Greed: Difference between revisions

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[[Image:The worship of Mammon.jpg|250px|thumb|1909 painting ''The Worship of [[Mammon]]'' by [[Evelyn De Morgan]].]]
 
[[Image:The worship of Mammon.jpg|250px|thumb|1909 painting ''The Worship of [[Mammon]]'' by [[Evelyn De Morgan]].]]
   
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'''Greed''' is the desire for the pursuit of [[money]], [[wealth]], [[Power (sociology)|power]], [[food]], or other [[possessions]], especially when this denies the same goods to others. It is generally considered a [[vice]], and is one of the [[seven deadly sins]] in [[Catholicism]].
 
'''Greed''' is the desire for the pursuit of [[money]], [[wealth]], [[Power (sociology)|power]], [[food]], or other [[possessions]], especially when this denies the same goods to others. It is generally considered a [[vice]], and is one of the [[seven deadly sins]] in [[Catholicism]].
   

Revision as of 04:01, 3 April 2009

1909 painting The Worship of Mammon by Evelyn De Morgan.

lop86

Greed is the desire for the pursuit of money, wealth, power, food, or other possessions, especially when this denies the same goods to others. It is generally considered a vice, and is one of the seven deadly sins in Catholicism.

Greed versus happiness

Buddhists believe greed is based on incorrectly connecting material wealth with happiness. This is caused by a view that exaggerates the positive aspects of an object; that is, acquiring material objects has less impact than we imagine on our feelings of happiness. This view has been corroborated by studies in the field of happiness economics, which confirm that beyond the provision of a basic level of material comfort, more wealth does not increase happiness.

Greed and idolatry

Greed is a form of idolatry, according to the Bible (Colossians 3:5). The most common explanation is that the greedy person values money or possessions more than God. This may also be connected with worship of the golden calf. Another understanding is that greed serves to bring as many things that the greedy person considers valuables to that person, making him the center of his efforts, the one he aims to please, converting him into his own god, and creating pride with great concentration on the ego.

Literature

References

See also

External links