Great Truckin' Songs of the Renaissance

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Great Truckin' Songs of the Renaissance
Greattruckin'songs.jpg
Studio album by TISM
Released 26 September 1988
Recorded
  • Platinum Studios May 1987, January-March 1988
  • Trees Studios, Melbourne 3RRR Studios, Electric Leakland Premises
  • The Venue, St. Kilda 5 February 1988
  • Trade Union Club, Sydney 11-12 December 1987
Genre Alternative rock
Length 69:48
Label Elvis
Producer TISM
TISM chronology
Form and Meaning reach Ultimate Communion
(1986)
Great Truckin' Songs of the Renaissance
(1988)
Hot Dogma (1990)

Great Truckin' Songs of the Renaissance is the debut album by the Australian band TISM. The title was suggested by Leek Van Vlalen's friend, the Sydney University philosopher, Michaelis Michael. Originally released on vinyl as a double album on 26 September 1988, it was re-issued by Shock Records as a lone compact disc. The album reached No. 48 on the ARIA Charts in October 1988.[1]

The vinyl version has a different vocal mix on the track, "Saturday Night Palsy", including an alternate line of lyrics, with the line "I want to shoot heroin through the eye" replaced by "I want to shove a red-hot poker through the eye" on the CD.

Reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 4.5/5 stars[2]

The Age's Shaun Carney, in September 1988, described Great Truckin' Songs of the Renaissance as "a fine piece of work. Clever clever they might be on occasions, but if a few more bands applied even half the humor, social observation and melodic intervention that TISM seems to simply toss off, the world would be a, um, groovier place."[3]

Jonathan Lewis of AllMusic rated the album as four-and-a-half stars out of five, he explained "Completely tasteless and musically mediocre, the album was nonetheless fresh, witty, and extremely funny. The album is more or less standard guitar rock, but it is the song lyrics that make this album great."[2]

In December 2004 FasterLouder's Kathryn Kernohan felt the group had "always written simple, direct pop songs... [their] basic structure has remained the same – danceable guitar and keyboard lines coupled with catchy choruses. The band’s ability to write a ridiculously good pop song is second-to-none and this is no better exemplified than in Great Truckin’ Songs opening tracks."[4] She noticed that "The second record of the double-vinyl set (it's not as much fun on CD, is it?) contains various odds and ends, including snippets of a Triple R interview in which the band rode into the studio on lawnmowers."[4]

Track listing[edit]

No. Title Length
1. "I'm Interested in Apathy" 2:55
2. "Saturday Night Palsy" 3:21
3. "The Mystery of the Artist Explained" 3:09
4. "If You're Creative, Get Stuffed" 3:01
5. "40 Years – Then Death" 4:18
6. "Anarchy Means Crossing When It Says "Don't Walk"" 1:31
7. "The Ballad of John Bonham's Coke Roadie" 2:37
8. "Choose Bad Smack" 3:00
9. "The Fosters Car Park Boogie" 2:37
10. "Martin Scorsese Is Really Quite a Jovial Fellow" 3:01
11. "I Drive a Truck" 2:12
12. "Defecate on My Face" 4:42
This Record Isn't As Good As the Other One
No. Title Length
13. "Kill Americans" 2:16
14. "Volare" 0:58
15. "The Penis is Mightier than the Sword" 2:17
16. "Slave to the Economist" 0:52
17. "I Shit Me" 2:47
18. "Doug Parkinson Sings Christie Allen" 0:55
19. "Gimme Gimme Nervous Breakdown" 2:31
20. "The Ballad of the Semitic Nazi" 0:39
21. "And the Ass Said to the Angel: "Wanna Play Kick-to-Kick"?" 3:59
22. "The Mordialloc Road Duplicator" 3:41
23. "Jack Elliot's Turf Whinge" 1:12
24. "Ezra Pound-Axe King" 1:35
25. "Johnny To B. Or Not To B. Goode" 0:26
26. "Morrison Hostel" 7:48
27. Untitled (Unlisted) 1:08

Personnel[edit]

  • Ron Hitler-Barassi (Peter Minack) - lead vocals
  • Humphrey B. Flaubert (Damian Cowell) - lead vocals, drum programming, drums, backing vocals
  • Jock Cheese (John Holt) - bass, backing vocals
  • Eugene de la Hot Croix Bun (Eugene Cester) - keyboards, lead vocals, backing vocals
  • Leek Van Vlalen (Sean Kelly) - guitar, backing vocals
  • John St. Peenis (Mark Fessey) - saxophone, lead vocals, backing vocals

Singles[edit]

"40 Years – Then Death"[edit]

"40 Years - Then Death"
Single by TISM
from the album Great Truckin' Songs of the Renaissance
B-side The Back Upon Which Jezza Jumped
Released 23 September 1987
Format Vinyl
Recorded May 1987, Platinum Studios
Genre Alternative rock
Length 4:18
Label Elvis
Writer(s) TISM
TISM singles chronology
"Defecate on My Face
(1986)
"40 Years - Then Death"
(1986)
"The Ballad Of John Bonham's Coke Roadie"
(1988)

"40 Years – Then Death" is a 1987 single by Australian alternative rock band TISM. It was originally released on white vinyl in a clear plastic wrapper with no identifying labels of any kind.

Lyrics[edit]

"40 Years – Then Death" details an early-twenties male's despondent view of his remaining sex life: 40 more years of "living" then "death". The single earned TISM recognition as their earlier single "Defecate on My Face" was very infrequently played on radio, if at all; where this single was quite radio friendly. The snippet after the main song, "Art, Religion and the Neo-Classical Dialectic", part of a longer piece, "Ezra Pound, Axe-King", which has nothing to do with the song from Great Truckin' Songs of the Renaissance and was released in full on Best Off in 2002.

Track listing[edit]

  1. "40 Years – Then Death"
  2. "Art, Religion and the Neo-Classical Dialectic" (unlisted)
  3. "The Back Upon Which Jezza Jumped"

"The Ballad of John Bonham's Coke Roadie"[edit]

"The Ballad of John Bonham's Coke Roadie"
Single by TISM
from the album Great Truckin' Songs of the Renaissance
B-side (I Think I've Got) Mick Jagger Worked Out
Released May 1988
Format 7", digital download
Recorded May 1987-March 1988, Platinum Studios
Genre Alternative rock
Length 2:37
Label Elvis/Musicland
Writer(s) TISM
TISM singles chronology
"40 Years – Then Death"
(1987)
"The Ballad of John Bonham's Coke Roadie"
(1988)
"I'm Interested in Apathy"
(1988)

"The Ballad of John Bonham's Coke Roadie" is a single released by TISM in May 1988. It was released off their debut album, Great Truckin' Songs of the Renaissance (1988).

Lyrics[edit]

"The Ballad of John Bonham's Coke Roadie" deals with the assistant to Led Zeppelin drummer, John Bonham, whose job was to procure cocaine for the musician. Throughout the song the musician compares his life to that of an ordinary person whose life is racked with misery and spousal unfaithfulness, contrasted with that of the roadie, whose only concern is the acquisition of cocaine.

Track listing[edit]

  1. The Ballad of John Bonham's Coke Roadie
  2. (I Think I've Got) Mick Jagger Worked Out

"I'm Interested in Apathy"[edit]

"I'm Interested In Apathy"
Single by TISM
from the album Great Truckin' Songs of the Renaissance
B-side Gas! Gas! – An Ecstasy of Fumbling
The Judeo-Christian Ethic
Released November 1988
Format 7" vinyl, 12" vinyl, digital download
Recorded May 1987-March 1988, Platinum Studios
Genre Alternative rock
Length 2:55
Label Musicland/Elvis
Writer(s) TISM
TISM singles chronology
"The Ballad of John Bonham's Coke Roadie"
(1987)
"I'm Interested in Apathy"
(1988)
"Saturday Night Palsy"
(1988)

"I'm Interested in Apathy" is a single by TISM. It was released in November 1988 from their debut album, Great Truckin' Songs of the Renaissance (1988). The title is an oxymoron as apathy is literally a "lack of interest". A 12" version, with a bonus track, was issued in December 1988.

Lyrics[edit]

"I'm Interested in Apathy" details the life of a man who has many ideas which range from either life saving, supernatural, answers to conspiracy theories or simply absurd abilities; however, none of these things faze him, nor does he act upon them, because his main focus is apathy. His interest in apathy even prevents him from properly finishing the song, which ends with "Well, here we are at the last verse / I've lost interest."

Among the things the main claims to know or be able to do are: drilling for oil in the Bass Strait, being able to prove Einstein's theory wrong, predicting mankind's fate and knowing what really happened in regards to Marilyn Monroe's death.

Track listing[edit]

  1. "I'm Interested In Apathy"
  2. "Gas! Gas! – An Ecstasy of Fumbling"
  3. "The Judeo-Christian Ethic" (Only on 12")

"Saturday Night Palsy"[edit]

"Saturday Night Palsy"
Single by TISM
from the album Great Truckin' Songs of the Renaissance
B-side Pus
Released January 1989
Format 7" single
Recorded May 1987-March 1988, Platinum Studios
Genre Alternative rock
Length 03:21
Label Musicland/Elvis
Writer(s) TISM
TISM singles chronology
"I'm Interested in Apathy"
(1988)
"Saturday Night Palsy"
(1989)
"Martin Scorsese Is Really Quite a Jovial Fellow"
(1989)

"Saturday Night Palsy" is a single by TISM. It was released in January 1989 off their debut album, Great Truckin' Songs of the Renaissance (1988). It was their second single to have a music video.

The title is not an amalgam of the film, Saturday Night Fever (1977), and the medical condition, palsy, but it is a reference to radial neuropathy, commonly known as "Saturday Night Palsy", a condition akin to falling asleep on your arm.

Lyrics[edit]

"Saturday Night Palsy" focuses on a man who has the inability to decide on matters, particularly, in which manner to harm himself. The song continues through with various opposing scenarios offered by the man, but at the end nothing has been resolved. It is one of the more nonsensical songs offered by TISM which surprisingly became a wide hit.

The version of this song currently available differs from the recording originally released on vinyl and cassette in 1988. At some point before the song was released as a single, the lead vocal was mostly re-recorded. During this process the second line of the first verse was altered from the original, "I want to shoot heroin through the eye" to "I want to shove a red-hot poker through the eye". All subsequent releases of the album (and all CD releases) contained the re-recorded version of the song.

Video[edit]

A music video was made by Peter Bain-Hog which featured a handsome man spending his day getting ready to go out dancing. Eventually he finds himself outside of a TISM concert and denied entry, at the end of the video, he is so dejected by the experience that he commits suicide by hanging himself in a nearby alley.

The video was intended to parody other similar video clips of the time which showed good looking people dressing up, going out and enjoying themselves, however the final scene was cut from many broadcasts "in a superb act of bowdlerisation, thus rendering the clip exactly the same as every other slickly produced clip of groovy models having a good time."[5]

Hey Hey It's Saturday performance[edit]

After the single was released, TISM were invited to perform it on the Australian variety TV show, Hey Hey It's Saturday. As the song began, the seven members performing it were joined by seven more and before the song ended, a further fourteen, for a total of 28 so-called band members.[5]

Track listing[edit]

  1. "Saturday Night Palsy"
  2. "Pus"

"Martin Scorsese Is Really Quite a Jovial Fellow"[edit]

"Martin Scorsese Is Really Quite a Jovial Fellow"
Single by TISM
from the album Great Truckin' Songs of the Renaissance
B-side Babies Bite Back
Released June 1989
Format 7" vinyl
Recorded May 1987-March 1988, Platinum Studios
Genre Alternative rock
Length 3:01
Label Musicland/Elvis
Writer(s) TISM
TISM singles chronology
"Saturday Night Palsy"
(1989)
"Martin Scorsese Is Really Quite a Jovial Fellow"
(1989)
"I Don't Want TISM, I Want A Girlfriend"
(1989)

"Martin Scorsese Is Really Quite a Jovial Fellow" is a single by TISM issued in June 1989. It was the last single released off their debut album, Great Truckin' Songs of the Renaissance (1988).

Lyrics[edit]

"Martin Scorsese Is Really Quite a Jovial Fellow" deals with the dark and often depressing nature of Scorsese's subjects and the way that a normally happy or perky person would also be quite depressed after watching one of his films. In the years leading up to the song's development, director, Martin Scorsese, had released Raging Bull (1980) and The King of Comedy (1983). The song also mentions the relationship between the director and the actor, Robert De Niro, frequently cast in Scorsese's films.

Track listing[edit]

  1. "Martin Scorsese Is Really Quite a Jovial Fellow"
  2. "Babies Bite Back"

Demo tape[edit]

Great Truckin' Songs of the Renaissance
Demo album by TISM
Released n/a
Recorded Minack residence, 30 December 1982
Genre Alternative rock
Label Private release
TISM chronology
n/a Great Truckin' Songs of the Renaissance
(1982)

In 1982, TISM (consisting then of just three members) recorded a tape of demo songs titled Great Truckin' Songs of the Renaissance. It is the earliest known recording by the band and has little to do with the album of the same name. It was recorded on 30 December 1982 at the home of Ron Hitler-Barassi. The vocalist on this tape is Humphrey B. Flaubert.

Track list[edit]

  1. Eckermann is Very Silly
  2. The Ballad of the Semitic Nazi
  3. Yassa Arathin-a-Go-Go
  4. I Go to Werribee
  5. Pus of the Dead
  6. United He Stands Divided He Is Not United Anymore
  7. Stiff's Luck
  8. Sweetbread Ain't No Honky Carcinogen
  9. Instant Party

Tracks 1-4 were eventually released on Best Off disc 2. Re-recorded versions of tracks 1, 4 and 5 appear on This Is Serious Mum.

Crew[edit]

  • Damian Cowell (Humphrey B. Flaubert) - vocals, drums
  • John Holt (Jock Cheese) - guitar, bass
  • Eugene Cester (Eugene de la Hot-Croix Bun) - keyboards

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hung, Steffen. "Discography TISM". Australian Charts Portal. Hung Medien (Steffen Hung). Retrieved 18 August 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Lewis, Jonathan. "Great Truckin' Songs of the Renaissance – T.I.S.M.". AllMusic. Retrieved 2011-10-17. 
  3. ^ Carney, Shaun (30 September 1988). "The Age - Google News Archive Search". The Age. Fairfax Media. Retrieved 18 August 2016. 
  4. ^ a b Kernohan, Kathryn (5 December 2004). "TISM – Great Truckin' Songs of the Renaissance". FasterLouder. Junkee Media. Retrieved 18 August 2016. 
  5. ^ a b "TISM – The History of This Is Serious Mum (1989)" (2000). Archived on 2000-12-06 by the Internet Archive. Retrieved on 2007-10-16.