Great Heck

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Great Heck
Great Heck, Heck Lane - geograph.org.uk - 89858.jpg
Great Heck, Heck Lane
Great Heck is located in North Yorkshire
Great Heck
Great Heck
 Great Heck shown within North Yorkshire
OS grid reference SE 59348 21069
Shire county North Yorkshire
Region Yorkshire and the Humber
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town Selby
Postcode district DN14
Police North Yorkshire
Fire North Yorkshire
Ambulance Yorkshire
EU Parliament Yorkshire and the Humber
List of places
UK
England
Yorkshire

Coordinates: 53°40′54″N 1°06′23″W / 53.681646°N 1.106513°W / 53.681646; -1.106513

Great Heck is a small village that lies a few miles south of Selby, North Yorkshire, England. Great Heck is located 185.4 miles (298.4 km) north of London and 26.3 miles (42.3 km) east of Leeds. The population of Great Heck was 201 people according to the 2011 census.[1] It is part of the district of Selby. The village was the site of the Great Heck rail crash.

Village[edit]

The village of Great Heck is a rural community. It consists of mainly detached residential housing and small companies such as Great Heck Brewery. It also comprises a number of farms and a nursery.

Demographics[edit]

population of Great Heck from 1881-2011

Population[edit]

The first recorded census occurred in 1881 with the population being 226.[2] A census was carried out every ten years up until 1961. Information and statistics were available on total population, population change, gender and area throughout the time the census were being carried out.[3] There are no census records for 1941 due to the Second World War. There is no great change in population from 1881 to 1961, although in 1931 the census data showed a population of 192 and in 1951 it had decreased to 165. This may have been the result of the Second World War. From 1961 the census data began gathering information from some places by wards and no longer by parishes.[4]

The 2011 census showed a population of 201, with the male:female ratio as even as possible with 101 females and 100 males living in 80 households.[5] The census shows that Great Heck consists of mainly families, with 43 people being aged between 5–19 years old and 93 people being aged between 30–59 years old.[6] Out of 201 people, 193 were born in England.[7]

Occupation data for Great Heck in 1881

Occupational structure[edit]

The 1881 census provides information on the occupational category the population fall into. The data shows that 36 of the 116 males worked in agriculture while the other male workers were spread out in categories including transport, food and lodging and textile fabrics. Contrastingly, the female data shows that 39 of 110 had unknown occupations. Other women worked in occupational categories such as agriculture and domestic services.[8]

According to the 2011 census there were 111 people employed out of 201[9] and out of the 111 people, 57 of them were male and 54 were female.[10] The most popular categories of employment were wholesale and retail trade, construction and manufacturing.[11]

Transport[edit]

Road[edit]

Great Heck is accessible through a number of lanes such as Heck and Pollington Lane, Heck Lane and Long Lane. Following Heck Lane and then taking a right turning into Baine Moor Road, you will eventually meet the A19 Road or Selby Road. This road joins up with the M62 motorway. There are 3 bus routes serving the parish Great Heck. The 486 bus travels from Selby to Hut green, stopping at five other locations in between including Great Heck. The 488 travels from Hut Green to Goole before stopping at seven other destinations including Great Heck. The 019s bus is a school service bus taking pupils to and from Holy Family RC School and The Snaith School.[12] The Nearest coach stop is Goole: Airmyn Road Coach Stop.[13]

Rail[edit]

There is no railway station in Great Heck, the nearest railway station is Hensall Rail Station which is 1.2 miles away. Whitley Bridge railway station and Snaith railway station are also very close to Great Heck.[14]

Great Heck rail crash[edit]

The Great Heck rail crash, also known as the Selby rail crash, was a high speed train accident that occurred on the morning of the 28 February 2001. 10 people were killed, including the drivers of both trains while another 82 people suffered serious injuries. The crash occurred when a Land Rover towing a loaded trailer swerved off the M62 motorway just before a bridge over the East Coast Main Line. The vehicle then ran down an emnbankment and onto the South Bound rail track. The driver of the Land Rover, Gary Neil Hart, tried to reverse the car off the track but could not. After exiting the vehicle and calling the emergency services, the Land Rover was hit by a Southbound GNER InterCity 225 heading from Newcastle to London Kings Cross. The train was travelling at over 120 miles per hour (190 km per hour). The InterCity 225 was propelled by a Class 91 locomotive (No.91023) and led by a Driving Van Trailer (DVT). After striking the Land Rover, the leading bogie of the DVT derailed but the train stayed upright. Points to nearby sidings then deflected it into the path of an oncoming Freightliner freight train carrying coal.[15] The freight train was travelling from Immingham to Ferrybridge. The freight train hit the wreckage resulting in severe to moderate damage to all nine of the InterCity 225's coaches. Just before the impact of the two trains, the speed of the InterCity 225 was estimated at 88 mph (142 km/h) while the freight train was travelling at an estimated speed of 54 mph (87 km/h). The closing speed was said to be 142 mph (229 km/h) making it the highest speed railway incident in the UK.[16]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Heck (Parish):Key Figures for 2011 Census: Key Statistics". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 12 May 2013. 
  2. ^ Bartholomew, John (1887). Gazetteer of the British Isles. Edinborough: Bartholomew. Retrieved 10 March 2013. 
  3. ^ Bartholomew, John (1887). Gazetteer of the British Isles (1st ed.). Edinburgh: Bartholomew. Retrieved 10 March 2013. 
  4. ^ Bartholomew, John (1887). Gazetteer of the British Isles (1st ed.). Edinburgh: Bartholomew. Retrieved 10 March 2013. 
  5. ^ "Great Heck (parish): key figures for 2011 statistics: key statistics". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 11 March 2013. 
  6. ^ "Great Heck (parish): key figures for 2011 census: key statistics". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 11 March 2013. 
  7. ^ "Great Heck (parish): key figures for 2011 census: key statistics". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 11 March 2013. 
  8. ^ Bartholomew, John (1887). Gazetteer of the British Isles (1st ed.). Edinburgh: Bartholomew. Retrieved 12 March 2013. 
  9. ^ "Great Heck (parish): key figures for 2011 census: key statistics". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 13 March 2013. 
  10. ^ "Great Heck (parish): key figures for 2011 census:". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 13 March 2013. 
  11. ^ "Great Heck (parish): key figures for 2011 census: key statistics". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 13 March 2013. 
  12. ^ "Great Heck (parish): Bus routes for Great Heck". transport links. northyorkstravel. Retrieved 15 March 2013. 
  13. ^ "Great Heck (parish): nearest stations". Transport information. Transport Direct. Retrieved 15 March 2013. 
  14. ^ "Great Heck (parish): transport". Train stations. Transport direct. Retrieved 15 March 2013. 
  15. ^ "Rail crash 'unavoidable' - report". London: Mail Online. 24 February 2011. Retrieved 24 February 2011. 
  16. ^ Wainwright, Martin (5 December 2002). "Rail crash enquiry". closing speed (London: Guardian). Retrieved 18 March 2013. 

External links[edit]

Media related to Great Heck at Wikimedia Commons