Grammistes sexlineatus

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Grammistes sexlineatus
NunoS.jpg
Conservation status
Not evaluated (IUCN 3.1)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Perciformes
Family: Serranidae
Subfamily: Grammistinae
Genus: Grammistes
Species: G. sexlineatus
Binomial name
Grammistes sexlineatus
Thunberg, 1792

Grammistes sexlineatus is a species of fish in the family Serranidae. Its common names include goldenstriped soapfish,[1] six-lined soapfish, and skunkfish.[2]

Description[edit]

Grammistes sexlineatus is a middle sized fish, it can grow up to 30 cms of maximum length.[3] Its vernacular name comes from its particular body shape which reminds a soap. Its background body color is dark brown with a maximum of six white to yellow horizontal lines but number of lines depends on the maturity of the fish. Thus, the juveniles have white to yellow dots on a dark background until an approximate size of 17.5 mm.[4] Thereafter , the points gradually become lines. To a length of 5cms, these soap fish have three horizontal lines. Only from 8cms long that the soapfish gets the six distinctive horizontal lines. Note that adults specimen close to the maximum size, these lines tend to sever to form small strokes and points.[5]

Distribution & habitat[edit]

The six lined soapfish is widespread throughout the tropical and subtropical waters of the Indo-Pacific area from the eastern coast of Africa to the oceanic islands of the Pacific Ocean, including Hawaii and the Red Sea. And from south Japan to north New-Zealand.[6][7]

This soapfish occurs in coastal rocky and coral reefs from shallow to 40-50 meters depth.[8]

Biology[edit]

Individuals are generally solitary in their reef habitat.[9] They usually stay hidden in crevices, and are most active at night.[2]

Like other fish in the subfamily Grammistinae, this species produces a toxin from the skin.[2] The toxins in the skin secretions are known as grammistins.[10] This is not caught as a food fish because the flesh reportedly has a bitter, unpleasant taste.[9]

Habitat[edit]

Salt water

Utilization[edit]

Fishery: Small ; Aquarium: Trade

References[edit]

  1. ^ Froese, R. and D. Pauly, eds. Grammistes sexlineatus. FishBase. 2014.
  2. ^ a b c Amesbury, S. S. and R. F. Myers. Grammistinae (Soapfishes). The Fishes. Guide to the Coastal Resources of Guam, Vol 1.
  3. ^ Lieske, E. and R. Myers, 1994. Collins Pocket Guide. Coral reef fishes. Indo-Pacific & Caribbean including the Red Sea. Haper Collins Publishers, 400 p.
  4. ^ Coloration and Probable Toxicity of Juvenile Soapfish Grammistes sexlineatus (Pisces: Grammistidae) Ariel Diamant & Daniel Golani Copeia Vol. 1984, No. 4 (Dec. 18, 1984), pp. 1015-1017
  5. ^ Randall, J.E., 1986. Grammistidae. p. 537-538. In M.M. Smith and P.C. Heemstra (eds.) Smiths' sea fishes. Springer-Verlag, Berlin.
  6. ^ Paulin, C., A. Stewart, C. Roberts and P. McMillan, 1989. New Zealand fish: a complete guide. National Museum of New Zealand Miscellaneous Series No. 19. 279 p.
  7. ^ Coloration and Probable Toxicity of Juvenile Soapfish Grammistes sexlineatus (Pisces: Grammistidae) Ariel Diamant & Daniel Golani Copeia Vol. 1984, No. 4 (Dec. 18, 1984), pp. 1015-1017
  8. ^ Coloration and Probable Toxicity of Juvenile Soapfish Grammistes sexlineatus (Pisces: Grammistidae) Ariel Diamant and Daniel Golani Copeia Vol. 1984, No. 4 (Dec. 18, 1984), pp. 1015-1017
  9. ^ a b Diamant, A. and D. Golani. (1984). Coloration and probable toxicity of juvenile soapfish Grammistes sexlineatus (Pisces: Grammistidae). Copeia 1984(4) 1015-17.
  10. ^ Sugiyama, N., et al. (2005). Further isolation and characterization of grammistins from the skin secretion of the soapfish Grammistes sexlineatus. Toxicon 45(5) 595-601.

External Link[edit]

Biodiversity-Base Economy Development :BEDO (Thailand)