Great Britain men's national ice hockey team

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Great Britain
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)Team GB
AssociationIce Hockey UK
General ManagerAndy Buxton
Head coachPeter Russell
AssistantsAdam Keefe
Corey Neilson
CaptainJonathan Phillips
Most gamesAshley Tait (110)
Most pointsTony Hand (107)
Team colors              
IIHF codeGBR
Ranking
Current IIHF22 Increase 2 (21 May 2018)[1]
Highest IIHF21 (2011)
Lowest IIHF31 (2006)
First international
Great Britain  3–0   Switzerland
(Chamonix, France; 23 January 1909)
Biggest win
Great Britain  26–0  New Zealand
(Geel or Heist-op-den-Berg, Belgium; 16 March 1989)
Biggest defeat
Yugoslavia  21–1  Great Britain
(Barcelona, Spain; 25 March 1979)
IIHF World Championships
Appearances54 (first in 1930)
Best resultSilver medal with cup.svg Silver (1937, 1938)
European Championships
Appearances3 (first in 1910)
Best resultGold medal with cup.svg Gold (1910)
Olympics
Appearances4 (first in 1924)
MedalsGold medal.svg Gold (1936)
Bronze medal.svg Bronze (1924)
International record (W–L–T)
203–222–36
Great Britain men's national ice hockey team
Medal record
Olympic Games
Gold medal – first place 1936 Germany Team
Bronze medal – third place 1924 France Team
World Championship
Silver medal – second place 1937 Great Britain
Silver medal – second place 1938 Czechoslovakia
Bronze medal – third place 1935 Switzerland

The British national ice hockey team (also known as Team GB) is the national men's ice hockey team of the United Kingdom. A founding member of the International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF) in 1908, the team is controlled by Ice Hockey UK.[2] Great Britain is currently ranked 22nd in the world by the IIHF as of the 2018 IIHF World Ranking,[3] while their highest IIHF ranking is 21st.

History[edit]

The team was a force on the international scene in the early 20th century, winning the first ever IIHF European Championship in 1910, finishing as bronze medalists at the 1924 Winter Olympics in Chamonix, France, and becoming Olympic champions in 1936 in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany.[4] The gold-medal winning Olympic team was composed primarily of dual-national British Canadians[disambiguation needed], many of whom having learned and played the game in Canada.[5][6]

However, since then the national team has made little impact on the sport. Until they surprisingly qualified for the 2019 instalment of the tournament, their last appearance in the top-level World Championship came in 1994. Great Britain last qualified for the Olympics in 1948.

The current head coach of the team is Peter Russell, who is also the head coach for the Glasgow Clan of the EIHL.

Tournament record[edit]

Olympic Games[edit]

The 1936 Winter Olympics gold medalists
Year Result
1924  Bronze
1928 4th place
1936  Gold
1948 5th place
Totals
Games Gold Silver Bronze Total
4 1 0 1 2
Games GP W OW T OL L GF GA Coach Captain Finish Rank
France 1924 Chamonix 5 3 0 0 0 2 40 38 George Elliot Clarkson ? Final Round 3rd, bronze medalist(s)
Switzerland 1928 St. Moritz 6 2 0 0 0 4 11 27 ? ? First round 4th
United States 1932 Lake Placid Did not participate
Nazi Germany 1936 Garmisch-Partenkirchen 7 5 0 2 0 0 17 3 Percy Nicklin Carl Erhardt Final Round 1st, gold medalist(s)
Switzerland 1948 St. Moritz 8 3 0 0 0 5 39 47 Carl Erhardt ? Round-robin 5th

World Championships[edit]

  • Germany / France / Austria 1930 – Tied in 10th place
  • Poland 1931 – Finished in 8th place
  • Italy 1934 – Finished in 8th place
  • Switzerland 1935 – won bronze medal
  • United Kingdom 1937 – won silver medal
  • Czechoslovakia 1938 – won silver medal
  • Switzerland 1939 – Finished in 8th place
  • United Kingdom 1950 – Finished in 4th place
  • France 1951 – Finished in 5th place
  • Belgium 1952 – Finished in 10th place (1st in the "B" pool)
  • Switzerland 1953 – Finished in 5th place (2nd in the "B" pool)
  • Switzerland 1961 – Finished in 10th place (2nd in the "B" pool, promoted)
  • United States 1962 – Finished in 8th place (relegated)
  • Sweden 1963 – Finished in 15th place (7th in the "B" pool)
  • Finland 1965 – Finished in 14th place (6th in the "B" pool)
  • Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia 1966 – Finished in 16th place (8th in the "B" pool, relegated)
  • Netherlands 1971 – Finished in 18th place (4th in the "C" pool)
  • Netherlands 1973 – Finished in 22nd place (8th in the "C" pool)
  • Poland 1976 – Finished in 21st place (5th in the "C" pool)
  • Denmark 1977 – Finished in 24th place (7th in the "C" pool)
  • Spain 1979 – Finished in 23rd place (5th in the "C" pool)
  • China 1981 – Finished in 24th place (8th in the "C" pool, relegated)
  • Belgium1989 – Finished in 27th place (3rd in the "D" pool)
  • United Kingdom 1990 – Finished in 26th place (1st in the "D" pool, promoted)
  • Denmark 1991 – Finished in 21st place (5th in the "C" pool)
  • United States 1992 – Finished in 21st place (1st in the "C" pool, promoted)
  • Netherlands 1993 – Finished in 13th place (1st in the "B" pool, promoted)
  • Italy 1994 – Finished in 12th place (relegated)
  • Slovakia 1995 – Finished in 19th place (7th in the "B" pool)
  • Netherlands1996 – Finished in 16th place (4th in the "B" pool)
  • Poland 1997 – Finished in 18th place (6th in the "B" pool)
  • Slovenia 1998 – Finished in 22nd place (6th in the "B" pool)
  • Denmark 1999 – Finished in 18th place (2nd in the "B" pool)
  • Poland 2000 – Finished in 19th place (3rd in the "B" pool)
  • Slovenia 2001 – Finished in 19th place (2nd in Division I, Group B)
  • Hungary 2002 – Finished in 23rd place (4th in Division I, Group B)
  • Croatia 2003 – Finished in 25th place (5th in Division I, Group B)
  • Norway 2004 – Finished in 25th place (5th in Division I, Group A)
  • Hungary 2005 – Finished in 24th place (4th in Division I, Group A)
  • France 2006 – Finished in 26th place (5th in Division I, Group A)
  • Slovenia 2007 – Finished in 24th place (4th in Division I, Group B)
  • Austria 2008 – Finished in 23rd place (4th in Division I, Group A)
  • Poland 2009 – Finished in 22nd place (3rd in Division I, Group B)
  • Slovenia 2010 – Finished in 23rd place (4th in Division I, Group B)
  • Ukraine 2011 – Finished in 20th place (2nd in Division I, Group B)
  • Slovenia 2012 – Finished in 21st place (5th in Division I, Group A)
  • Hungary 2013 – Finished in 22nd place (6th in Division I, Group A, relegated)
  • Lithuania 2014 – Finished in 26th place (4th in Division I, Group B)
  • Netherlands 2015 – Finished in 24th place (2nd in Division I, Group B)
  • Croatia 2016 – Finished in 24th place (2nd in Division I, Group B)
  • United Kingdom 2017 – Finished in 23rd place (1st in Division I, Group B, promoted)
  • Hungary 2018 – Finished in 17th place (1st in Division I, Group A, promoted)
  • Slovakia 2019

European Championships[edit]

Games GP W T L GF GA Coach Captain Finish Rank
Switzerland 1910 Les Avants 3 2 1 0 7 2 ? ? Round-robin 1st, gold medalist(s)
German Empire 1911 Berlin Did not participate
Austria-Hungary 1912 Prague* Did not participate
German Empire 1913 Munich Did not participate
German Empire 1914 Berlin Did not participate
1915–1920 No Championships (World War I).
Sweden 1921 Stockholm Did not participate
Switzerland 1922 St. Moritz Did not participate
Belgium 1923 Antwerp Did not participate
Italy 1924 Milan Did not participate
Czechoslovakia 1925 Štrbské Pleso, Starý Smokovec Did not participate
Switzerland 1926 Davos 7 3 0 4 26 19 ? ? Third round 4th
Austria 1927 Wien Did not participate
Hungary 1929 Budapest Did not participate
Germany 1932 Berlin 4 2 1 1 10 9 ? ? Consolation round 7th

Current roster[edit]

Roster for the 2019 IIHF World Championship.[7][8]

Head coach: Peter Russell

No. Pos. Name Height Weight Birthdate Team
1 G Jackson Whistle 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) 87 kg (192 lb) (1995-06-09) 9 June 1995 (age 23) United Kingdom Sheffield Steelers
2 D Dallas Ehrhardt 1.93 m (6 ft 4 in) 102 kg (225 lb) (1992-07-31) 31 July 1992 (age 26) United Kingdom Manchester Storm
4 D Stephen Lee 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 90 kg (200 lb) (1990-10-01) 1 October 1990 (age 28) United Kingdom Nottingham Panthers
5 F Ben Davies 1.72 m (5 ft 8 in) 75 kg (165 lb) (1991-01-18) 18 January 1991 (age 28) United Kingdom Guildford Flames
7 F Robert Lachowicz 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in) 76 kg (168 lb) (1990-02-08) 8 February 1990 (age 29) United Kingdom Nottingham Panthers
8 F Matthew Myers 1.89 m (6 ft 2 in) 93 kg (205 lb) (1984-11-06) 6 November 1984 (age 34) Wales Cardiff Devils
9 F Brett Perlini 1.88 m (6 ft 2 in) 91 kg (201 lb) (1990-06-14)14 June 1990 (aged 28) United Kingdom Nottingham Panthers
10 F Robert Farmer 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in) 94 kg (207 lb) (1991-03-21) 21 March 1991 (age 28) United Kingdom Nottingham Panthers
11 F Joseph Lewis 1.74 m (5 ft 9 in) 80 kg (180 lb) (1992-07-26) 26 July 1992 (age 26) Germany ESV Kaufbeuren
13 D David Phillips 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) 85 kg (187 lb) (1987-08-14) 14 August 1987 (age 31) United Kingdom Sheffield Steelers
14 F Liam Kirk 1.82 m (6 ft 0 in) 72 kg (159 lb) (2000-01-03) 3 January 2000 (age 19) Canada Peterborough Petes
17 D Mark RichardsonA 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 88 kg (194 lb) (1986-10-03) 3 October 1986 (age 32) Wales Cardiff Devils
19 F Colin Shields 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) 82 kg (181 lb) (1980-01-27) 27 January 1980 (age 39) United Kingdom Belfast Giants
20 F Jonathan PhillipsC 1.75 m (5 ft 9 in) 81 kg (179 lb) (1982-07-14) 14 July 1982 (age 36) United Kingdom Sheffield Steelers
21 F Mike Hammond 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in) 82 kg (181 lb) (1990-02-21) 21 February 1990 (age 29) United Kingdom Manchester Storm
23 D Paul Swindlehurst 1.93 m (6 ft 4 in) 90 kg (200 lb) (1993-03-25) 25 March 1993 (age 26) United Kingdom Belfast Giants
26 D Evan Mosey 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) 84 kg (185 lb) (1989-03-17) 17 March 1989 (age 30) Wales Cardiff Devils
27 F Luke Ferrara 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) 89 kg (196 lb) (1993-06-07) 7 June 1993 (age 25) United Kingdom Coventry Blaze
28 D Ben O’Connor 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) 85 kg (187 lb) (1988-12-21) 21 December 1988 (age 30) United Kingdom Sheffield Steelers
30 G Thomas Murdy 1.72 m (5 ft 8 in) 71 kg (157 lb) (1991-04-26) 26 April 1991 (age 28) Wales Cardiff Devils
33 G Ben Bowns 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 81 kg (179 lb) (1991-01-21) 21 January 1991 (age 28) Wales Cardiff Devils
54 D Tim Billingsley 1.88 m (6 ft 2 in) 91 kg (201 lb) (1990-01-17) 17 January 1990 (age 29) United Kingdom Nottingham Panthers
74 F Ollie Betteridge 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) 80 kg (180 lb) (1996-01-16) 16 January 1996 (age 23) United Kingdom Nottingham Panthers
75 F Robert DowdA 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in) 80 kg (180 lb) (1988-05-26) 26 May 1988 (age 30) United Kingdom Sheffield Steelers
91 F Ben Lake 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) 77 kg (170 lb) (1990-05-31) 31 May 1990 (age 28) United Kingdom Coventry Blaze

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "IIHF Men's World Ranking". IIHF. 21 May 2018. Retrieved 21 May 2018.
  2. ^ Sports Around the World: History, Culture, and Practice. Books.google.co.uk. p. 123. Retrieved 30 October 2016.
  3. ^ "2018 Ranking (May)". International Ice Hockey Federation. Retrieved 24 May 2018.
  4. ^ "Jeux Olympiques de Garmisch-Partenkirchen 1936 – Hockey sur glace". Hockeyarchives.info. Retrieved 30 October 2016.
  5. ^ Steve Pinder. "Ice Hockey: Britain complete 58-year circle: Today the British ice hockey team face Russia in their first appearance in a world championship since the 1936 Olympics. Steve Pinder reports". The Independent. Retrieved 30 October 2016.
  6. ^ "Team Great Britain made up of traitorous Canadians stole 1936 Olympic gold in ho". Calgarysun.com. Retrieved 30 October 2016.
  7. ^ "Russell names 25-man World Championship squad". icehockeyuk.co.uk. 22 April 2019.
  8. ^ 2019 IIHF World Championship roster

External links[edit]