Graham Potter

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Graham Potter
Personal information
Full name Graham Stephen Potter[1]
Date of birth (1975-05-20) 20 May 1975 (age 42)[1]
Place of birth Solihull, England
Height 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)[2]
Playing position Full back
Club information
Current team
Östersunds FK (manager)
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1992–1993 Birmingham City 25 (2)
1993 Wycombe Wanderers (loan) 3 (0)
1993–1996 Stoke City 45 (1)
1996–1997 Southampton 8 (0)
1997–2000 West Bromwich Albion 43 (0)
1997 Northampton Town (loan) 3 (0)
1997–1998 Northampton Town (loan) 1 (0)
1999 Reading (loan) 4 (0)
2000–2003 York City 114 (5)
2003–2004 Boston United 12 (0)
2003 Shrewsbury Town (loan) 5 (0)
2004–2005 Macclesfield Town 57 (8)
Total 320 (16)
National team
1996 England U21 1 (0)
Teams managed
2011– Östersunds FK
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

Graham Stephen Potter (born 20 May 1975) is an English former footballer who is head coach of Swedish Allsvenskan club Östersunds FK. In a 13-year playing career, he made 307 appearances in the Football League, mainly as a full back, and also played in the Premier League for Southampton. At international level, he was capped once for England at under-21 level. He took over as Östersunds FK ahead of the 2011 season.

Playing career[edit]

Born in Solihull, Potter began his career as a trainee at Birmingham City. After a loan spell at Wycombe Wanderers, he moved on to Stoke City, then to Southampton,[2] where he played in the 6–3 win over Manchester United in 1996.[3] While a Southampton player, he was capped for England U21s in a European Championships qualifier against Moldova.[4]

He joined West Bromwich Albion in 1997, and after three-and-a-half years, which included loan spells at Northampton Town and Reading, he signed for York City.[2]

Potter moved from York City to Boston United in the summer of 2003.[5] He joined Shrewsbury Town on loan in November 2003.[6] In 2004, he moved on a free transfer to Macclesfield Town, where he finished his senior playing career.[2]

Coaching career[edit]

With support from the Professional Footballers' Association, Potter graduated from the Open University in December 2005 with a degree in Social Sciences.[7] He worked as a football development manager for the University of Hull and as assistant coach for the England Universities Squad,[8] before joining Leeds Metropolitan University in a similar role; while at Leeds, he completed a master's in leadership and emotional intelligence.[9]

In December 2010, Potter signed a three-year contract as coach of Östersunds FK, who were then playing in the fourth tier of Swedish football.[10] In 2013, after two successive promotions, he prolonged his contract with the club for another three years.[11] On 27 October 2015, Östersunds FK secured promotion to the Swedish top flight, Allsvenskan, for the first time in their history.[12]

Career statistics[edit]

  • Sourced from Graham Potter profile at the English National Football Archive (subscription required)
Club Season League FA Cup League Cup Other[A] Total
Division Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Birmingham City 1992–93 First Division 18 2 1 0 0 0 4 0 23 2
1993–94 First Division 7 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 9 0
Wycombe Wanderers (loan) 1993–94 Third Division 3 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 5 0
Stoke City 1993–94 First Division 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 5 0
1994–95 First Division 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
1995–96 First Division 41 1 2 0 3 0 5 0 51 1
Southampton 1996–97 Premier League 8 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 10 0
West Bromwich Albion 1996–97 First Division 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0
1997–98 First Division 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0
1998–99 First Division 22 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 24 0
1999–2000 First Division 10 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 12 0
Northampton Town (loan) 1997–98 Second Division 4 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 5 0
Reading (loan) 1999–2000 Second Division 4 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 5 0
York City 2000–01 Third Division 38 2 4 1 2 0 0 0 44 3
2001–02 Third Division 37 2 6 2 1 0 0 0 44 4
2002–03 Third Division 39 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 43 1
Boston United 2003–04 Third Division 12 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 15 0
Macclesfield Town 2003–04 Third Division 16 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 16 2
2004–05 League Two 41 6 3 0 1 0 3 0 48 6
Career total 315 16 22 3 16 0 19 0 372 19
A. ^ The "Other" column constitutes appearances and goals in the Anglo-Italian Cup, Football League Trophy.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Graham Potter". Barry Hugman's Footballers. Retrieved 9 December 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Graham Potter". Soccerbase. Centurycomm. Retrieved 9 December 2016. 
  3. ^ "So'ton 6–3 Man Utd". Sky Sports. 26 October 1996. Retrieved 9 December 2016. 
    Ogden, Mark (18 October 2013). "Flashback: Southampton 6 Manchester United 3 – Egil Ostenstad scores hat-trick as United humbled at The Dell". Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 9 December 2016. 
  4. ^ "The under-21s 1990–2000". England Football Online. Retrieved 9 December 2016. 
  5. ^ "Boston sign Potter". BBC Sport. 8 July 2003. Retrieved 7 June 2007. 
  6. ^ "Shrews sign Potter on loan". BBC Sport. 22 November 2003. Retrieved 7 June 2007. 
  7. ^ Clarkson, Ian (18 January 2006). "Careers after football: Graham Potter used 'the old grey matter' to get his degree – thanks to the PFA!". Professional Footballers' Association. Archived from the original on 13 June 2011. Retrieved 22 September 2009. 
  8. ^ "Hull football star scores national coaching role". University of Hull. 14 April 2008. Archived from the original on 21 April 2008. Retrieved 16 April 2008. 
  9. ^ Taylor, Louise (2 April 2016). "From Solihull to sold-out stadiums and success in Sweden's Winter City". The Observer. Retrieved 9 December 2016. 
  10. ^ "En fantastisk Julklapp till ÖFK" [A fantastic Christmas present for ÖFK] (in Swedish). Östersunds FK. 23 December 2010. Retrieved 9 December 2016. 
  11. ^ "Graham Potter stannar i ÖFK" [Graham Potter is staying at ÖFK!]. SvenskaFans.com (in Swedish). 6 November 2013. Retrieved 19 October 2014. 
  12. ^ Käck, Andreas; Bohman, Per (27 October 2015). "Östersund klart för spel i allsvenskan" [Östersund will be playing in the Allsvenskan]. Aftonbladet (in Swedish). Retrieved 13 January 2016. 

External links[edit]