Gravity science (Juno)

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The gravity science experiment for Juno involves using communication hardware on Juno and Earth. Deep Space Network antenna shown here.

The Gravity Science experiment and instrument set aboard the Juno Jupiter orbiter is designed to monitor Jupiter's gravity.[1][2][3] Juno's gravity science experiment is intended to mapping Jupiter's gravitational field, which allows the interior of Jupiter to be better understood.[4] The gravity science experiment uses special hardware on Juno, and also on Earth.[5] GS uses the high-gain K-band and X-band communication system and communication systems on Earth of the Deep Space Network as well as special communication hardware on Juno called KaTS, or Ka-Band Translator System.[6][7] These components work together to detect minute changes in radio frequency, see Doppler shift, thus detecting the spacecraft's velocity over time.[8] The KaTS box was funded by the Italian Space Agency and overseen by a professor at University La Sapienza in Rome.[9] KaTS detects signals coming from the DSN on Earth, and then sends reply in a very precise way, that ultimately allows the velocity of Juno to hopefully be determined to within 0.001 millimeters per second.[10] The spacecraft receives a tone signal on the Ka-band but then replies using the X-band radio.[11]

As the spacecraft traverses the space near Jupiter, the planet, and even variations in the planets interior cause a variation in Juno velocity.[12] The gravity science experiment measures these velocity changes using a combination of hardware on Earth and the Spacecraft, which in turn allows the effect of gravity to be measured, and thus mass variations in Jupiter's interior.[13]

Communication signals:[14][15]

  • Deep Space Network 25 sends tone signal 32.5 GHZ (Ka-Band)
  • Juno KaTS sends tone signal at 35 GHZ (X-Band)

Juno launched in 2011 and arrived at Jupiter orbit in July 2016.[16]

The GS was planned out to be used on orbits 4, orbit 9, and orbits 10 through 32.[17] When GS operates it must point its antenna at Earth, and its is not operated simultaneously with the Microwave Radiometer instrument on Juno.[18]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Instrument Overview – Juno". spaceflight101.com. Retrieved 2017-01-05.
  2. ^ "Jupiter's Gravity Embraces NASA's Juno Spacecraft". Space.com. Retrieved 2017-01-05.
  3. ^ "Juno's Instruments | Mission Juno". Mission Juno. Retrieved 2017-01-05.
  4. ^ "Juno's Instruments | Mission Juno". Mission Juno. Retrieved 2017-01-05.
  5. ^ "Instrument Overview – Juno". spaceflight101.com. Retrieved 2017-01-05.
  6. ^ "Instrument Overview – Juno". spaceflight101.com. Retrieved 2017-01-05.
  7. ^ "European Involvement in Juno | Europlanet Outreach". www.europlanet-eu.org. Retrieved 2017-01-05.
  8. ^ [1]
  9. ^ "European Involvement in Juno | Europlanet Outreach". www.europlanet-eu.org. Retrieved 2017-01-05.
  10. ^ "European Involvement in Juno | Europlanet Outreach". www.europlanet-eu.org. Retrieved 2017-01-05.
  11. ^ "Instrument Overview – Juno". spaceflight101.com. Retrieved 2017-01-05.
  12. ^ "What will we learn from the Juno mission?". Science Focus. Retrieved 2017-01-05.
  13. ^ "What will we learn from the Juno mission?". Science Focus. Retrieved 2017-01-05.
  14. ^ "European Involvement in Juno | Europlanet Outreach". www.europlanet-eu.org. Retrieved 2017-01-05.
  15. ^ "Instrument Overview – Juno". spaceflight101.com. Retrieved 2017-01-05.
  16. ^ Greicius, Tony (2015-03-13). "Juno Spacecraft and Instruments". NASA. Retrieved 2017-01-04.
  17. ^ "Gravity Science Orbits". Mission Juno. Retrieved 2017-02-07.
  18. ^ "Gravity Science Orbits". Mission Juno. Retrieved 2017-02-07.

External links[edit]