Green Bus Lines

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
A former Green Line Q40 MCI Classic in South Jamaica, Queens.

Green Bus Lines, also referred to simply as Green Lines, was a private bus company in New York City, United States, managed most recently by the late Jerome Cooper (August 14, 1928 - May 20, 2015 aged 86), operating local service in Queens and express service to Manhattan until January 9, 2006, when the city-operated MTA Bus Company took over its routes. Green Bus Lines routes primarily operated in the Jamaica, Ozone Park, Howard Beach, and Rockaway areas of Queens, along with service to the passenger and cargo areas of John F. Kennedy International Airport.[1][2] At the time of its closure, Green Lines operated more local and limited bus routes than any other private company in the city.[1]

Stockholders of Green Bus Lines also held control of other private bus companies in Queens and Brooklyn as Transit Alliance. These companies were Triboro Coach, Jamaica Buses, and Command Bus Company, all of which were absorbed into the MTA Regional Bus operations.[3][4] The company reorganized as GTJ Reit Inc., a real estate investment trust, shortly after MTA takeover.

History[edit]

The company was incorporated on April 3, 1925 by William Cooper (1895-1985, aged 90) to provide local service in several boroughs. Cooper originally began operating a single bus line in 1922.[5] The company was formed from several independently-operated bus lines, whose owners operated the buses, and would become stockholders and employees in Green Lines.[5][6][7][8]

The company acquired several Manhattan routes (including the current M22, M50, M79, M86, and M96) in 1933, but these were transferred to the Comprehensive Omnibus Corporation in 1935 and New York City Omnibus Corporation in 1936.[9] In 1936, Green Lines was awarded the rights to all of "Zone C" in southern Queens (including Woodhaven, Richmond Hill, Ozone Park, Howard Beach, and the Rockaways). Green Lines assumed the operations of seven other companies in the region.[6][7][10][11][12][13][14] Green also acquired the Manhattan and Queens Bus Corporation, which had operated the ex-Manhattan and Queens Traction Company Queens Boulevard Line into Manhattan (the Q60) since 1937, in 1943.[15]

Green stockholders acquired two other transit companies that continued to operate independently: Triboro Coach Corporation in October 1947, and Jamaica Buses in April 1949.[5][4] Jointly these three companies formed Command Bus Company to take over the routes that had been operated by Pioneer Bus Corporation.[4]

The QM23 was started in the 1950s to replace Long Island Rail Road service to the Brooklyn Manor station on the Rockaway Beach Branch.[16] It was discontinued in 2010. Four more express routes began operation in the 1970s.

Bus routes[edit]

Just prior to MTA Bus takeover, Green Bus lines operated the following routes, which mostly continued to be based in Far Rockaway Bus Depot and John F. Kennedy Bus Depot.[17][18] Hubs for Green Lines operations included 165th Street Bus Terminal in Jamaica, the Mott Avenue subway station in Far Rockaway, and several stations in the IND Queens Boulevard Line.[2][19][20][21][22]

Route Terminal A Major streets of travel Terminal B Notes
Queens Local
Q6 Jamaica
165th Street Bus Terminal
Bays 14, 15, 16
Jamaica Avenue, Sutphin Boulevard,
Rockaway Boulevard, North Boundary Road
JFK International Airport
North Cargo Road and Eastern Road, and USPS Airport Mail Facility
  • Originally operated by Queens Bus Corporation, it first operated on July 19, 1922.[23]
  • Extended to 165th Street Terminal ca. 1989.[19]
  • Q6Limited service added by MTA on April 19, 2010.[24][25]
  • Does not serve passenger terminals.
Q7 City Line, Brooklyn
Euclid Avenue and Pitkin Avenue
at Euclid Avenue ( A   C  trains)
Pitkin Avenue, Rockaway Boulevard, 150th Street JFK International Airport
148th Street and South Cargo Road
  • Originally operated by the Ruoff Brothers, it started service on October 5, 1921 as DP&S Route 66.[26]
  • Does not serve passenger terminals.
Q8 Jamaica
165th Street Bus Terminal
Bay 17 and 18
Jamaica Avenue, 101st Avenue, Fountain Avenue Spring Creek, Brooklyn
Gateway Center Mall
  • Service started on April 15, 1933.[26]
  • Extended to 165th Street Terminal ca. 1989[19]
  • Extended from City Line at Euclid Avenue to Spring Creek at Gateway Drive and Erskine Street on June 29, 2008.[27]
  • Extended to new bus terminal at Gateway Center North on August 31, 2014.[28]
  • Alternate rush hour buses terminate/start at Euclid Avenue and Pitkin Avenue( A   C  trains)
Q9 Jamaica
165th Street Bus Terminal
Bay 19 and 20
Jamaica Avenue, Supthin Boulevard,
Liberty Avenue, 135th Street (Northbound),
Van Wyck Expressway Service Road
(Southbound), Lincoln Street.
South Ozone Park
Rockaway Boulevard and Lincoln Street
  • Originally operated by Ludwig Billow, it started service on May 1, 1920, as DP&S Route 55.[26]
  • Extended to 165th Street Terminal ca. 1989[19]
Q9A Jamaica
165th Street Bus Terminal
Lincoln Street, Linden Boulevard, Merrick Boulevard South Ozone Park
Rockaway Boulevard and Lincoln Street
  • Under MTA, became Q89 on April 7, 2008.[29][30]
  • Discontinued June 27, 2010 due to budget crisis.[31]
  • Operated one trip per hour in each direction between 10 AM and 5 PM weekdays;[2][30][32] only bus route in New York City to not serve any subway or rail stations along its route.[22]
Q10 Kew Gardens
80th Road and Kew Gardens Road
at Kew Gardens – Union Turnpike ( E   F  trains)
Lefferts Boulevard, Rockaway Boulevard, 130th Street, Van Wyck Expressway Service Road JFK International Airport
Terminal 5
  • Originally operated by Richmond Hill Bus, service began on April 29, 1929, as DP&S Route 53.[26]
  • Acquired by Green Bus Lines on November 25, 1936.
  • Expanded to Idlewild Airport in 1947.
  • Q10A existed between 1990 and 1996.
  • JFK Terminus moved to Terminal 5 on May 30, 2012, due to construction at Terminal 4.[33]
  • Some daytime trips operate only between Kew Gardens and South Ozone Park, and do not enter the airport.
  • Local/Limited to JFK Airport's Central Terminal Areas
Q11 Elmhurst
Queens Boulevard and Woodhaven Boulevard
at Woodhaven Boulevard ( E   M   R  trains) and Queens Center Mall
Woodhaven Boulevard, Cross Bay Boulevard, then:
  • Toward Howard Beach: 160th Avenue, 99th Street
  • Toward Hamilton Beach: 104th Street.
  • Originally operated by Liberty Bus, service was started in 1918, as DP&S Route 64.[26]
  • Acquired by Green Bus Lines in the early-1930s.
  • Weekday rush hours, some southbound service terminates at Pitkin Avenue and Cross Bay Boulevard in Ozone Park.
  • Overnight service to Old Howard Beach and Hamilton Beach eliminated September 12, 2010;[34] service to Hamilton Beach after 10:00 PM eliminated on July 1, 2012.[35][36][37]
  • Overnights, the southern terminal is at Pitkin Avenue and Cross Bay Boulevard.
Q21 Woodhaven Boulevard, 155th Avenue, 157th Avenue, Cross Bay Boulevard Howard Beach
164th Avenue and 92nd Street
  • Originally owned by Queens Auto Traction, service began in 1923.[26]
  • Operates via Lindenwood between Howard Beach and Ozone Park via 157th Avenue.[35]
  • Formerly ran from Liberty Avenue to Rockaway Park;[22] extended along Woodhaven Boulevard on August 31, 2008.[38][39]
  • Rerouted from Rockaway Park to Arverne on January 8, 2012.[40][41][42]
  • Truncated from Arverne to Howard Beach in July 2012 (Rockaway service replaced by Q52).[35][40]
Q21A Far Rockaway
Mott Avenue and Beach 20th Street
at Far Rockaway – Mott Avenue ( A  train)
Edgemere Avenue, Cross Bay Boulevard, Pitkin Avenue, Linden Boulevard East New York, Brooklyn[43] Discontinued in 1989 or 1990, due to poor ridership.
Q22 Beach Channel Drive, Rockaway Beach Boulevard Roxbury
Beach 169th Street and Rockaway Point Boulevard
Originally owned by Long Island Coach Company, service began in 1912.[26]
Q22A Mott Avenue Bayswater
  • Discontinued in 2008. Operated by Green Bus Lines until MTA takeover in 2005.[2][22][32]
  • Operated one morning trip to Mott Avenue and one afternoon trip to Bayswater only.[2][22][32]
Q35 Midwood, Brooklyn
Avenue H and Flatbush Avenue
at Flatbush Avenue ( 2   5  trains)
Flatbush Avenue, Newport Avenue Rockaway Park
Beach 116th Street and Newport Avenue
Q37 Kew Gardens
Union Turnpike and Kew Gardens Road
at Kew Gardens – Union Turnpike ( E   F  trains)
Park Lane South, 111th Street, 135th Avenue South Ozone Park
150th Avenue and 149th Avenue
  • Originally operated by General Omnibus Company, service began in January 1939.[26]
  • Extended from Jamaica Avenue to Kew Gardens on November 23, 1941.[45]
  • Daily service via Aqueduct Racetrack added in 2012.
Q40 Jamaica
Sutphin Boulevard and Hillside Avenue
at Sutphin Boulevard ( F  train)
Sutphin Boulevard, Lakewood Avenue, 142nd Street South Jamaica
135th Avenue and 143rd Street
Originally operated by Midland Coach, service began on February 5, 1934.[26]
Q41 Jamaica
165th Street Bus Terminal
Bay 22 and 23
127th Street, 109th Avenue, Cross Bay Boulevard Howard Beach
164th Avenue and 92nd Street
  • Originally operated by Courier Bus Company, service began on July 10, 1934.[26]
  • Extended from Guy R. Brewer Boulevard-Archer Avenue to 165th Street Terminal ca. 1989[19]
Q60 East Midtown, Manhattan
Second Avenue and 60th Street
Queensboro Bridge, Queens Boulevard, Sutphin Boulevard South Jamaica
109th Avenue and 157th Street
  • Service started on April 17, 1937 to replace Queens Boulevard Line streetcar.
  • Overnight service added in August 2007.
  • Alternate daytime and early evening buses terminate/start at Sutphin Boulevard ( E   J   Z  trains, LIRR, AirTrain)
Queens-Manhattan express
QM15 Midtown Manhattan
6th Avenue
Manhattan: 34th Street, 6th Avenue, 57th Street
Queens: Woodhaven Boulevard, Cross Bay Boulevard
Howard Beach
157th Avenue and 102nd Street
  • Lindenwood/Woodhaven-Cross Bay Express
  • No Sunday service.
  • Off-peak service ends at 157th Avenue and 92nd Street near Cross Bay Boulevard instead of 102nd Street.
  • Last dropoff is at 57th Street.
  • Service is supplemented by the BM5.
QM16 Manhattan: 34th Street, 6th Avenue, 57th Street
Queens: Cross Bay Boulevard, Rockaway Beach Boulevard
Jacob Riis Park
Parking lot
  • Rockaway Park Express
  • Now Neponsit/Rockaway Park Express
  • Service north of 157th Avenue in Howard Beach, via Lindenwood and along Woodhaven and Cross Bay Boulevards[46][47] eliminated on July 3, 2006.[48]
  • Extended from Rockaway Park to Neponsit on September 4, 2007,[49][50] then Roxbury at Fort Tilden on April 18, 2011,[49][51] before being truncated to Jacob Riis Park in December 2011 to accommodate customer parking.[52]
  • Last dropoff is at 57th Street.
QM17 Manhattan: 34th Street, 6th Avenue, 57th Street
Queens: Cross Bay Boulevard, Beach Channel Drive, Seagirt Boulevard
Far Rockaway
Far Rockaway-Mott Avenue subway station
( A  train)
  • Far Rockaway Express
  • Service north of 157th Avenue in Howard Beach, via Lindenwood and along Woodhaven and Cross Bay Boulevards[46][47] eliminated on July 3, 2006.[48]
  • Last dropoff is at 57th Street.
QM18 Manhattan: 34th Street, 6th Avenue, 57th Street
Queens: Queens Boulevard, Lefferts Boulevard, 135th Avenue
South Ozone Park
130th Street and 150th Avenue
  • South Ozone Park Express
  • Extended along 135th Avenue in spring 2008.
  • Last dropoff is at 57th Street.
QM23 Midtown Manhattan
33rd St and 7th Av
at Penn Station
Manhattan: 34th Street
Queens: Woodhaven Boulevard, Jamaica Avenue
Woodhaven
102nd Street and Jamaica Avenue
  • Brooklyn Manor Express
  • Discontinued June 27, 2010 due to budget crisis

Reorganization as Real Estate Investment Trust[edit]

Green Bus Lines, Inc. (incorporated April 8, 1925); Triboro Coach Corporation (incorporated April 21, 1931); and Jamaica-Central Railways, Inc. (incorporated March 22, 1926) were each owned by individual shareholders. Jamaica-Central Railways, Inc. had a wholly owned subsidiary, Jamaica Buses, Inc. (incorporated Apr. 24, 1931). Several subsidiary corporations were owned 40 percent by Green Bus Lines, Inc.; 40 percent by Triboro Coach Corporation; and 20 percent by Jamaica-Central Railways, Inc. These jointly owned subsidiary corporations included Command Bus Company, Inc. (incorporated October 3, 1979) and G.T.J. Co., Inc. (incorporated February 15, 1968 as Varsity Transit, Inc., and changed name on January 3, 1989 to G.T.J. Co., Inc.). Among the wholly owned subsidiaries of G.T.J. Co., Inc. was Transit Facility Management Corp. (incorporated May 18, 1998), which provided Access-A-Ride paratransit service using the name TFM Paratransit; Varsity Transit, Inc. (incorporated November 19, 1965 as Varsity Coach Corp., and changed name on January 3, 1989 to Varsity Transit, Inc.), which provided school bus service within the City of New York; and Varsity Coach Corp. (incorporated February 3, 1989), which provided school bus service outside the City of New York.

On June 23, 2006, GTJ REIT, Inc. was formed under the laws of Maryland as a real estate investment trust. Two weeks later, on July 7, 2006, three wholly owned subsidies of GTJ REIT, Inc. were formed: Green Acquisition, Inc.; Triboro Acquisition, Inc.; and Jamaica Acquisition, Inc.

A special meeting of the shareholders of Green Bus Lines, Inc.; Triboro Coach Corporation; and Jamaica-Central Railways, Inc. was held on March 26, 2007 for the purpose of obtaining the consent of a majority of the shareholders of each company to be merged into the GTJ REIT, Inc. subsidiaries. A majority of shareholders of each company voted in favor, and on March 29, 2007 Green Bus Lines, Inc. was merged into Green Acquisition, Inc.; Triboro Coach Corporation was merged into Triboro Acquisition, Inc.; and Jamaica-Central Railways, Inc. was merged into Jamaica Acquisition, Inc. Shareholders exchanged their old shares in the bus companies for new shares in GTJ REIT, Inc. Command Bus Company, Inc. and Varsity Coach Corp. were both dissolved on January 21, 2010. Jamaica Buses, Inc. was dissolved on May 13, 2010.

During 2011 and 2012, the Company underwent a process of shedding all businesses and assets that were no longer compatible with its real estate focus.

In January 2013, the Company closed on a transaction with a privately held joint venture in which the Company acquired ownership interests in a portfolio of 25 commercial properties located in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. As a result of subsequent acquisitions, the company owns 45 properties, approximately 5 million square feet and 338 acres of land.

GTJ REIT, Inc. is headquartered in West Hempstead, N.Y. Its portfolio of real estate investments includes the four garages once used for transit bus operations, all of which (Baisley Park Depot, Far Rockaway Depot's older building only. New annex owned by MTA/NYCTA, JFK Depot, and LaGuardia Depot) are leased to the City of New York for use as bus garages by MTA Bus Company.

On May 20, 2015 Mr. Jerome Cooper, the president and chairman of GTJ, REIT, Inc. died of sudden cardiac arrest (heart failure) during his sleep at his home at Long Beach, Long Island in New York, and was 86 years old. Mr. Jerome Cooper was the son of the late William Cooper who was the founder of Green Bus Lines Inc. along with his empire of other acquired bus companies that followed.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Urbitran Associates, Inc (May 2004). "NYCDOT Bus Ridership Survey and Route Analysis Final Report: Chapter 3 Transit System Characteristics" (PDF). nyc.gov. New York City Department of Transportation. Retrieved 16 October 2015. 
  2. ^ a b c d e "Analysis of Routes and Ridership of a Franchise Bus Service: Green Bus Lines" (PDF). utrc2.org/. City College of New York. October 2000. Retrieved 30 September 2015. 
  3. ^ Lueck, Thomas J. (April 23, 2005). "City to Buy Private Bus Company for Service in Three Boroughs". The New York Times. Retrieved 13 October 2015. 
  4. ^ a b c "Company Profile". Jamaica Buses, Inc. Archived from the original on 2006-01-25. Retrieved 13 October 2015. 
  5. ^ a b c "Big Bus System Started on Shoestring" (PDF). Long Island Star-Journal. Fultonhistory.com. January 17, 1955. p. 31. Retrieved 9 August 2016. 
  6. ^ a b "Green Line, Started by Jobless War Vets, Absorbed 7 Companies Under Mayor's Plan" (PDF). Long Island Daily Press. Fultonhistory.com. April 8, 1937. p. 1. Retrieved 9 August 2016. 
  7. ^ a b "Jobless Vets Started Green Bus Lines" (PDF). Long Island Daily Press. Fultonhistory.com. April 8, 1937. p. 20. Retrieved 9 August 2016. 
  8. ^ "The Green Bus Strike: It Jeopardizes Public Service" (PDF). Long Island Daily Press. Fultonhistory.com. October 24, 1939. Retrieved 9 August 2016. 
  9. ^ "Local Bus Companies of Manhattan". 17 May 2006. Archived from the original on May 17, 2006. 
  10. ^ "Bus Franchises For Queens Are Granted by City: 12-Year Old Problem Is Solved by Action of Board of Estimate". Newspapers.com. Brooklyn Daily Eagle. September 24, 1936. Retrieved 1 January 2016. 
  11. ^ "Bus Committee Tries Again To Fix Up Jamaica Zone: Report on Queens Situation Published in Fall" (PDF). Long Island Daily Press (Long Island Sunday Press) (316). Fultonhistory.com. January 12, 1936. p. 1. Retrieved 12 January 2016. 
  12. ^ "Bus Routes Changed By Zone Plan; Some Riders to be Forced to Transfer; Committee Takes Corona Line From North Shore, Gives It to Tri-Boro" (PDF). Long Island Daily Press (Long Island Sunday Press) (316). Fultonhistory.com. January 12, 1936. p. 4. Retrieved 12 January 2016. 
  13. ^ "Bus Committee's Report" (PDF). Long Island Daily Press (Long Island Sunday Press) (316). Fultonhistory.com. January 12, 1936. p. 8. Retrieved 12 January 2016. 
  14. ^ "NEW YORK CITY TRANSIT ROUTES". www.chicagorailfan.com. Retrieved 2015-12-31. 
  15. ^ "Green Bus Lines, Inc., Triboro Coach Corporation, Jamaica Central Railways, Inc.". sec.gov. GTJ Reit, Inc. February 9, 2007. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  16. ^ Roger P. Roess; Gene Sansone (23 August 2012). The Wheels That Drove New York: A History of the New York City Transit System. Springer Science & Business Media. pp. 416–417. ISBN 978-3-642-30484-2. 
  17. ^ Green Lines #951, at the Rockaway Boulevard garage in 1988, by Mel Bernero (BusTalk U.S. Surface Transportation Galleries)
  18. ^ Green Bus Lines, Inc. (accessed January 19, 2007)
  19. ^ a b c d e "Queens Merchants Win More Bus Service". nytimes.com. The New York Times. March 17, 1989. Retrieved 1 July 2015. 
  20. ^ "165th Street Mall Improvement Association Annual Report – Fiscal Year 2009" (pdf). 165th Street Mall. 165th Street Mall Improvement Association. Retrieved 16 October 2014. 
  21. ^ Lucev, Emil (June 18, 2010). "Historical Views of the Rockaways: The old Far Rockaway Station Plaza, Mott and Central Avenues, 1922". rockawave.com. The Wave. Retrieved 29 June 2015. 
  22. ^ a b c d e "Queens Bus Map" (PDF). nycityhealth.com. Metropolitan Transit Authority (New York). September 1999. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-09-16. Retrieved 6 July 2015. 
  23. ^ "NEW YORK CITY TRANSIT ROUTES" (www.chicagorailfan.com)
  24. ^ "mta.info | Planned Service Changes". 2010-04-27. Archived from the original on April 27, 2010. Retrieved 2016-01-01. 
  25. ^ "Bus Company Committee Meeting February 2010" (PDF). Metropolitan Transportation Authority. February 2010. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2010-11-25. Retrieved 9 March 2016. 
  26. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "NEW YORK CITY TRANSIT ROUTES". www.chicagorailfan.com. Retrieved 2016-01-01. 
  27. ^ "2008 Annual Report Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for the Year Ended December 31, 2008" (PDF). Metropolitan Transportation Authority. December 31, 2008. Retrieved 16 November 2015. 
  28. ^ "Upcoming 2014 Bus Service Improvements Include New Routes, Extensions: $4.9 Million in Enhancements Planned for Routes in All Five New York City Boroughs". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. August 26, 2014. Retrieved 16 November 2015. 
  29. ^ MTA Bus Company Service Advisories (Metropolitan Transportation Authority; April 2008)
  30. ^ a b "Q89 Bus Schedule" (PDF). Metropolitan Transit Authority (New York). 2008. Retrieved 30 September 2015. 
  31. ^ http://www.webcitation.org/5wlPW150v 2010 budget cut information-MTA Bus Company, archived 2011-02-25
  32. ^ a b c "Queens Bus Map: Notes" (PDF). archive.org. mta.info. December 2002. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2003-03-23. Retrieved 6 July 2015. 
  33. ^ "mta.info | Planned Service Notices: JFK Airport Terminal 4 Bus Stop Relocation". 2012-05-31. Archived from the original on May 31, 2012. Retrieved 2015-12-30. 
  34. ^ "MTA Bus Service Changes". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. June 2011. Archived from the original on 2011-06-15. Retrieved 1 January 2016. 
  35. ^ a b c "Planned Service Changes: Effective Sunday, July 1, 2012". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2012. Retrieved 31 December 2015. 
  36. ^ "Goldfeder Asks MTA For Q53 Public Input". Wave of Long Island. May 25, 2012. Retrieved 31 December 2015. 
  37. ^ Gendron, Roger (June 8, 2012). "MTA Q11 Hamilton Beach service change". Leader-Observer. Retrieved 31 December 2015. 
  38. ^ "MTA Bus Service Changes". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. December 2008. Archived from the original on 2008-12-24. Retrieved 1 January 2016. 
  39. ^ "MTA Bus Extends Q21 Route To Queens Boulevard". Wave of Long Island. September 5, 2008. Retrieved 31 December 2015. 
  40. ^ a b Rafter, Domenick (May 18, 2012). "Queens Tribune – DOT Eyes New Bus Route To Rockaways". Arverne by the Sea. Retrieved 13 October 2015. 
  41. ^ Briano, Nicholas (November 18, 2011). "MTA Creating Arverne Bus Service". Wave of Long Island. Retrieved 31 December 2015. 
  42. ^ "Planned Service Changes: Q21 Rerouted to Arverne and Introduction of Weekday Peak Period Limited-Stop Service". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Archived from the original on 2012-07-13. Retrieved 4 January 2016. 
  43. ^ Roberts, Richard (April 12, 1985). "THE BEST PLACES TO PERCH TO SEE THE BIRDS CHECK IN". The New York Times. Retrieved 16 September 2015. 
  44. ^ a b New York Times, Rockaway Bus Line Extends Service, July 3, 1937, page 17
  45. ^ "Bus Route Is Extended". The New York Times. November 19, 1941. Retrieved 1 January 2016. 
  46. ^ a b "Appendix B: Route Profiles" (PDF). nyc.gov. New York City Department of Transportation. Retrieved 8 November 2015. 
  47. ^ a b Weir, Richard (May 2, 1999). "NEIGHBORHOOD REPORT: FAR ROCKAWAY; Express Bus? Not by a Long Stretch, Riders Say". The New York Times. Retrieved 16 October 2015. 
  48. ^ a b "Fewer Stops On MTA Rockaway Express Buses". The Wave of Long Island. August 11, 2006. Archived from the original on 2015-10-16. Retrieved 16 October 2015. 
  49. ^ a b Queens Courier Staff (April 19, 2011). "NEWS BRIEFS". Queens Courier. Archived from the original on 2015-10-07. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  50. ^ Rosenberg, Miriam (August 24, 2007). "Extended Route For QM16 Bus Announced". Wave of Long Island. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  51. ^ "Bus Timetable: QM16/QM1& Spring 2011" (PDF). arvernebythesea.com. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Spring 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-10-16. Retrieved 16 October 2015. 
  52. ^ McCarthy, Ellen (December 16, 2011). "Move QM 16 Back". Wave of Long Island. Archived from the original on 2015-10-07. Retrieved 6 October 2015.