Green Lists

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Green Lists
Liste Verdi
Leader Gianni Mattioli
Founded 16 November 1986
Dissolved 9 December 1990
Merged into Federation of the Greens
Headquarters Via Salandra 6, Rome
Ideology Green politics
Political position Left-wing
European Parliament group Green Group

The Federation of Green Lists (Italian: Federazione delle Liste Verdi)[1] or Green Lists (Liste Verdi, LV) was a green political party in Italy. Its members included Gianni Mattioli, Lino De Benetti, Gianfranco Amendola, Alexander Langer, Enrico Falqui, Sauro Turroni and Alfonso Pecoraro Scanio. The Green Lists used the Smiling Sun symbol of the anti-nuclear movement, which was inherited by its successor party, the Federation of the Greens.

History[edit]

It was founded on 16 November 1986. The party was formed as a national organisation of Green Lists which had first contested regional elections in 1985, initially being joined by seventy local lists.[2] In the 1987 general election, the Green Lists received 2.5% for the Chamber, returning thirteen deputies as well as two senators in the Senate.[2]

The party took part in the 1989 European Parliamentary elections, receiving 3.8% of the vote, electing 3 MEPs.[3] A rival ecologist list, the Rainbow Greens, received 2.4% in the same election.[4]

In December 1990 the party merged with the Rainbow Greens to form the Federation of the Greens.[5]

Election results[edit]

Italian Parliament[edit]

Chamber of Deputies
Election year # of
overall votes
% of
overall vote
# of
overall seats won
+/– Leader
1987 969,218 2.5%
13 / 630
Gianni Mattioli
Senate of the Republic
Election year # of
overall votes
% of
overall vote
# of
overall seats won
+/– Leader
1987 634,182 1.9%
1 / 315
Gianni Mattioli

European Parliament[edit]

Election year # of
overall votes
% of
overall vote
# of
overall seats won
+/– Leader
1989 1,317,119 3.8%
3 / 81
Gianni Mattioli

Leadership[edit]

Spokesman:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Miranda Schreurs; Elim Papadakis (2007). The A to Z of the Green Movement. Scarecrow Press. p. 132. ISBN 978-0-8108-7041-3. 
  2. ^ a b Roberto Biorcio (2012). "Italy". In Ferdinand Muller-Rommel; Thomas Poguntke. Green Parties in National Governments (2nd edition). Routledge. p. 149. ISBN 978-1-135-28826-6. 
  3. ^ John Ely (1998). "Green Politics in Europe and the United States". In Margit Mayer; John Ely. The German Greens: Paradox Between Movement and Party. Temple University Press. p. 195. ISBN 978-1-56639-516-8. 
  4. ^ Gino Moliterno, ed. (2002). Encyclopedia of Contemporary Italian Culture. Routledge. p. 881. ISBN 978-1-134-75876-0. 
  5. ^ Roberto Biorcio (2016). "Green Parties in Southern Europe". In Emilie van Haute. Green Parties in Europe. Routledge. p. 182. ISBN 978-1-317-12454-2.