / 53.3805°N 2.9446°W / 53.3805; -2.9446 (14 Hadassah Grove)
1840s (probable) A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has two storeys and three bays, with pilasters and dosserets between the bays. All the windows have wedge lintels and are sashes. At the top of the house is a cornice. The central round-headed doorway has a Doric doorcase with fluted columns, a reeded frieze, and a fanlight.[29][36]
17 Hadassah Grove
53°22′51″N 2°56′38″W / 53.3808°N 2.9440°W / 53.3808; -2.9440 (17 Hadassah Grove)
1840s (probable) A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has two storeys, with an entrance front of three bays and two bays facing the street. The windows have wedge lintels and are sashes. On the front is a verandah, behind which is a doorway with an architrave and a consoled cornice. Attached to the house is a stone screen. This has a central entrance with flanking panelled pilasters and gabled finials.[29][37]
19 Hadassah Grove
53°22′49″N 2°56′40″W / 53.3804°N 2.9444°W / 53.3804; -2.9444 (19 Hadassah Grove)
1840s (probable) A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has two storeys, with an entrance front of three bays and two bays facing the street. The windows have wedge lintels and are sashes. The entrance is round-headed with a Doric doorcase. There is an attached screen wall containing an entrance with pilasters and finials.[38]
The Bridge Ibbotsons Lane
53°22′54″N 2°55′49″W / 53.3817°N 2.9304°W / 53.3817; -2.9304 (The Bridge)
c. 1880 A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has two storeys with an attic, and an entrance front of three bays. On each side of the entrance is a rectangular bay window. The windows are mullioned and transomed. The entrance is buttressed, and above it is an oriel window. The gables contain timbering and pargeted panels.[39]
Albert public house Lark Lane
53°22′54″N 2°56′42″W / 53.3817°N 2.9449°W / 53.3817; -2.9449 (Albert public house)
1873 A public house built for the brewer Robert Cain. It is a stuccoed building with a slate roof, in two storeys and an attic. There are five bays on Lark Lane, four on Pelham Grove, and a canted bay between them. The main entrance is in the canted bay, above which is a diapered panel, and a gable inscribed with "THE ALBERT". Other features include an oriel window, and a canted two-storey bay window with a finial. Included in the designation are four lamp holders.[29][40]
Gate Lark Lane
53°22′57″N 2°56′38″W / 53.3826°N 2.9438°W / 53.3826; -2.9438 (Gate, Lark Lane)
c. 1870 Four stone gate piers at an entrance to Sefton Park in Gothic style, probably designed by Lewis Hornblower and Édouard André. The piers are square in section, with foliated cornice s and pyramidal caps. The inner piers have lanterns, and the outer piers have fleurons.[3][41]
63 Lark Lane
53°22′52″N 2°56′46″W / 53.3811°N 2.9462°W / 53.3811; -2.9462 (63 Lark Lane)
1884 This originated as the Christ Church Institute, and was later converted into a restaurant. It is built in brick and timber framing, with a tiled roof. It has two storeys with an attic, and a three-bay front. The ground floor has a central window, with entrances in the lateral bays. The upper storey is jettied, with a clock above the central window. The attic is further jettied, and contains panels with stencilled decoration. The windows are casements.[29][42]
Christ Church Linnet Lane
53°23′05″N 2°56′55″W / 53.3848°N 2.9486°W / 53.3848; -2.9486 (Christ Church)
1867–71 The church was designed by Culshaw and Sumners in Decorated style. It is constructed in stone, with slate roofs. It consists of a nave with a clerestory, aisles, a chancel with a south vestry and a north tower with a broach spire. At the west end are diagonal corner porches. The nave has a hammerbeam roof.[43][44]
Iron Bridge Mossley Hill Drive
53°22′52″N 2°55′54″W / 53.38120°N 2.93160°W / 53.38120; -2.93160 (Iron Bridge)
c. 1870 A cast iron bridge caring the road over a steam and a ravine designed by Lewis Hornblower and Édouard André. Octagonal columns support lattice girders. At the ends are brick piers; they have stone cornices and ornamental iron lamps.[45][46]
Gledhill 1 Mossley Hill Drive
53°23′03″N 2°55′56″W / 53.3843°N 2.9323°W / 53.3843; -2.9323 (Gledhill)
1881 A house designed by James Francis Doyle, built in red brick with sandstone dressings, some timber framing, and a tiled roof. It is asymmetrical in an irregularly-shaped L-plan, it has two storeys with attics, and an irregular arrangement of bays. The windows are mullioned and transomed. Features include very tall chimneys, gables with pargeted panels, an oriel window, dormers, a two storey polygonal bay window, and an entrance with a four-centred arch.[47][48]
2 Mossley Hill Drive
53°23′02″N 2°55′56″W / 53.3838°N 2.9321°W / 53.3838; -2.9321 (2 Mossley Hill Drive)
1880s A house in common brick with dressings in red brick and terracotta, and a tiled roof. It has two storeys with an attic, and a four-bay front. The first and fourth bays project forward, and have tile-hung gables. In the ground floor are stone cross windows, the windows in the upper floor are sashes, and there are dormers in the attic.[49]
3 and 4 Mossley Hill Drive
53°23′00″N 2°55′55″W / 53.3833°N 2.9319°W / 53.3833; -2.9319 (3 and 4 Mossley Hill Drive)
1880s Two houses in common brick with red brick and stone dressings. They have a nine-bay front. The first bay projects forward and has a pyramidal roof with a finial, and the end bay contains a two-storey canted bay window. All the windows are sashes. Other features include pebbledashed gables, and dormers with pargeted gables.[50]
5 Mossley Hill Drive
53°22′59″N 2°55′54″W / 53.3830°N 2.9316°W / 53.3830; -2.9316 (5 Mossley Hill Drive)
1881 A brick house with stone dressings and a tiled roof. It has two storeys with an attic, and a three-bay front. Most of the windows are mullioned. The first bay has a timber-framed gable containing a six-light window. The central bay projects forward, it has a doorway with pilasters and an entablature, and a gable with terracotta diapering. The end bay is recessed, and has a two-storey canted bay window, and a gabled dormer.[51]
Duffus 6 Mossley Hill Drive
53°22′57″N 2°55′53″W / 53.3825°N 2.9315°W / 53.3825; -2.9315 (Duffus)
1880s A house in common brick with red brick and stone dressings, and a tiled roof. It has two storeys with an attic, and a three-bay front. In the central bay is a canted bay window with a parapet containing terracotta panels. The windows in the ground floor are casements, those in the upper floor are sashes, and in the roof are dormers.[52]
Bridge House 7 Mossley Hill Drive
53°22′56″N 2°55′53″W / 53.3821°N 2.9313°W / 53.3821; -2.9313 (Bridge House)
1870s A house in common brick with dressings in red brick and stone, and a tiled roof. It has two storeys and an attic, and fronts with three and four bays. The windows have mullions. It elaborately decorated with features including terracotta panels, attic windows with tympana and pediments containing swags, and gables in a variety of shapes.[53]
Railings and gate piers,
St Michael's Church
St Michael's Church Road
53°22′36″N 2°57′01″W / 53.37666°N 2.95017°W / 53.37666; -2.95017 (Railings and gate piers, St Michael's Church)
1815 The iron railings run between the road and the churchyard; they and the gates have spear heads. The gate piers and the piers at the ends of the railings are also in iron and are decorated with panels, and have crocketed finials.[54]
Arnewood 4 St Michael's Church Road
53°22′36″N 2°57′03″W / 53.3767°N 2.9507°W / 53.3767; -2.9507 (Arnewood)
c. 1815 A stuccoed house with a slate roof, it has two storeys and a three-bay front. On the front are pilasters, and at the top is a frieze. In the first bay is a canted bay window. The other windows have architraves, and all are sashes. At the entrance is a Doric aediculae.[55]
Vicarage 6 St Michael's Church Road
53°22′35″N 2°57′04″W / 53.3765°N 2.9510°W / 53.3765; -2.9510 (Vicarage)
Early 19th century A stuccoed house with a slate roof, it has two storeys and a three-bay front. On the front are pilasters, and at the top is a frieze. In the ground floor are canted bay windows with a cornice and a pierced parapet. All the windows are sashes. The gate and stone piers are included in the listing.[56]
Aigburth Lodge Sefton Park
53°22′31″N 2°56′12″W / 53.3752°N 2.9366°W / 53.3752; -2.9366 (Aigburth Lodge)
1874 The lodge stands at the entrance to the park from Aigburth Road, and was designed by Lewis Hornblower and Édouard André. It is built in red brick with decoration in blue brick, stone and timbering. It has a steep slate roof, and an L-shaped plan with a timber-framed porch in the angle. There are two storeys, and its features include oriel windows, half-dormers with balconies, and gables with decorative bargeboards.[3][57]
Bandstand Sefton Park
53°22′56″N 2°56′17″W / 53.38229°N 2.93813°W / 53.38229; -2.93813 (Bandstand, Sefton Park)
Late 19th century The bandstand is in the middle of the lake. It is octagonal with a brick base, and is surrounded by iron railings. The bandstand consists of thin iron columns supporting a red-tiled pagoda roof. On top of the roof is a lantern and an elaborate weathervane.[58]
Drinking Fountain Sefton Park
53°22′32″N 2°56′15″W / 53.37561°N 2.93739°W / 53.37561; -2.93739 (Drinking Fountain, Sefton Park)
c. 1870 This fountain stands near the south end of the lake, and was designed by Lewis Hornblower and Édouard André. It is constructed in sandstone, and is in High Victorian Gothic style. The fountain has a square plan, and contains four bowls, and entwined dolphins under a canopy supported by marble columns.[59]
Drinking Fountain Sefton Park
53°22′59″N 2°56′21″W / 53.38300°N 2.93907°W / 53.38300; -2.93907 (Drinking Fountain, Sefton Park)
1932 This contains a copy of the figure of Eros from the Shaftesbury Memorial in Piccadilly Circus, which was designed by Alfred Gilbert; it is signed A. B. Burton. It stands on an octagonal bronze base containing a continuous trough, above which are eight bowls and numerous water jets. The base is decorated in Art Nouveau style and depicts fish and baby mermaids.[60]
Grotto (northeast) Sefton Park
53°23′16″N 2°56′15″W / 53.38767°N 2.93762°W / 53.38767; -2.93762 (Grotto (northeast))
c. 1870 The grotto is on the west side of the lake, and was probably designed by Lewis Hornblower and Édouard André. It is built in large blocks of stone. It consists of a chamber with three entrances, a central pier, and steps leading up to an opening in the roof.[61]
Grotto (west) Sefton Park
53°22′40″N 2°56′19″W / 53.37767°N 2.93860°W / 53.37767; -2.93860 (Grotto (west))
c. 1870 The grotto is on the west side of the lake, and was probably designed by Lewis Hornblower and Édouard André. It is built in large blocks of stone in a naturalistic style.[62]
Monument to Samuel Smith Sefton Park
53°23′10″N 2°56′43″W / 53.38602°N 2.94530°W / 53.38602; -2.94530 (Monument to Samuel Smith, Sefton Park)
1909 The monument consists of an obelisk designed by C. J. Allen as a memorial to the local M. P. Samuel Smith. It is constructed in granite, stands on a square plinth with an inscription in bronze, and contains panels containing sculpted figures.[63][64]
Princes Lodge Sefton Park
53°23′12″N 2°56′53″W / 53.38672°N 2.94792°W / 53.38672; -2.94792 (Princes Lodge)
1874 The lodge stands at the main entrance to the park, and was designed by Lewis Hornblower and Édouard André. It is in red brick and sandstone with half-timbering, and is in cottage orné style. The lodge is in two storeys, and has a T-shaped plan with a porch in the angle. To the left of the porch is a canted bay with mullioned and transomed windows. Facing Ullet Road is a canted bay window with a jettied first floor.[3][65]
Shelter (east) Sefton Park
53°22′43″N 2°56′17″W / 53.37865°N 2.93818°W / 53.37865; -2.93818 (Shelter (east))
c. 1870 The shelter is on the east side of the lake, and was probably designed by Lewis Hornblower and Édouard André. It is wooden, standing on a brick base, and has a slate roof. Its plan is rectangular, and it has open sides containing arches with cinquefoil heads and trellis work.[66]
Shelter (west) Sefton Park
53°22′34″N 2°56′18″W / 53.37622°N 2.93839°W / 53.37622; -2.93839 (Shelter (west))
c. 1870 The shelter is on the west side of the lake, and was probably designed by Lewis Hornblower and Édouard André. It is wooden, standing on a brick base, and has a slate roof. Its plan is rectangular, and it has open sides containing arches with cinquefoil heads and trellis work.[67]
Statue of Peter Pan Sefton Park
53°22′53″N 2°56′08″W / 53.38148°N 2.93567°W / 53.38148; -2.93567 (Statue of Peter Pan)
1928 A replica of the Peter Pan statue in Kensington Gardens, designed by George Frampton. It is in bronze, and depicts Peter Pan standing astride a tree trunk decorated with images of fairies and small animals.[63][68]
Statue of William Rathbone Sefton Park
53°22′48″N 2°56′13″W / 53.38001°N 2.93692°W / 53.38001; -2.93692 (Statue of William Rathbone)
1877 The marble statue is of William Rathbone V who died in 1868. It was begun by J. H. Foyle, and completed by Thomas Brock. The statue stands on granite steps and a plinth. Originally there were three reliefs by Brock representing education, industry and charity, but these have been removed.[63][69]
The Dell Sefton Park
53°22′52″N 2°55′56″W / 53.3812°N 2.9323°W / 53.3812; -2.9323 (The Dell, Sefton Park)
c. 1870 A series of four pools linked by a stream, bounded by sandstone rocks and slabs. Some of the slabs are overhanging to create waterfalls. The stonework was designed by M. Combaz.[63][70]
Tunnel Sefton Park
53°22′46″N 2°56′21″W / 53.37935°N 2.93926°W / 53.37935; -2.93926 (Tunnel, Sefton Park)
c. 1870 A short tunnel taking one footpath under another. It was probably designed by Lewis Hornblower and Édouard André. The tunnel is constructed in large blocks of stone, and has a naturalistic style.[71]
Ullet Road entrance Sefton Park
53°23′13″N 2°56′52″W / 53.38688°N 2.94766°W / 53.38688; -2.94766 (Ullet Road entrance, Sefton Park)
1875 Standing at the main entrance to the park and designed by Thomas Shelmerdine, this consists of a screen flanked by gate piers, all in stone. The base is buttressed with arched recesses. It supports three columns, the central one being slim and in sandstone, the lateral two being broader, and in granite. These carry a slate roof with iron cresting. The four piers are in granite with conical caps, three of them carrying lamps.[3][72]
3 Southwood Road,
2 Alpass Road

53°22′37″N 2°57′04″W / 53.3769°N 2.9511°W / 53.3769; -2.9511 (3 Southwood Road)
Early 19th century A stuccoed house with a hipped slate roof. It is in two storeys, and has fronts of three and four bays. All the windows are sashes with architraves. The entrance is in an enclosed porch with panelled pilasters, a frieze, a cornice, and a gable.[73]
16 and 18 Southwood Road
53°22′38″N 2°57′05″W / 53.3771°N 2.9514°W / 53.3771; -2.9514 (16 and 18 Southwood Road)
1830s A pair of stuccoed houses with a slate roof. They have two storeys, and each house is in two bays. The outer bays have canted bay windows, between which is a five-bay iron loggia. At the top of the building is a frieze and a cornice. The windows are casements.[74]
20 Southwood Road
53°22′37″N 2°57′05″W / 53.3770°N 2.9515°W / 53.3770; -2.9515 (20 Southwood Road)
Early 19th century A stuccoed house with a slate roof, it is in two storeys, and has a three-bay front. All the windows have architraves; in the ground floor they are casements, and in the upper floor they are sashes. The entrance is on the side.[75]
Norwegian Fishermans' Church 22 Southwood Road
53°22′35″N 2°57′08″W / 53.3764°N 2.9522°W / 53.3764; -2.9522 (Norwegian Fishermans' Church)
Early 19th century This originated as a house. It is stuccoed with a slate roof, and has two storeys and an attic. The building has fronts of three and four bays, the end bays projecting forward under gables. The windows are sashes with Tudor arched heads.[76]
24 Southwood Road
53°22′35″N 2°57′08″W / 53.3764°N 2.9522°W / 53.3764; -2.9522 (24 Southwood Road)
Early 19th century A stuccoed house with a hipped slate roof. It is in two storeys, and has a three-bay front, the central bay projecting forward. At the angles are pilasters. To the left of the central porch is a rectangular bay window, and above the porch is a window with an architrave, a frieze, and a cornice. All the windows are sashes.[77]
Church Hall,
St Agnes' Church
Ullet Road
53°23′24″N 2°56′24″W / 53.3899°N 2.9400°W / 53.3899; -2.9400 (Church Hall, St Agnes' Church)
1887 (probable) The hall stands behind the church. It is in brick with a tiled roof, and was designed by Norman Shaw in Gothic style. It is a simple building, linked to the church by a passage, and contains lean-to aisles and a clerestory.[43][78]
Wall and gates,
Ullet Road Unitarian Church
Ullet Road
53°23′22″N 2°56′16″W / 53.38954°N 2.93776°W / 53.38954; -2.93776 (Wall and gates, Ullet Road Unitarian Church)
c. 1898 The walls extend from Cheltenham Avenue, along Ullet Road, and into York Avenue. They were designed by Thomas Worthington, and are in brick, with a stone plinth, coping, and dressings. They contain three sets of wrought iron gates.[79]
Ullet Grange 36 Ullet Road
53°23′13″N 2°56′48″W / 53.3870°N 2.9467°W / 53.3870; -2.9467 (Ullet Grange, Liverpool)
1870s A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It is in three storeys, and has an entrance front of four bays. Two of the bays project forward, and have gables with timbering and bargeboards. The garden front has three bays, a canted bay window with a balcony above, and half-dormers. Most of the windows are mullioned and transomed.[80]
38 Ullet Road
53°23′14″N 2°56′47″W / 53.3872°N 2.9464°W / 53.3872; -2.9464 (38 Ullet Road, Liverpool)
1860s A stuccoed house with a slate roof. It has four storeys, and a three-bay front. The windows and surrounds vary, some with architraves and pediments, and one containing seven round-headed lights. At the centre of the rear is a two-storey bow window. The entrance porch has a Doric-style colonnade with a balustraded balcony above.[81]
40 Ullet Road
53°23′15″N 2°56′46″W / 53.3874°N 2.9462°W / 53.3874; -2.9462 (40 Ullet Road, Liverpool)
1860s A stuccoed house with a slate roof. It has three storeys, and a five-bay front, the central bay being recessed. The windows are sashes with architraves. At the top of the house is a frieze and a cornice. In the first bay is a bay window. In the third bay is a five-bay blind arcade with archivolts and keystones, above which is a Venetian window with busts in roundels, and a pediment.[82]
42 Ullet Road
53°23′15″N 2°56′45″W / 53.3876°N 2.9459°W / 53.3876; -2.9459 (42 Ullet Road, Liverpool)
1860s A stuccoed house with a slate roof. It has three storeys, and a five-bay front. The windows are sashes and have architraves. In the middle bay is a five-bay blind arcade with archivolts and keystones. At the top of the house is a frieze and a cornice. The entrance is in the fourth bay, and has a rusticated surround.[83]
Restaurant 44 Ullet Road
53°23′16″N 2°56′44″W / 53.3877°N 2.9455°W / 53.3877; -2.9455 (44 Ullet Road, Liverpool)
1870s Originally a house, later converted into a restaurant, it is built in common brick with dressings in red brick and stone, and has a slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement, and a front of three bays. Most of the windows are mullioned and transomed. Features include a tower with an octagonal turret surmounted by a conical roof, a Tudor arched entrance, gables with timbering and decorative bargeboards, and, at the rear, a balustraded terrace.[84]
Gates and gate piers 44 Ullet Road
53°23′17″N 2°56′45″W / 53.38796°N 2.94585°W / 53.38796; -2.94585 (Gates and gatepiers, 44 Ullet Road, Liverpool)
1870s The gates are wooden, between four stone gate piers. The piers have cornices decorated with Tudor flowers. They are castellated and have ogival caps with fish-scale pattern, crockets and fleurons.[85]
Sefton Court Mansions 50 Ullet Road
53°23′18″N 2°56′36″W / 53.3884°N 2.9433°W / 53.3884; -2.9433 (Sefton Court Mansions)
1860s A stuccoed house with a hipped slate roof. It is mainly in three storeys with a basement, and has fronts of four and three bays. In the first bay is a canted bay window. The windows are sashes, those in the first floor with balustraded balconies. The porch has Doric columns, and above it is a pedimented window. The interior was remodelled in 1912, with decoration by the Bromsgrove Guild.[86]
Holt House 54 Ullet Road
53°23′19″N 2°56′24″W / 53.3887°N 2.9400°W / 53.3887; -2.9400 (Holt House)
c. 1870 The house was built for Robert Durning Holt, ship owner and first Lord Mayor of Liverpool. It is in red brick with sandstone dressings, and has a Welsh slate roof. The house has basically an L-shaped plan, and is in two storeys with a basement and attics. The entrance porch has Tuscan columns carrying an entablature and a frieze. The windows are sashes. Other features include canted bay windows, a Diocletian window and, at the top of the house, a parapet and a domed lantern. The attached garden walls are included in the listing.[87]
Wall and gate piers,
Holt House
54 Ullet Road
53°23′21″N 2°56′25″W / 53.38911°N 2.94041°W / 53.38911; -2.94041 (Wall and gate piers, Holt House)
c. 1879 The wall and gate piers are in sandstone. The wall extends along Ullet Road and around the garden of Holt House. There are two pairs of gate piers, all of which are panelled with pyramidal caps.[88]
Kelton Woodlands Road
53°22′28″N 2°55′34″W / 53.3744°N 2.9260°W / 53.3744; -2.9260 (Kelton)
Early 19th century A stuccoed house with a hipped slate roof. It has two storeys, and a three-bay front, the central bay projecting forward. At the top of the house is a frieze and a cornice. Other than one casement window, all the windows are sashes. The porch is in Ionic style, with paired columns. There have been later extensions.[89]

See also[edit]

References and notes[edit]

Notes

  1. ^ These figures are taken from a search in the National Heritage List for England in May 2013, and are subject to variation as further buildings are listed, grades are revised, or buildings are delisted.

Citations

  1. ^ Listed Buildings, Historic England, retrieved 25 March 2015 
  2. ^ Historic England, "Sefton Park (1000999)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 9 September 2013 
  3. ^ a b c d e f Pollard & Pevsner (2006), p. 453
  4. ^ Historic England, "Entrance gates, corner Aigburth Road and Mossley Hill Drive, Liverpool (1356243)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 September 2013 
  5. ^ Pollard & Pevsner (2006), p. 380
  6. ^ Historic England, "Gate piers to Saint Anne's church, Liverpool (1068406)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 6 September 2013 
  7. ^ Pollard & Pevsner (2006), p. 451
  8. ^ Historic England, "Sefton Park Library, including boundary railings and gates, Liverpool (1409848)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 29 September 2013 
  9. ^ Pollard & Pevsner (2006), p. 385
  10. ^ Historic England, "Barclay's Bank, Liverpool (1068400)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 6 September 2013 
  11. ^ Pollard & Pevsner (2006), p. 449
  12. ^ Historic England, "Presbytery adjoining Church of St. Clare, Liverpool (1068394)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 6 September 2013 
  13. ^ Historic England, "4 entrance piers, Liverpool (1355150)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 September 2013 
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Pollard & Pevsner (2006), p. 384
  15. ^ Historic England, "Lodge, 1A Fulwood Park, Liverpool (1068246)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 6 September 2013 
  16. ^ Historic England, "3 Fulwood Park, Liverpool (1356342)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 5 September 2013 
  17. ^ Historic England, "4 Fulwood Park, Liverpool (1068210)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 5 September 2013 
  18. ^ Historic England, "5 and 5A Fulwood Park, Liverpool (1355152)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 September 2013 
  19. ^ Historic England, "Parklea, 6 Fulwood Park, Liverpool (1356366)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 September 2013 
  20. ^ Historic England, "8 Fulwood Park, Liverpool (1068211)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 5 September 2013 
  21. ^ Historic England, "9 and 9A Fulwood Park, Liverpool (1068247)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 6 September 2013 
  22. ^ Historic England, "Osborne House, Liverpool (1025039)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 4 September 2013 
  23. ^ Historic England, "15 Fulwood Park, Liverpool (1356343)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 September 2013 
  24. ^ Historic England, "17 and 17A Fulwood Park, Liverpool (1025043)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 4 September 2013 
  25. ^ Historic England, "19 Fulwood Park, Liverpool (1068248)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 6 September 2013 
  26. ^ Historic England, "21 Fulwood Park, Liverpool (1068209)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 September 2013 
  27. ^ Historic England, "23 and 25 Fulwood Park, Liverpool (1356365)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 September 2013 
  28. ^ Historic England, "Greenbank Lodge, Sefton Park (1068204)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 5 September 2013 
  29. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Pollard & Pevsner (2006), p. 455
  30. ^ Historic England, "Gateway at south end of road, Hadassah Grove, Liverpool (1068208)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 5 September 2013 
  31. ^ Historic England, "2 Hadassah Grove, Liverpool (1075201)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 7 September 2013 
  32. ^ Historic England, "4 and 6 Hadassah Grove, Liverpool (1343614)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 September 2013 
  33. ^ Historic England, "7 and 9 Hadassah Grove, Liverpool (1068207)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 5 September 2013 
  34. ^ Historic England, "8 and 10 Hadassah Grove, Liverpool (1075202)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 7 September 2013 
  35. ^ Historic England, "11 and 13 Hadassah Grove, Liverpool (1298786)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 September 2013 
  36. ^ Historic England, "14 Hadassah Grove, Liverpool (1343615)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 September 2013 
  37. ^ Historic England, "17 Hadassah Grove, Liverpool (1356364)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 September 2013 
  38. ^ Historic England, "19 Hadassah Grove, Liverpool (1298810)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 September 2013 
  39. ^ Historic England, "The Bridge, Liverpool (1343638)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 September 2013 
  40. ^ Historic England, "The Albert Public House including lamp holders, Liverpool (1084204)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 7 September 2013 
  41. ^ Historic England, "Gate to Sefton Park at north end of street, Liverpool (1346274)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 September 2013 
  42. ^ Historic England, "63 Lark Lane, Liverpool (1346273)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 September 2013 
  43. ^ a b Pollard & Pevsner (2006), p. 448
  44. ^ Historic England, "Christ Church, Liverpool (1346251)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 September 2013 
  45. ^ Pollard & Pevsner (2006), pp. 453–454
  46. ^ Historic England, "Iron bridge between Ibbotsons Lane and Queens Drive junctions, Sefton Park (1070640)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 7 September 2013 
  47. ^ Pollard & Pevsner (2006), pp. 454–455
  48. ^ Historic England, "Gledhill, Liverpool (1070638)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 7 September 2013 
  49. ^ Historic England, "2 Mossley Hill Drive, Liverpool (1293210)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 September 2013 
  50. ^ Historic England, "3 and 4 Mossley Hill Drive, Liverpool (1363075)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 September 2013 
  51. ^ Historic England, "5 Mossley Hill Drive, Liverpool (1293214)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 September 2013 
  52. ^ Historic England, "Duffus, Liverpool (1070639)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 7 September 2013 
  53. ^ Historic England, "Bridge House, Liverpool (1208305)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 7 September 2013 
  54. ^ Historic England, "Iron railings and 2 gate piers at St. Michaels Church, Liverpool (1073472)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 7 September 2013 
  55. ^ Historic England, "Arnewood, Liverpool (1073475)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 7 September 2013 
  56. ^ Historic England, "Vicarage with garden wall and 4 piers, Liverpool (1073476)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 7 September 2013 
  57. ^ Historic England, "Aigburth Lodge, Sefton Park (1205140)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 4 September 2013 
  58. ^ Historic England, "Bandstand on island in lake, Sefton Park (1062525)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 4 September 2013 
  59. ^ Historic England, "Drinking fountain at south end of lake, Sefton Park (1073452)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 7 September 2013 
  60. ^ Historic England, "Drinking fountain at north end of lake, Sefton Park (1062527)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 4 September 2013 
  61. ^ Historic England, "Grotto to northeast of lake, Sefton Park (1360234)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 September 2013 
  62. ^ Historic England, "Grotto to west of lake, Sefton Park (1073454)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 7 September 2013 
  63. ^ a b c d Pollard & Pevsner (2006), p. 454
  64. ^ Historic England, "Monument to Samuel Smith, Sefton Park (1062528)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 4 September 2013 
  65. ^ Historic England, "Princes Lodge, Sefton Park (1063314)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 4 September 2013 
  66. ^ Historic England, "Shelter on east side of lake, Sefton Park (1210106)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 7 September 2013 
  67. ^ Historic England, "Shelter on west side of lake, Sefton Park (1073453)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 7 September 2013 
  68. ^ Historic England, "Statue of Peter Pan, Sefton Park (1062529)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 9 September 2013 
  69. ^ Historic England, "Statue of William Rathbone, Sefton Park (1073451)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 7 September 2013 
  70. ^ Historic England, "The Dell, Sefton Park (1255551)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 9 September 2013 
  71. ^ Historic England, "Tunnel to northwest of lake, Sefton Park (1062524)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 4 September 2013 
  72. ^ Historic England, "Entrance to Sefton Park, Liverpool (1218258)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 7 September 2013 
  73. ^ Historic England, "3 Southwood Road, Liverpool (1359835)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 September 2013 
  74. ^ Historic England, "16 and 18 Southwood Road, Liverpool (1063320)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 4 September 2013 
  75. ^ Historic England, "20 Southwood Road, Liverpool (1063321)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 5 September 2013 
  76. ^ Historic England, "Norwegian Fishermens' Church, Liverpool (1359836)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 September 2013 
  77. ^ Historic England, "24 Southwood Road, Liverpool (1063322)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 5 September 2013 
  78. ^ Historic England, "Saint Agnes' Church Hall behind church, Liverpool (1063313)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 4 September 2013 
  79. ^ Historic England, "Wall and gates to Unitarian Chapel and church hall, Liverpool (1292058)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 7 September 2013 
  80. ^ Historic England, "Ullet Grange, Liverpool (1063276)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 4 September 2013 
  81. ^ Historic England, "38 Ullet Road, Liverpool (1063277)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 4 September 2013 
  82. ^ Historic England, "40 Ullet Road, Liverpool (1359892)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 4 September 2013 
  83. ^ Historic England, "42 Ullet Road, Liverpool (1063278)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 4 September 2013 
  84. ^ Historic England, "Lau's Cantonese style restaurant, 44 Ullet Road, Liverpool (1063279)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 4 September 2013 
  85. ^ Historic England, "Gates and gatepiers to No 44 Ullet Road, Liverpool (1359854)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 September 2013 
  86. ^ Historic England, "Sefton Court Mansions, Liverpool (1063280)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 9 September 2013 
  87. ^ Historic England, "Holt House and attached garden walls, Liverpool (1387300)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 9 September 2013 
  88. ^ Historic England, "Boundary wall and gatepiers at Holt House, Liverpool (1387901)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 9 September 2013 
  89. ^ Historic England, "Kelton (House of Providence), Liverpool (1218675)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 7 September 2013 

Sources

External links[edit]