Green Lists

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Green Lists
Liste Verdi
Leader Gianni Mattioli
Founded 16 November 1986
Dissolved 9 December 1990
Merged into Federation of the Greens
Headquarters Via Salandra 6, Rome
Ideology Green politics
Political position Left-wing
European Parliament group Green Group

The Federation of Green Lists (Italian: Federazione delle Liste Verdi)[1] or Green Lists (Liste Verdi, LV) was a green political party in Italy. Its members included Gianni Mattioli, Lino De Benetti, Gianfranco Amendola, Alexander Langer, Enrico Falqui, Sauro Turroni and Alfonso Pecoraro Scanio.

History[edit]

It was founded on 16 November 1986. The party was formed as a national organisation of Green Lists which had first contested regional elections in 1985, initially being joined by seventy local lists.[2] In the 1987 general election, the Green Lists received 2.5% for the Chamber, returning thirteen deputies as well as two senators in the Senate.[2]

The party took part in the 1989 European Parliamentary elections, receiving 3.8% of the vote, electing 3 MEPs.[3] A rival ecologist list, the Rainbow Greens, received 2.4% in the same election.[4]

In December 1990 the party merged with the Rainbow Greens to form the Federation of the Greens.[5]

Election results[edit]

Italian Parliament[edit]

Chamber of Deputies
Election year # of
overall votes
 % of
overall vote
# of
overall seats won
+/–
1987 969,218 2.5%
13 / 630
Senate of the Republic
Election year # of
overall votes
 % of
overall vote
# of
overall seats won
+/–
1987 634,182 1.9%
1 / 315

European Parliament[edit]

Election year # of
overall votes
 % of
overall vote
# of
overall seats won
+/–
1989 1,317,119 3.8%
3 / 81

Leadership[edit]

Spokesman:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Miranda Schreurs; Elim Papadakis (2007). The A to Z of the Green Movement. Scarecrow Press. p. 132. ISBN 978-0-8108-7041-3. 
  2. ^ a b Roberto Biorcio (2012). "Italy". In Ferdinand Muller-Rommel; Thomas Poguntke. Green Parties in National Governments (2nd edition). Routledge. p. 149. ISBN 978-1-135-28826-6. 
  3. ^ John Ely (1998). "Green Politics in Europe and the United States". In Margit Mayer; John Ely. The German Greens: Paradox Between Movement and Party. Temple University Press. p. 195. ISBN 978-1-56639-516-8. 
  4. ^ Gino Moliterno, ed. (2002). Encyclopedia of Contemporary Italian Culture. Routledge. p. 881. ISBN 978-1-134-75876-0. 
  5. ^ Roberto Biorcio (2016). "Green Parties in Southern Europe". In Emilie van Haute. Green Parties in Europe. Routledge. p. 182. ISBN 978-1-317-12454-2.