Graffiti on the Train

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Graffiti on the Train
Stereophonics band members sitting alongside each other on a wall. Name of the band and album is written above them against a dull, beige wall.
Studio album by
Released4 March 2013 (2013-03-04)
RecordedJanuary 2011–October 2012
StudioICP Studios (Brussels)
Stylus Studios (London)
Genre
Length43:04
Label
Producer
Stereophonics chronology
Keep Calm and Carry On
(2009)
Graffiti on the Train
(2013)
Keep the Village Alive
(2015)
Singles from Graffiti on the Train
  1. "In a Moment"
    Released: 4 November 2012
  2. "Indian Summer"
    Released: 18 January 2013
  3. "Graffiti on the Train"
    Released: 13 May 2013
  4. "We Share the Same Sun"
    Released: 12 August 2013
Vinyl and deluxe edition cover
An oil painting by Stephen Goddard. Name of the band and album is written along the top of the painting.

Graffiti on the Train is the eighth studio album by Welsh rock band Stereophonics. Produced by the group's lead-singer and guitarist Kelly Jones and Jim Lowe, it was released on 4 March 2013 on their own Stylus Records. It was the first Stereophonics album since Keep Calm and Carry On (2009), marking the first time they had not released a record within two years. It was intended for an October 2012 release date and took nearly two years to complete.[4] This is the last record to feature drummer Javier Weyler, who was officially replaced by Jamie Morrison on 24 September 2012.

The album's earliest idea spawned when children were running across the singer's rooftop in order to access the trains and spray paint graffiti on one of them. With 40 unfinished song ideas, the band composed 30 of these to be released as an album trilogy but decided against the idea, instead releasing a follow up (intended to be the second part) on 11 September 2015. Also planned that year is the go-ahead on production for a screenplay of the same name Jones is developing. British film composer David Arnold worked alongside the producers to compose three of the song's orchestral arrangements; the record is seen as a shift in the group's musical style as it incorporates cinematic-style music. Recording sessions were primarily performed at ICP Studios in Brussels, Belgium in order to concentrate more on the record.

The album was released to a critical success, being called one of their best albums to date; commercial performance contrasted however when compared with previous albums, selling over 300,000 copies in the UK and peaking at number three in the country's albums chart. It produced the band's best performing single since 2007, "Indian Summer", and was nominated for the World's Best Album in 2014. Graffiti on the Train was supported by a world tour named after the album from 2012–2013 and became the tenth most popular tour of 2013.

Background and writing[edit]

I wanted to change the way we worked. Find new ways of writing, new ways of listening. We toured every year for 16 years. We always seemed to be in a rush to record an album and get back out there, and not let the band slip down the ladder. It was nice to take time off, take the kids to school, see your mates, and come in here every day with no pressure.

Kelly Jones[5]

In November 2009, Stereophonics released their seventh studio album which attracted a mixed response from critics and became a commercial failure.[6] Lead-singer Kelly Jones has blamed the low sales on Universal Music Group's choice to release the record during the time The X-Factor and other artists were releasing albums.[6] After completing their world tour to support the album in 2010, Stereophonics took a break from recording and releasing an album every two years,[5] resulting in the longest time gap in between two album release dates.[7] Around this time their contract with Mercury Records ended, giving the band a chance to make a fresh start. During Christmas 2010, Jones had concerns that he wouldn't be able to write new songs.[8] Jone explained to Neil McCormick of The Daily Telegraph that his writing references and influences are different from what they were in the past.[5]

Writing for Graffiti on the Train started when Jones thought children were trying to break into his house via the roof. When he caught them one time they told him they were trying to get to the railway behind his house to spray graffiti on a train. The idea that they were trying to spray a love message on the train for a girl who gets the train every morning stuck with Jones and subsequently appeared in the title track.[9] "Violins and Tambourines" was written as a narration of a troubled man who is struggling with his inner demons.[10] "Been Caught Cheating" is a blues song inspired by the late Amy Winehouse. Winehouse was interested for Jones to send the song to her but he never did.[11] "In a Moment" is about finding hope in life "when you feel a bit lost and stuck and you don't know how to get out of it and then there's a glimmer of hope that helps you pull through it," Jones told NME.[12] With the exception of the second verse, the song is written in third person view.[13] When being interviewed by Clayton Moore of The Marquee, Jones explained themes featured in the album are: fear, fearlessness and hope.[14] He also stated the overall theme is "going over some very difficult obstacles and coming out on the other side a better man."[14]

Recording and production[edit]

The record was produced by Jones and Jim Lowe.[13] Jones has been producing for the band since You Gotta Go There to Come Back and Lowe has been involved with the band since producing their 2004 single "Moviestar".[15][16] In previous years, Lowe used an sE Electronics Gemini Valve mic to record for Stereophonics, he used it again to capture most of the vocals and some of the guitars on the album.[4] The band chose to record at ICP Studios, Brussels to fully focus on the album instead of sidetracking, which would have happened had they chose to record in London Jones believed.[8] Known for his "whiskey" vocals,[17] Jones decided to challenge and experiment his vocal limits for the album.[18] While Stereophonics in 2011, Lowe set up Stylus Studios in Shepherd's Bush, London.[4][8] "Graffiti on the Train", "Roll the Dice" and "Violins and Tambourines" originally had synthetic strings to go along with the music but the band wanted a real orchestral sound for the tracks. Stereophonics' publicist knew English composer David Arnold and so contacted him.[19] Arnold agreed to help the band and assisted Jones and Lowe for the orchestral arrangements on the three tracks.[13]

In March 2012, Wired Strings went into Stylus Studios to record the strings for "Indian Summer".[4][20] "Take Me" features vocals from Jones' partner, Jakki Healy.[21] Originally just to try out and see what female vocals would sound like accompanying Jones', Healy's recorded take remained on the track.[19] "Been Caught Cheating" was recorded in one take.[14] The drum loop featured throughout "In a Moment" was programmed by Lowe.[4] Jones and Lowe began mixing near the end of 2011 into the beginning of 2012.[4] In July that year it was announced that Stereophonics were to collaborate with Tinie Tempah and Labrinth to release two albums,[22] although neither one appeared on Graffiti on the Train.[13] The band had 40 unfinished ideas for the album;[23] nearly 30 of these were recorded and completed.[5] One of the songs that were completed and not included on the album, "Seen That Look Before", was available for an exclusive listen at Yahoo! Music's website and as a bonus track in Japan.[24][25] Two other songs from the recording sessions, "Overland" and "Zoe", were included in certain deluxe editions of the album.[13][26] The album has been noted for the band going in a different direction with their music by utilising a cinematic atmosphere.[14][21][27][28][29][30][31]

Second volume and film[edit]

Graffiti on the Train is to be the first of two volumes of albums, with the latter also containing 10 tracks. In July 2012, Jones said the release date for the second volume will be over the course of 18 months,[32] he has since tweeted on the band's page that the album has been mixed and is due for a release next year.[33] Speaking to Absolute Radio on the Christian O'Connell Breakfast Show, Jones announced they plan to release the successor album early autumn but already have new songs out in May. Some of the tracks from Graffiti on the Train's sessions will make it to the album along with completely new songs and the band are going to play some of these during summer.[34] On 11 May 2015 it was announced that the new album is called Keep the Village Alive and will be released exactly 4 months later;[35] the artwork, track listing and editions were made available the same day on the band's website while the lead single debuted on the Chris Evans Breakfast Show.[36][37][38]

Jones is writing a script, also titled Graffiti on the Train,[39] which will tie in the two volumes and has said, "in five years, it will all make sense as one big picture."[40] Director Paul Haggis, who is a fan of the band, has provided input by sending him feedback on the script. Jones has been developing the screenplay with people from BAFTA and Film Agency for Wales who are planning for the film to go into production in 2014.[39] The story is about a young couple who fall in love. The man spray paints love messages on the train for the woman to see every day as she gets the train to work. One day he spray paints "Will you marry me?" but the train crashes and he dies.[41] It will also revolve around two friends from Wales going on a "life-changing" journey after the man dies.[42] One of the characters in the film is called Stylus and Graffiti on the Train "sort of" serves as a soundtrack because they were written simultaneously.[43]

Release and promotion[edit]

Kelly Jones with gelled up hair on stage, wearing sunglasses, playing a semi-hollow Gibson electric guitar while singing.
Lead singer and album composer Kelly Jones directed all the music videos for the singles and "Violins and Tambourines".

The decision to release Graffiti on the Train on the band's own label, Stylus Records,[a] was due to their disliking of a record company's lack of commitment to the album, which led to them creating it.[19] The album was slatted for a release date sometime in October.[22] Stereophonics started promoting the album through the music video for the song "Violins and Tambourines", directed by Jones who went on to direct the videos for all the singles.[9][44][45] At this point a working name for Graffiti on the Train was Violins and Tambourines.[46] With the 30 songs Stereophonics had completed, they intended to release a trilogy of albums but later dismissed the idea after Green Day released their "¡Uno!, ¡Dos!, ¡Tré!" trilogy.[47] In December 2012, the band played 5 shows in the UK to promote the album further,[48] "Indian Summer" and "In a Moment" were played in the first half of the setlist while "Violins and Tambourines" was played as part of the encore.[49] On the last day of February 2013 the album was made available for an exclusive stream on The Daily Telegraph's website.[50]

Cover art[edit]

When being interviewed by Jacqui Swift for The Sun on 1 March 2013, Jones revealed he bought a painting two years ago by British artist Stephen Goddard. One of Jones' friends knew Goddard and so invited him along to a few Stereophonics shows. After Jones played some of the songs from the album to Goddard and shown him a script he was developing, he agreed to make the cover art.[51] This cover was featured on the deluxe CD and vinyl releases.[13][52] The bigger of the three heads on the oil painting is referred to as the "Nana head".[53] Much of the CD booklet art is based on some of his work.[54]

A month before the release date, another artwork was made for the album and was included for the single CD and digital download releases.[26][55] This one was taken by photographer Steve Gullick in London, UK sometime in mid October and includes the newly recruited Jamie Morrison on the cover.[56] Graham Rounthwaite returned for the album's art direction, he had been the art director for all of Stereophonics' album releases since Word Gets Around (1997), except for Just Enough Education to Perform, You Gotta Go There to Come Back and their previous album.[57] Pictures of the band featured in the deluxe edition's booklet were taken by photographer Hans-Peter van Velthoven.[13]

Formats[edit]

The record was released on four major formats, including: standard CD, deluxe CD, vinyl and digital download.[58] The deluxe CD features a bonus disc which contains stripped down versions of some songs present on the album, a new song called "Overland" and a remix of "In a Moment".[13] The Japanese release featured three bonus tracks, a new track titled "Seen That Look Before" and two live versions of songs from the album: "Violins and Tambourines" and "In a Moment".[25] On the iTunes deluxe edition it features three videos in the studio, a new song called "Zoe", a stripped down version of "Graffiti on the Train" and the remix of "In a Moment".[26] The latter two songs are present on both the deluxe CD and iTunes deluxe editions.

Singles[edit]

Four singles were released from the album and were all issued as 10" vinyls. "In a Moment" was released as the lead single on 4 November as a free download and again as a vinyl on 10 December 2012.[12] Due to being available to download free of charge,[12] and the vinyl limited in copies,[59] the single was not eligible to chart. "Indian Summer" was released as the second single on 18 January 2013 and is the only single out of the four to have a separate download page from the album on the iTunes Store.[60] The song peaked at number thirty on the UK Singles Chart, becoming Stereophonics' most successful single in the country since "It Means Nothing" reached number twelve in October 2007.[7] The third single was the album title track "Graffiti on the Train" released on 13 May 2013 and peaked at number forty-four in the UK.[7][61] "We Share the Same Sun" was released as the fourth and final single on 12 August 2013;[62] it failed to chart on the UK Singles Chart and peaked at number twenty-eight on the UK Independent Singles Chart. A music video was uploaded to Stereophonics' YouTube Vevo channel on 4 July.[63]

Graffiti on the Train Tour[edit]

Kelly Jones singing and playing guitar with Richard Jones on bass.
Richard Jones (right) aided Kelly Jones across an airport in order to make their flight to a show after he twisted his ankle.[64]

Stereophonics held a worldwide tour to support Graffiti on the Train titled the Graffiti on the Train Tour. It began in Leicester, England on 15 March 2013 and finished in London, England on 28 November 2013.[65][66] The tour has visited the UK, Ireland, Japan, Australia, North America, Mexico and Korea.[66][67][68][69][70] With a heavy demand for tickets at The SSE Hydro, Glasgow, a second date was added to accommodate.[71] Conversely, this became the first tour in 17 years where the band had to cancel a gig; Kelly Jones suffered from a respiratory tract infection while on the Australian leg, forcing them to cancel a show in Melbourne.[72] During their show at Manchester on 13 November, fellow Welsh musician Tom Jones made a surprise appearance.[70] In December 2013, viagogo revealed the top ten most popular touring acts – Stereophonics were placed at number ten.[73]

Reception[edit]

Critical response[edit]

Professional ratings
Aggregate scores
SourceRating
Metacritic(64/100)[74]
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic3/5 stars[75]
American Songwriter4/5 stars[76]
BBC(favourable)[1]
Daily Express4/5 stars[77]
Drowned in Sound(7/10)[29]
Mojo3/5 stars[78]
NME(4/10)[79]
Q3/5 stars[80]
Sputnikmusic3.5/5 stars[81]
The Telegraph4/5 stars[82]

Graffiti on the Train has received generally favourable reviews. At Metacritic, which assigns a weighted average rating out of 100 to reviews from mainstream critics, the album received an average score of 64 based on 16 reviews.[74] Kieran Mayall at Clash Music praised Jones' poetic lyrics and called "Violins and Tambourines" a "true lesson" in song writing.[83] Sean Adams from Drowned in Sound praised Jones' vocals as "more cat purringly perfect than ever."[29] Uncut was positive towards Jones' performance and composing, rating the album seven out of ten.[84] Blue Sullivan from Slant Magazine was less enthusiastic about his vocal performance stating they "go from mumbly, po-faced whinging to a passable Rod Stewart."[85] Matthew Horton at the BBC called the album a "solid enough start" for Stereophonics going to the next step of rock.[1]

Sputnikmusic contributor, Raul Stanciu called the album Stereophonics' best since Language. Sex. Violence. Other? (2005) and compared some of the song's sounds to those on You Gotta Go There to Come Back.[81] Moore also compared the song's sound to You Gotta Go There to Come Back by comparing them to the atmosphere of "Maybe Tomorrow".[14] Rating the album eight out of ten, PopMatters contributor, Cole Waterman also called it their best since Language. Sex. Violence. Other? but criticised some of the tracks, calling "No-one's Perfect" a "dull ballad."[30] At American Songwriter, Eric Allen praised the album as a welcome return from Keep Calm and Carry On and called it the "closest any Stereophonics album has come to perfect in nearly a decade."[76] At The Telegraph, they declared it "might be their best in a decade."[82] Adams stated the album could be the band's best record since Word Gets Around (1997).[29] Dave Simpson from The Guardian had a generally positive review, giving it three stars out of five.[31]

Stephen Thomas Erlewine at AllMusic had a generally mixed review, saying the record, "remains distinctly earthbound for all its big aspirations."[75] At No Ripcord, Carl Purvis called it a solid record but criticised the band for not stepping out of their "meat and potatoes"[b] zone.[90] In a negative review, Leonie Cooper of NME summarised the album by saying: "The deft Tom Petty chug of "Indian Summer" is anthemic enough, but there’s little else to get excited about."[79] Sullivan rated the album one and half stars out of five, criticising the tracks sounding "like they can't be bothered to get off the couch."[85]

Commercial performance[edit]

Graffiti on the Train charted at number three in the UK Album Charts on 10 March 2013,[91] becoming their third studio album to miss out on the top-spot.[7] It debuted at number two in Scotland and reached number one on the UK Indie chart.[92][93] Four days after its release, the album was given a silver certification by the BPI, it went on further to get a gold certification on 3 May 2013 and then over a year later platinum status on 2 October 2014.[94][95] The album took nearly as long as Word Gets Around to receive a platinum status, taking over a year and a half to gain the award.[94] It has, however, been in the UK charts for 34 weeks—making it the band's longest remaining studio album since Language. Sex. Violence. Other?[7] To date, the album has sold over 300,000 copies in the UK, while this outsold their previous two albums it failed to repeat the success their albums had set prior to the release of Pull the Pin.[6] At the end of 2013 it was the country's 24th biggest selling album of that year.[96]

Outside of their home territory the record has been the band's strongest chart performer since Language. Sex. Violence. Other? In Ireland the record reached number thirteen[c] on the albums chart while peaking at number three on the indie chart,[98][99] remaining in the albums chart for eleven weeks.[97] In Austria it managed to peak at number sixty-three and remained in the chart for one week, their first album to chart since 2005.[100] On the Belgian (Flanders) chart the album peaked at number forty-four for a week – it stayed on the charts for fifteen weeks, the longest a Stereophonics album has remained.[101] While on the Belgian (Wallonia) chart it was their best performer since Just Enough Education to Perform (2003) reaching number fifty-five, though it was not their longest chart run.[102]

The album has also been one of their weakest performing outside the UK. Out of the four albums that have charted in Australia, Graffiti on the Train ranks as the third top placing for peaking at number forty-two and remained in the charts for one week.[103] In France the record is their second worst chart placement at number fifty-eight, followed only by Keep Calm and Carry On and stayed in the charts for five weeks.[104]

Accolade[edit]

Graffiti on the Train was nominated for the World's Best Album at the 2014 World Music Awards.[105]

Track listing[edit]

All tracks written by Kelly Jones; "Violins and Tambourines" music co-written by Jim Lowe.

No.TitleLength
1."We Share the Same Sun"3:44
2."Graffiti on the Train"5:03
3."Indian Summer"4:27
4."Take Me"3:51
5."Catacomb"3:14
6."Roll the Dice"4:04
7."Violins and Tambourines"5:00
8."Been Caught Cheating"4:21
9."In a Moment"5:26
10."No-one's Perfect"4:00
Total length:43:04

Personnel[edit]

Bonus disc[edit]

Charts and certifications[edit]

Release history[edit]

Region Date Version Format Label
Japan[25] 27 February 2013 (2013-02-27)
  • Standard edition
  • deluxe edition
  • CD
Stylus Records[a]
Australia[116] 1 March 2013 (2013-03-01)
  • Standard edition
Ireland[117][118] 4 March 2013 (2013-03-04)
  • Standard edition
  • deluxe edition
United Kingdom[26][118]
United States[119][120] 3 September 2013 (2013-09-03)
  • Standard edition
Canada[119][121]
  • Standard edition
  • deluxe edition
MapleMusic Recordings[122]

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ a b Stylus Records is under exclusive license to Ignition Records. This is stated on the back of the Graffiti on the Train vinyl cover and its singles.[13][114] It is also listed under "associated labels" on Ignition Records' website.[115]
  2. ^ "Meat and potatoes" is a phrase used, mainly by critics, to describe Stereophonics' music since 2001.[30][31][41][86][87][88][89]
  3. ^ Language. Sex. Violence. Other? (2005) reached number one, Pull the Pin (2007) reached number fifteen and Keep Calm and Carry On (2009) reached number thirty-two.[97]
Footnotes
  1. ^ a b c Horton, Matthew (2013). "Stereophonics Graffiti on the Train Review". BBC. Archived from the original on 28 October 2013. Retrieved 14 May 2013.
  2. ^ "Graffiti on the Train Review". Ultimate Guitar Archive. Archived from the original on 6 March 2016. Retrieved 24 August 2015.
  3. ^ "Stereophonics interview with Kelly Jones: 'This album is the truest thing I've ever written'". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 24 August 2015.
  4. ^ a b c d e f "Jim Lowe on Stereophonics and the Gemini". sE Electronics. 22 May 2013. Archived from the original on 17 October 2013. Retrieved 25 July 2013.
  5. ^ a b c d McCormick, Neil (28 February 2013). "Stereophonics interview with Kelly Jones: 'This album is the truest thing I've ever written'". The Telegraph. Telegraph Media Group. Archived from the original on 17 October 2013. Retrieved 17 July 2013.
  6. ^ a b c Burrows, Marc (8 March 2013). "Album by Album: Kelly Jones on the Stereophonics' back catalogue". Drowned in Sound. Archived from the original on 28 October 2013. Retrieved 21 August 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f "STEREOPHONICS". Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on 28 October 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013.
  8. ^ a b c "Stereophonics star Kelly Jones on his band's new album plans". Wales Online. 10 December 2013. Archived from the original on 7 November 2013. Retrieved 7 November 2013.
  9. ^ a b Fulton, Rick (22 February 2013). "Stereophonics: We want to record the next James Bond theme tune". Daily Record. Archived from the original on 17 October 2013. Retrieved 28 July 2013.
  10. ^ Walsh, Ayeesha (8 October 2013). "Stereophonics debut new taster track 'film' for upcoming album". The Sun. Archived from the original on 8 October 2012. Retrieved 25 July 2013.
  11. ^ "Stereophonics' Kelly Jones discusses Amy Winehouse tribute song 'Been Caught Cheating'". NME. 9 March 2013. Archived from the original on 17 October 2013. Retrieved 3 April 2013.
  12. ^ a b c "Stereophonics give away new single 'In A Moment' as a free download – listen". NME. 4 November 2013. Archived from the original on 17 October 2013. Retrieved 12 August 2013.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Graffiti on the Train (Deluxe CD). Stereophonics. Stylus Records. 2013.CS1 maint: others (link)
  14. ^ a b c d e Moore, Clayton (22 September 2013). "Stereophonics Paint a New Picture with Graffiti on the Train". Marquee Magazine '. Archived from the original on 17 October 2013. Retrieved 12 October 2013.
  15. ^ "Kelly Jones". AllMusic. Archived from the original on 19 October 2013. Retrieved 12 October 2013.
  16. ^ Jim Lowe production credits:
    • You Gotta Go There to Come Back (CD). Stereophonics. V2 Records. 2003.CS1 maint: others (link)
    • "Jim Lowe". AllMusic. Archived from the original on 19 October 2013. Retrieved 12 October 2013.
  17. ^ "Stereophonics @ The Forum, Melbourne (04/05/08)". Faster louder. 6 May 2008. Archived from the original on 7 November 2013. Retrieved 7 November 2013.
  18. ^ Rowley, Eddie (17 March 2013). "'Being a dad is a fantastic contrast to travelling around with a bunch of idiots who are always mental'". Sunday World. Archived from the original on 7 November 2013. Retrieved 7 November 2013.
  19. ^ a b c Macgregor, Jody (1 July 2013). "Stereophonics: Why we ditched our label and went DIY". Faster louder. Archived from the original on 8 November 2013. Retrieved 7 November 2013.
  20. ^ "In the studio with Stereophonics". Wired Strings. 14 March 2012. Archived from the original on 19 October 2013. Retrieved 15 July 2013.
  21. ^ a b Jenkins, Mark (19 September 2013). "Stereophonics album review: 'Graffiti on the Train'". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on 19 October 2013. Retrieved 12 October 2013.
  22. ^ a b "Stereophonics to collaborate with Tinie Tempah and Labrinth". NME. 3 July 2012. Archived from the original on 19 October 2013. Retrieved 15 July 2013.
  23. ^ "Graffiti on the Train". Piccadilly Records. Archived from the original on 19 October 2013. Retrieved 17 July 2013.
  24. ^ Geller, Wendy (20 September 2013). "Exclusive! Hear Unreleased Track From Stereophonics". Yahoo! Music. Yahoo!. Archived from the original on 3 November 2013. Retrieved 3 November 2013.
  25. ^ a b c d "Graffiti On The Train - Stereophonics". Cdjapan. Neowing. 2013. Archived from the original on 16 July 2014. Retrieved 16 July 2014.
  26. ^ a b c d e "Graffiti on the Train (Deluxe Version) – Stereophonics". iTunes Store. Apple Inc. 4 March 2013. Archived from the original on 20 October 2013. Retrieved 1 August 2013.
  27. ^ Carroll, Grace (3 July 2012). "Stereophonics' planning double album release". Gigwise. Archived from the original on 4 November 2013. Retrieved 4 November 2013.
  28. ^ Pannacione, Maggie (5 June 2013). "Stereophonics to Release "Graffiti on the Train" on August 20". Artistdirect. Archived from the original on 19 October 2013. Retrieved 12 October 2013.
  29. ^ a b c d Adams, Sean (8 March 2013). "Stereophonics Graffiti on the Train". Drowned in Sound. Archived from the original on 19 October 2013. Retrieved 8 March 2013.
  30. ^ a b c Waterman, Cole (12 March 2013). "Stereophonics: Graffiti on the Train". PopMatters. Archived from the original on 19 October 2013. Retrieved 11 October 2013.
  31. ^ a b c Simpson, Dave (28 February 2013). "Stereophonics: Graffiti on the Train – review". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 19 October 2013. Retrieved 11 October 2013.
  32. ^ Showbiz, Bang (7 July 2012). "Stereophonics – Stereophonics' Two-part Album". Contactmusic.com. Archived from the original on 19 October 2013. Retrieved 25 July 2013.
  33. ^ Derbyshire, James (29 September 2014). "Stereophonics Tease 2015 Album". Fortitude Magazine. Archived from the original on 11 February 2015. Retrieved 11 February 2015.
  34. ^ "Stereophonics want 'hot girls' on rider". BANG Showbiz. The List. 27 January 2015. Archived from the original on 20 February 2015. Retrieved 20 February 2015.
  35. ^ "Stereophonics announce new album Keep the Village Alive". XFM. 11 May 2015. Retrieved 11 May 2015.
  36. ^ "Stereophonics Shop". The Stereophonics Ltd. 11 May 2015. Retrieved 11 May 2015.
  37. ^ Williams, Kathryn (11 May 2015). "Listen to Stereophonics' new song C'est La Vie". Wales Online. Archived from the original on 14 May 2015. Retrieved 11 May 2015.
  38. ^ BBC Radio 2 (11 May 2015). "The Chris Evans Breakfast Show - 11/05/2015". BBC. Retrieved 11 May 2013.
  39. ^ a b "Welsh wonders". The Irish News. 1 November 2013. Archived from the original on 3 November 2013. Retrieved 3 November 2013.
  40. ^ Showbiz, Bang (1 March 2013). "Stereophonics – Stereophonics taking visual risk with new album". Contactmusic.com. Archived from the original on 19 October 2013. Retrieved 25 July 2013.
  41. ^ a b "Stereophonics - They've been at this for 15 years". BeatRoute. 5 October 2013. Archived from the original on 8 November 2013. Retrieved 8 November 2013.
  42. ^ "Still living the dream". RedHanded. 2014. Archived from the original on 16 July 2014. Retrieved 16 July 2014.
  43. ^ Nevada, Ria (7 October 2013). "Stereophonics' Kelly Jones (interview)". The Snipe. Archived from the original on 3 November 2013. Retrieved 3 November 2013.
  44. ^ "Graffiti on the Train video". The Stereophonics Ltd. 22 April 2013. Archived from the original on 20 October 2013. Retrieved 15 August 2013.
  45. ^ "Stereophonics 'We Share The Same Sun'". Vimeo. 1 July 2013. Archived from the original on 20 October 2013. Retrieved 15 August 2013.
  46. ^ "Stereophonics debut new song "Violins and Tambourines"". NME. 8 October 2012. Archived from the original on 20 October 2013. Retrieved 15 July 2013.
  47. ^ "Stereophonics – Stereophonics Dismissed Album Trilogy After Green Day Project". WENN. Contactmusic.com. 11 March 2013. Archived from the original on 20 October 2013. Retrieved 21 August 2013.
  48. ^ "Stereophonics announce December 2012 mini-tour". NME. 30 October 2012. Archived from the original on 28 September 2014. Retrieved 28 October 2014.
  49. ^ "2012 Christmas Tour". Setlist.fm. December 2012. Archived from the original on 20 October 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013.
  50. ^ "Stereophonics: Graffiti on the Train - exclusive album stream". The Daily Telegraph. Telegraph Media Group. 28 February 2013. Archived from the original on 28 September 2014. Retrieved 28 September 2014.
  51. ^ Swift, Jacqui (1 March 2013). "The Sun – Something for the weekend (FEATURE)". The Sun. The Stereophonics Ltd. Archived from the original on 20 October 2013. Retrieved 17 August 2013.
  52. ^ Graffiti on the Train (Vinyl). Stereophonics. Stylus Records. 2013.CS1 maint: others (link)
  53. ^ "Nana Head March 2013 Tour Poster". The Stereophonics Ltd. March 2013. Archived from the original on 20 October 2013. Retrieved 17 October 2013.
  54. ^ "Steve Goddard". artnet. Archived from the original on 20 October 2013. Retrieved 15 July 2013.
  55. ^ "Extra Artwork For Graffiti on the Train". The Stereophonics Ltd. 1 February 2013. Archived from the original on 20 October 2013. Retrieved 17 October 2013.
  56. ^ "Steve Gullick working with Stereophonics". Probation. 16 October 2013. Archived from the original on 20 April 2014. Retrieved 20 April 2014.
  57. ^ "Graham Rounthwaite". AllMusic. Archived from the original on 20 October 2013. Retrieved 15 July 2013.
  58. ^ "Graffiti on the Train". The Stereophonics Ltd. 4 March 2013. Archived from the original on 20 October 2013. Retrieved 28 July 2013.
  59. ^ "In A Moment [10" VINYL] [Maxi]". Amazon.com. 10 December 2012. Retrieved 10 August 2014.
  60. ^ "Indian Summer – Single". iTunes Store. Apple Inc. 18 January 2013. Archived from the original on 20 October 2013. Retrieved 15 August 2013.
  61. ^ "New single – 'Graffiti on the Train' Limited edition 10" vinyl". The Stereophonics Ltd. 12 April 2013. Archived from the original on 20 October 2013. Retrieved 27 July 2013.
  62. ^ Howells, Andy (28 June 2013). "Stereophonics to release new single We Share The Same Sun". South Wales Argus. Archived from the original on 20 October 2013. Retrieved 15 July 2013.
  63. ^ "We Share The Same Sun video". The Stereophonics Ltd. 4 July 2013. Archived from the original on 20 October 2013. Retrieved 11 July 2013.
  64. ^ Bevan, Nathan (25 August 2013). "Stereophonics' Kelly Jones on drinking in Japan and having hair like One Direction". Wales Online. Trinity Mirror. Archived from the original on 1 November 2013. Retrieved 1 November 2013.
  65. ^ "Stereophonics announce 10-date March tour". NME. 21 January 2013. Archived from the original on 28 September 2014. Retrieved 28 September 2014.
  66. ^ a b "Stereophonics - Upcoming concerts". Songkick. 2013. Archived from the original on 1 November 2013. Retrieved 1 November 2013.
  67. ^ "Japan Tour dates!". The Stereophonics Ltd. 28 April 2013. Archived from the original on 1 November 2013. Retrieved 7 November 2013.
  68. ^ Mann, Tom (1 July 2013). "Stereophonics change tour plans". Faster louder. Archived from the original on 4 November 2013. Retrieved 7 November 2013.
  69. ^ "STEREOPHONICS Announce U.S. Tour Dates Supporting New Album 'Graffiti on the Train'". PureGrainAudio.com. 30 May 2013. Archived from the original on 4 November 2013. Retrieved 7 November 2013.
  70. ^ a b "9 STUNNING PHOTOS OF STEREOPHONICS ON UK TOUR AT LEEDS ARENA". Gigwise. 18 November 2013. Archived from the original on 22 July 2014. Retrieved 22 July 2014.
  71. ^ "Stereophonics to play extra night at The Hydro due to popular demand". STV News. STV. 3 April 2013. Archived from the original on 22 July 2014. Retrieved 22 July 2014.
  72. ^ Trendell, Andrew (24 July 2013). "Stereophonics cancel Australia gig as Kelly Jones suffers respiratory illness". Gigwise. Archived from the original on 4 November 2013. Retrieved 4 November 2013.
  73. ^ "Top ten most in demand concert tickets of 2013: One Direction, The Rolling Stones and Bastille". viagogo. Yahoo!. 12 December 2013. Archived from the original on 12 August 2014. Retrieved 22 July 2014.
  74. ^ a b "Graffiti on the Train". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on 28 October 2013. Retrieved 1 October 2013.
  75. ^ a b Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "Graffiti on the Train – Stereophonics". AllMusic. Retrieved 10 March 2013.
  76. ^ a b Allen, Eric (3 March 2013). "Stereophonics: Graffiti on the Train". American Songwriter. Archived from the original on 28 October 2013. Retrieved 3 March 2013.
  77. ^ Unwin, Stephen (1 March 2013). "Stereophonics: Graffiti on the Train". Daily Express. Northern & Shell. Archived from the original on 28 October 2013. Retrieved 17 July 2013.
  78. ^ "Stereophonics: Graffiti on the Train". Mojo. 7 March 2013. p. 96.
  79. ^ a b Cooper, Leonie (27 February 2013). "Stereophonics – 'Graffiti on the Train'". NME. Archived from the original on 28 October 2013. Retrieved 27 February 2013.
  80. ^ "Stereophonics: Graffiti on the Train". Q. April 2013. p. 110.
  81. ^ a b Stanciu, Raul. "Stereophonics Graffiti on the Train Review". Sputnikmusic. Archived from the original on 28 October 2013. Retrieved 15 July 2013.
  82. ^ a b "Stereophonics Graffiti on the Train". The Telegraph. The Stereophonics Ltd. Archived from the original on 28 October 2013. Retrieved 17 July 2013.
  83. ^ Mayall, Kieran (4 March 2013). "Stereophonics – Graffiti on the Train". ClashMusic.com. Clash. Retrieved 11 October 2013.
  84. ^ "Stereophonics: Graffiti on the Train". Uncut. April 2013. p. 78.
  85. ^ a b Sullivan, Blue (29 August 2013). "Stereophonics – Graffiti on the Train". Slant Magazine. Archived from the original on 28 October 2013. Retrieved 11 October 2013.
  86. ^ Moody, Paul (21 March 2001). "Stereophonics: Shepherds Bush Empire". NME. Archived from the original on 8 November 2013. Retrieved 8 November 2013. Note: So far found, this is the earliest use of the phrase directed toward Stereophonics.
  87. ^ Smith, Jack (2003). "Stereophonics You Gotta Go There To Come Back Review". BBC Wales Music. BBC. Archived from the original on 8 November 2013. Retrieved 8 November 2013.
  88. ^ "Stereophonics' double date at SSE Hydro". Evening Times. 6 November 2013. Archived from the original on 8 November 2013. Retrieved 8 November 2013.
  89. ^ Simpson, Dave (13 November 2009). "Stereophonics: Keep Calm and Carry On". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 8 November 2013. Retrieved 8 November 2013.
  90. ^ Purvis, Carl (10 March 2013). "Stereophonics: Graffiti On The Train". No Ripcord. Archived from the original on 28 October 2013. Retrieved 11 October 2013.
  91. ^ a b "2013 Top 40 Official UK Albums Archive - 16th March 2013". Official Charts Company. 9 March 2013. Archived from the original on 28 October 2013. Retrieved 27 July 2013.
  92. ^ a b "2013 Top 40 Scottish Albums Archive". Official Charts Company. 16 March 2013. Archived from the original on 28 October 2013. Retrieved 27 July 2013.
  93. ^ a b "2013 Top 40 Independent Albums Archive - 16th March 2013". Official Charts Company. 9 March 2013. Archived from the original on 28 October 2013. Retrieved 28 October 2013.
  94. ^ a b "Certified Awards". British Phonographic Industry. 3 May 2013. Retrieved 29 June 2013. Note: Graffiti on the Train has to be searched manually.
  95. ^ a b "Graffiti on the Train has gone Platinum!!". Stereophonics. Facebook. 2 October 2014. Retrieved 2 October 2014. Note: When BPI release this on their website this source should be taken out or replaced with the BPI source.
  96. ^ a b "The Official Top 40 Biggest Selling Artist Albums Of 2013". Official Charts Company. 1 January 2014. Archived from the original on 20 April 2014. Retrieved 20 April 2014.
  97. ^ a b "Discography Stereophonics". Irishcharts.com. 2013. Archived from the original on 29 May 2014. Retrieved 29 May 2014.
  98. ^ a b "Top 100 Artist Album, week ending 7 March 2013". GfK. 7 March 2013. Archived from the original on 31 October 2013. Retrieved 27 July 2013.
  99. ^ a b "Top 10 Independent Artist Albums, week ending 7 March 2013". GfK. 7 March 2013. Archived from the original on 28 October 2013. Retrieved 27 July 2013.
  100. ^ a b "Stereophonics – Graffiti on the Train (album)" (in German). Austriancharts.at. 15 March 2013. Archived from the original on 31 October 2013. Retrieved 27 July 2013.
  101. ^ a b "Stereophonics – Graffiti on the Train" (in Dutch). Ultratop. Archived from the original on 31 October 2013. Retrieved 27 July 2013.
  102. ^ a b "Stereophonics – Graffiti on the Train" (in French). Ultratop. Archived from the original on 31 October 2013. Retrieved 27 July 2013.
  103. ^ a b "Australian Album Chart". ARIA Charts. ARIA. 11 March 2013. Retrieved 27 July 2013.
  104. ^ a b "Stereophonics – Graffiti on the Train (album)" (in French). Leschart.com. 16 March 2013. Archived from the original on 31 October 2013. Retrieved 7 August 2013.
  105. ^ "Nomination for worlds best album". World Music Awards. 2014. Archived from the original on 30 September 2014. Retrieved 30 September 2014.
  106. ^ "Stereophonics – Graffiti on the Train (album)". MegaCharts (in Dutch). GfK. 9 March 2013. Archived from the original on 31 October 2013. Retrieved 27 July 2013.
  107. ^ "Italy Albums Top 100" (PDF). αCharts. 12 March 2013. Archived from the original (PDF) on 31 October 2013. Retrieved 27 July 2013.
  108. ^ "Stereophonics – Graffiti on the Train (album)". Productores de Música de España. Spanishcharts.com. 10 March 2013. Archived from the original on 31 October 2013. Retrieved 27 July 2013.
  109. ^ "2013 Top 40 UK Album Downloads Archive - 16th March 2013". Official Charts Company. 9 March 2013. Archived from the original on 28 October 2013. Retrieved 27 July 2013.
  110. ^ "Stereophonics - Indian Summer". Ultratop. 9 February 2013. Archived from the original on 31 October 2013. Retrieved 29 June 2013.
  111. ^ "Irish music charts archive - Top 100 Singles, week ending 14 March 2013". GFK Chart-Track. 14 March 2013. Archived from the original on 31 October 2013. Retrieved 29 June 2013.
  112. ^ "Graffiti on the Train credits". AllMusic. Archived from the original on 3 November 2013. Retrieved 17 July 2013.
  113. ^ "2013 Top 40 Independent Singles Archive". Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on 31 October 2013. Retrieved 14 August 2013. Note: "Indian Summer", "Graffiti on the Train" and "We Share the Same Sun" peak position dates are 16 February – 23 March, 1 June and 31 August, respectively.
  114. ^ Singles references:
  115. ^ "Records". Ignition Records. Ignition Management. Archived from the original on 19 October 2013. Retrieved 20 October 2013.
  116. ^ "Graffiti on a Train". Sanity. 1 March 2013. Archived from the original on 20 October 2013. Retrieved 15 October 2013.
  117. ^ "Graffiti on the Train (Deluxe Version) – Stereophonics". iTunes Store. Apple Inc. 4 March 2013. Archived from the original on 20 October 2013. Retrieved 15 October 2013.
  118. ^ a b Release formats in UK and Ireland. Note: Amazon.co.uk serves as Ireland's Amazon website.
  119. ^ a b "Album now available in the USA & Canada!". The Stereophonics Ltd. 3 September 2013. Archived from the original on 20 October 2013. Retrieved 12 October 2013.
  120. ^ "Graffiti on the Train [CD]". Amazon.com. 3 September 2013. Archived from the original on 20 October 2013. Retrieved 15 October 2013.
  121. ^ Canada release formats and versions:
  122. ^ "Graffiti On The Train". MapleMusic Recordings. 3 September 2013. Archived from the original on 6 November 2013. Retrieved 6 November 2013.
Bibliography
  • Danny O'Connor (2001). Stereophonics – Just Enough Evidence to Print. London: Virgin Publishing Ltd. ISBN 0-7535-0527-4.

External links[edit]