Greater Manchester Police and Crime Commissioner

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Greater Manchester Police and Crime Commissioner
GMPCC logo.jpg
Police and crime commissioner of Greater Manchester Police
Appointer Electorate of Greater Manchester
Term length Four years
Constituting instrument Police Reform and Social Responsibility Act 2011
Precursor Greater Manchester Police Authority
Formation 21 November 2012
Final holder Tony Lloyd
Abolished 8 May 2017
Deputy Deputy Police and Crime Commissioner
Salary £100,000
Website gmpcc.org.uk

The Greater Manchester Police and Crime Commissioner was the police and crime commissioner, an elected official tasked with setting out the way crime is tackled by the Greater Manchester Police in Greater Manchester. The post was created on 21 November 2012, following an election held on 15 November 2012, and replaced the Greater Manchester Police Authority. Upon the creation of a Mayor of Greater Manchester and the inaugural election to that position, the duties of Greater Manchester Police and Crime Commissioner were absolved into the mayoralty and the office itself abolished. For the entirety of its existence, the commissioner was Labour Party politician Tony Lloyd.[1] The police and crime commissioner was required to produce a strategic Greater Manchester Police and Crime Plan, setting out the priorities for the Greater Manchester Police, and their work is scrutinised by the Greater Manchester Police and Crime Panel. In November 2014 it was announced that the role would be replaced with a directly elected Mayor of Greater Manchester, and the term of office of the incumbent commissioner was extended to May 2017.[2]

Dale Cregan escorts[edit]

Tony Lloyd criticised the Home Secretary Theresa May for allowing the daily prison escorts of Dale Cregan from Strangeways Prison to Preston Crown Court. He claimed the operation put officers at risk and was unnecessary. Escorting Cregan and his co-accused cost over £5 million. Lloyd Said “So it appears that common sense can be scattered to the wind if you don’t have to pick up the tab. In the end, of course, we’ve all had to pay for this operation because, although the Home Office have agreed to cover some of the costs, the taxpayer is still significantly out of pocket at a time when finances across the public sector are stretched so much.”[3]

Firearms licences[edit]

in 2013 Lloyd backed calls to increase the fee for a firearms certificate because of the shortfall in costs for Greater Manchester Police to carry out background checks.[4]

Elections[edit]

2012[edit]

Greater Manchester Police and Crime Commissioner election, 2012 [5][6][7]
Party Candidate 1st Round  % Transfers 2nd Round  %  First Round Votes  Transfer Votes 
Labour Tony Lloyd 139,437 51.23%
Conservative Michael Winstanley 42,478 15.61%
Liberal Democrat Matt Gallagher 40,318 14.81%
Independent Roy Warren 26,664 9.80%
UKIP Steven Woolfe 23,256 8.55%
Turnout 272,153 13.59%
Rejected ballots 6,823 2.45%
Total votes 278,976 13.93
Registered electors 2,002,309
Labour win

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ "GMPCC About". Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner. 5 November 2012. Retrieved 30 November 2013. 
  2. ^ Williams, Jennifer (31 October 2014). "Revealed: Greater Manchester Will Get an Elected 'Boris-style' Mayor – and a £1bn Boost in Devolution Deal". Manchester Evening News. Retrieved 5 May 2016. 
  3. ^ "Tony Lloyd Slams Unnecessary Cregan Convoys Which Put Lives At Risk". Manchester Gazette. 14 June 2013. Retrieved 1 December 2013. 
  4. ^ "Manchester Police Commissioner Calls for Fair Price Firearms License". Manchester Gazette. 29 October 2013. Retrieved 1 December 2013. 
  5. ^ "Declaration in the Event a Candidate Receives Majority at First Count (Rule 62)". Manchester City Council. 16 November 2012. 
  6. ^ "Greater Manchester Police and Crime Commissioner Election – Verification Statement". Manchester City Council. 16 November 2012. 
  7. ^ "First Count Calculation Sheet". Manchester City Council. 16 November 2012.