Graham Price

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Graham Price
Full name Graham Price
Date of birth (1951-11-24)24 November 1951
Place of birth Moascar, Egypt
School West Monmouth Grammar School
Crewe and Alsager College
Nash College, Newport
University University of Wales Institute of Science and Technology
Rugby union career
Position(s) Prop
Amateur team(s)
Years Team Apps (Points)
National team(s)
Years Team Apps (Points)
1975–1983
1977–1983
Wales
British Lions
41
12
(8)
(4)

Graham Price MBE (born 24 November 1951 in Moascar, Egypt) is a former Welsh rugby union player, who was a member of the famous Pontypool RFC front row known as the "Viet Gwent". He won 41 caps for Wales, and a record 12 for the British and Irish Lions as a prop forward.

Early life[edit]

Graham Price was born in Moascar, Egypt, on 24 November 1951.[1] He was brought up in Pontypool,[2] where he was educated at West Monmouth School. He studied civil engineering at UWIST, part of the University of Wales in Cardiff.[3]

Rugby career[edit]

Pontypool[edit]

He joined Pontypool after leaving school, and played at tight-head prop. With Bobby Windsor and Charlie Faulkner he became part of the legendary front row, also known as the "Viet Gwent" (a play on Viet Cong) and immortalised in song by Max Boyce.[4][5]

Wales caps[edit]

He made his debut for Wales national rugby union team in the 1975 Five Nations Championship against France at the Parc des Princes in Paris. The game featured six players earning their first cap, and the entire Pontypool front line.[6] When the ball was hacked forward some 3 metres (9.8 ft) from the French line following a Welsh counter attack, Price caught the ball as it bounced and ran it in for a try. Wales won by 25-10,[7] their biggest victory over the French since 1909,[4] and the try was subsequently voted the fourth best try ever by a Welsh player.[7] Grand Slams followed for the Wales team in 1976 and 1978.[8]

British Lion[edit]

Price played as a prop in a record 12 successive tests for the British and Irish Lions, touring New Zealand in 1977. The front line in that tour was dominated by the "Viet Gwent" players, including Price.[9] During a test match against Australia, he suffered a broken jaw after a punch by Steve Finanne. Price had to eat liquidized food for six weeks, and wore dentures for the following 40 years until replaced by implants in 2015.[8] He returned for the South Africa in 1980 and made his final international appearances in the New Zealand in 1983 at the age of 31.[9] He had played in every match of all three tours.[4] His record of 12 appearances for a prop for the British and Irish Lions is not expected to be broken.[9]

Outside rugby[edit]

In 2012 Price made a cameo appearance as himself in an episode of the UK comedy drama Stella.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Graham Price". ESPN. Retrieved 1 May 2016. 
  2. ^ Wellings, Lee (31 January 2014). "Battle to keep Welsh rugby clubs alive". Al Jazeera Europe. Retrieved 1 May 2016. 
  3. ^ Parfitt, Delme (16 June 2007). "Graham Price was born in Moascar, Egypt, on November 24, 1951". Wales Online. Retrieved 1 May 2016. 
  4. ^ a b c Richards, Huw (23 January 2015). "The day the Viet Gwent were unleashed on France". ESPN. Retrieved 1 May 2016. 
  5. ^ Gallagher, Brendon (1 November 2005). "Feared Viet Gwent reform for a night to remember". Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 1 May 2016. 
  6. ^ Parfitt, Delme (21 March 2014). "Graham Price and Shane Williams recall their big Wales breaks via Probables versus Possibles matches". Wales Online. Retrieved 1 May 2016. 
  7. ^ a b "Prop Idols: Megan York meets Graham Price". Welsh Rugby Union. 8 March 2016. Retrieved 1 May 2016. 
  8. ^ a b Skellon, Katharine (23 December 2015). "Ex-Wales and Pontypool rugby legend Graham Price gets new front teeth in time for Christmas". South Wales Argus. Retrieved 1 May 2016. 
  9. ^ a b c "Graham Price". British and Irish Lions. Retrieved 1 May 2016. 
  10. ^ "James Corden spotted filming new comedy in Wales with Ruth Jones". 21 March 2013. Retrieved 1 May 2016. 

Further reading[edit]