Grand River Academy

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Grand River Academy
Grand River Academy (logo).jpg
Address
3042 College Street
Austinburg, Ohio, (Ashtabula County) 44010
United States
Coordinates 41°46′22″N 80°51′43″W / 41.77278°N 80.86194°W / 41.77278; -80.86194Coordinates: 41°46′22″N 80°51′43″W / 41.77278°N 80.86194°W / 41.77278; -80.86194
Information
Type Private, Boarding, All-Male
Motto "Grand River Academy is a college preparatory boarding and day school that helps young men activate their academic, emotional, and social potential and prepares them for lifelong success."
Religious affiliation(s) Nonsectarian
Established 1831
Administrator 9
Headmaster Tim Viands
Staff 16
Faculty 22
Grades 812, Post Graduate
Enrollment 105 (2015 - 2016)
Average class size 6
Student to teacher ratio 7:1
Campus Rural
Campus size over 150 acres (0.61 km2)
Color(s) Blue and White         
Slogan "Don't Give Up, Don't Ever Give Up"
Athletics conference Lake Erie Conference
Sports Soccer, Golf, Cross Country, Basketball, Wrestling, Bowling, Baseball, Lacrosse, Tennis
Mascot Eagle
Team name Eagles
Accreditation ISACS, ODE, NAIS, TABS
Tuition $44,460 (tuition/boarding; 2015-16)
Dean of Students & Faculty Bill Thomas
Admissions Director Peter Wickman
Athletic Director Frank Shreve
Website

Grand River Academy, formerly known as the Ashtabula County Institute of Science and Industry and then the Grand River Institute, is a private, nonsectarian, boarding high school for young men located in Austinburg, Ohio. It serves approximately 110 students in grades eight through twelve, with a post-graduate option. Grand River Academy is a college preparatory boarding and day school that helps young men activate their academic, emotional and social potential and prepares them for lifelong success.

History[edit]

The Grand River Institute, originally named the Ashtabula County Institute of Science and Industry, was founded in 1831 by a group of prominent leaders from the Austinburg Congregational Church. The school was originally intended to prepare young men for ministerial vocations, but in 1840, it began to admit female students. Betsy Mix Cowles was appointed as the school's first female principal in charge of the Women's Department, a post she held from 1843-1848. The institution's name and location changed in 1836 at the behest of Joab Austin, a wealthy citizen who pledged a sizeable endowment for the school.

Facilities[edit]

In addition to classroom and sports facilities, the school has a gymnasium and the Robert Morrison Lecture Center and Bud Field Student Center. Students are accommodated in one of five dormitories: Shepard Hall, Mastin Hall, West Hall, North Hall and Warren Hall.

Academics[edit]

The school admits boys who for a variety of reasons may not be reaching their full potential in a traditional high school environment. It teaches in small classes, and boasts many unique programs, such as the Foundations Learning Program[1] where students learn how they best learn and manage time to succeed in the classroom, and newly introduced The Productive Growth Center.[2]

In order to graduate, students must obtain 21 units of credit. In addition, all seniors must be accepted by an accredited college prior to graduation.[3] Students have been accepted at 75 different colleges.[4]

Grand River is accredited by the Ohio Department of Education, North Central Association Commission on Accreditation and the Independent Schools Association of the Central States.

Athletics[edit]

As a member of the Lake Effect Conference, GRA offers a full range of athletic programs, consisting of 9 varsity, 4 junior varsity, and 1 club team.

Fall Sports[edit]

Winter Sports[edit]

Spring Sports[edit]

Notable alumni[edit]

Politics, government and law[edit]

Business[edit]

Notable faculty[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://grandriver.org/academics/the-learning-center
  2. ^ http://grandriver.org/academics/productive-growth-center
  3. ^ "Grand River Academy Graduation Requirements", Grand River Academy, accessed 10 May 2008
  4. ^ "The Grand River Academy College Acceptances", Grand River Academy, accessed 10 May 2008
  5. ^ Whitney, Orson F. (1904). History of Utah: Comprising Preliminary Chapters on the Previous History of ... G. Q. Cannon. p. 687. OCLC 4995807. 
  6. ^ United States Congress. "Julius C. Burrows (id: B001142)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. . Retrieved on 2008-05-02.
  7. ^ United States Congress. "Theodore E. Burton (id: B001159)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. . Retrieved on 2008-05-02.
  8. ^ United States Congress. "Ralph Hill (id: H000604)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. . Retrieved on 2008-05-10.
  9. ^ Smith, Joseph P. (1898). History of the Republican Party in Ohio. Lewis Publishing. p. 581. OCLC 12634256. 
  10. ^ Geary, Linda L. (1989). Balanced in the Wind: A Biography of Betsey Mix Cowles. Bucknell University Press. pp. 46–47. ISBN 0-8387-5154-7. 

External links[edit]