Green Party of England and Wales election results

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

This article lists the election results of the Green Party of England and Wales (and its predecessors) in the UK parliamentary, European parliamentary, London Assembly, and Welsh Assembly elections.

Westminster elections[edit]

Summary performance[edit]

Year Candidates Total votes % of total vote Change Average vote[1] Average % vote Saved Deposits Number of MPs Change
1974 (Feb) 6 4,576 0.0% New 763 1.7% 0 0 Steady
1974 (Oct) 5 1,996 0.0% Steady 399 0.9% 0 0 Steady
1979 53 39,918 0.1% Increase0.1% 753 1.5% 0 0 Steady
1983 109 54,299 0.2% Increase0.1% 498 1.0% 0 0 Steady
1987 133 89,753 0.3% Increase0.1% 675 1.4% 0 0 Steady
1992 253 170,037 0.5% Increase0.2% 672 1.3% 0 0 Steady
1997 89 61,731 0.2% Decrease0.3% 694 1.3% 0 0 Steady
2001 145 166,477 0.6% Increase0.4% 1,148 2.8% 10 0 Steady
2005 182 257,758 1.0% Increase0.4% 1,416 3.2% 22 0 Steady
2010 310 265,247 0.9% Decrease0.1% 855 1.8% 6 1 Increase1
2015 573 1,111,603 3.6% Increase2.7% 2,018 4.3% 123 1 Steady
2017 461 512,327 1.6% Decrease2.0% 1,126 2.1% 9 1 Steady

General election 2010[edit]

The 2010 general election[2] was a milestone for the Green Party as party leader Caroline Lucas was elected Britain's first Green MP in Brighton Pavilion with 31.3% of the vote. The Green Party fielded 310 candidates, six of whom saved their deposits. Green candidates came 4th in Norwich South, Hove, Brighton Kemptown, Cambridge and Lewisham Deptford. Overall the Green party received 1.0% of votes in the General election.

General election 2015[edit]

The Green Party stood in 571 seats across the UK in the 2015 general election.[3] They held Brighton Pavilion and came second place in Bristol West, Liverpool Riverside, Manchester Gorton and Sheffield Central, with third places in 17 constituencies.[4]

It was the first time the party garnered more than one million votes in a general election.[5] Deposits were saved in 123 constituencies, where the Green candidate collected at least 5% of the votes cast.[6]

General election 2017[edit]

In the 2017 general election, Green candidates stood in 457 seats across the UK, standing down in some seats to enable tactical voting.

Deposits were saved in 8 seats: Brighton Pavilion (seat held), Isle of Wight, Buckingham, Bristol West, Sheffield Central, Skipton & Ripon, North Herefordshire and North East Hertfordshire (their sister party, the Scottish Green Party, also saved one deposit in Glasgow North). This was down from 123 saved deposits in 2015. The party lost over half its vote compared to 2015, falling from 1,156,149 votes (3.8%) to 524,604 (1.6%). The party also saw significant declines in its share of the vote in target seats, such as in Bristol West (-13.9%), Norwich South (-11%), and Sheffield Central (-7.8%). It also fell behind Labour in the Isle of Wight. In total, the Green vote fell in 561 constituencies, and rose in 22.

By-elections[edit]

The party came second in the 2008 Haltemprice and Howden by-election, although unusually Labour and the Liberal Democrats did not stand candidates.

The Richmond Green Party voted against standing in the 2016 Richmond Park by-election and to back the Liberal Democrat candidate.[7] On 3 November, the Kingston Green Party did the same, and confirmed that there would not be a Green Party candidate in the by-election.[8]

The Party stated that, as a mark of respect, they would not contest the 2016 Batley and Spen by-election.[9]

Year Constituency Candidate Votes % ± Notes
1983 Bermondsey George Hannah 45 0.2 Steady as Ecology Party
1990 Eastbourne David Aherne 553 1.2 Decrease0.4%
1993 Newbury Jim Wallis 341 0.6 Decrease0.2%
2003 Brent East Noel Lynch 638 3.1 Decrease1.6%
2007 Sedgefield Christopher Haine 348 1.2 Steady
2008 Haltemprice and Howden Shan Oakes 1,758 7.4 Steady Party placed 2nd
2011 Oldham East and Saddleworth Peter Allen 530 1.5 Steady
2011 Feltham and Heston Daniel Goldsmith 426 1.8 Increase0.7%
2012 Bradford West Dawud Islam 481 1.5 Decrease0.8%
2012 Manchester Central Tom Dylan 652 3.9 Increase1.6%
2012 Corby Jonathan Hornett 378 1.1 Steady
2012 Cardiff South and Penarth Anthony Slaughter 800 4.1 Increase2.9%
2012 Croydon North Shasha Khan 855 3.5 Increase1.5%
2014 Wythenshawe and Sale East Nigel Woodcock 748 3.1 Steady
2014 Newark David Kirwan 1,057 2.7 Steady
2014 Clacton Chris Southall 688 1.9 Increase0.7%
2014 Heywood and Middleton Abi Jackson 870 3.1 Steady
2014 Rochester and Strood Clive Gregory 1,692 4.2 Increase2.7%
2015 Oldham West and Royton Simeon Hart 249 0.9 Decrease1%
2015 Sheffield Brightside and Hillsborough Christine Gilligan Kubo 938 4.2 Decrease0.1%
2016 Tooting Esther Obiri-Darko 830 2.6 Decrease1.5%
2016 Witney Larry Sanders 1,363 3.5 Decrease1.6%
2017 Copeland Jack Lenox 515 1.7 Decrease1.3%
2017 Stoke-on-Trent Central Adam Colclough 294 1.4 Decrease2.2%
2018 Lewisham East Rosamund Adoo-Kissi-Debrah 788 3.6 Increase1.9%

European Parliament elections[edit]

Summary performance[edit]

Year Votes won % of Votes Change MEPs elected Change Note
1979 17,953 0.1 New 0 Steady as Ecology Party
1984 70,853 0.5 Increase0.4 0 Steady as Ecology Party
1989 2,299,287 14.5 Increase14.0 0 Steady as Green Party (UK). Best Green result ever.
1994 471,269 3.0 Decrease11.5 0 Steady [10]
1999 568,236 5.3 Increase2.3 2 Increase2 First two MEPs elected
2004 1,033,093 5.6 Increase0.3 2 Steady
2009 1,223,303 7.8 Increase2.2 2 Steady
2014 1,136,670 6.9 Decrease0.9 3 Increase1 First seat gain since 1999

European Parliament election 2009[edit]

In the June 2009 European Parliament election the party secured 1,223,303 votes or 7.8% of the popular vote compared to its 2004 vote share of 5.6%. Green MEPs Caroline Lucas in the South East and Jean Lambert in London were re-elected. The Greens came first in Norwich with 25%, Oxford with 26% and Brighton and Hove with 31%,[11] but it failed to gain any extra MEPs.[12][non-primary source needed]

The regional breakdown of the vote was as follows:

Constituency Candidates Votes[13] % ±%
East Midlands Sue Blount, Richard Mallender, Ashley Baxter, Matthew Follett, Barney Smith 83,939 6.8 Increase1.4
East of England Rupert Read, Peter Lynn, James Abbott, Marc Scheimann, Angela Thomson, Andrew Stringer, Amy Drayson 141,016 8.8 Increase3.2
London Jean Lambert MEP, Ute Michel, Shahrar Ali, Joseph Healy, Miranda Dunn, Shasha Khan, George Graham, Priya Shah 190,589 10.9 Increase2.5
North East England Shirley Ford, Iris Ryder, Nic Best 34,081 5.8 Increase1.0
North West England Peter Cranie, Maria Whitelegg, Ruth Bergan, Samir Chatterjee, Jill Perry, Justine Hall, Margaret Westbrook, Geoff Smith 127,133 7.7 Increase2.1
South East England Caroline Lucas MEP, Keith Taylor, Derek Wall, Miriam Kennet, Jason Kitcat, Hazel Dawe, Jonathan Essex, Matthew Ledbury, Steve Dawe, Beverley Golden 271,506 11.6 Increase3.8
South West England Ricky Knight, Roger Creagh-Osborne, Molly Scott Cato, Richard Lawson, Chloë Somers, David Taylor 144,179 9.3 Increase2.1
West Midlands Felicity Norman, Peter Tinsley, Chris Williams, Ian Davison, Vicky Dunn, Dave Wall 88,244 6.2 Increase1.1
Yorkshire and the Humber Martin Hemingway, Shan Oakes, Leslie Rowe, Kevin Warnes, Lesley Hedges, Steve Barnard 104,456 8.5 Increase2.8
Wales Jake Griffiths, Kay Roney, Ann Were, John Matthews 38,160 5.6 Increase2.0

European Parliament election 2014[edit]

In the 2014 election, the Greens gained a seat for the first time since 1999, with Molly Scott Cato being elected as MEP for South West England, where the party's vote share rose by 1.8%. However, the party's vote fell in every other region, and there was media speculation that the party had only gained a seat in the South West as a result of An Independence from Europe dividing the UK Independence Party vote.[14]

The regional breakdown of the vote was as follows:

Constituency Candidates Votes[15] % ±%
East Midlands Katharina Boettge, Sue Mallender, Richard Mallender, Peter Allen, Simon Hales 67,066 6.0 Decrease0.9
East of England Rupert Read, Mark Ereira-Guyer, Jill Mills, Ash Haynes, Marc Scheimann, Robert Lindsay, Fiona Radic 133,331 8.5 Decrease0.3
London Jean Lambert MEP, Caroline Allen, Haroon Saad, Shahrar Ali, Danny Bates, Tracey Hague, Violeta Vajda, Amelia Womack 196,419 8.9 Decrease2.0
North East England Shirley Ford, Alison Whalley, Caroline Robinson 31,605 5.2 Decrease0.6
North West England Peter Cranie, Gina Dowding, Laura Bannister, Jill Perry, John Knight, Ulrike Zeshan, Lewis Coyne, Jake Welsh 123,075 7.0 Decrease0.7
South East England Keith Taylor, Alexandra Phillips, Derek Wall, Jason Kitcat, Miriam Kennet, Beverley Golden, Jonathan Essex, Jonathan Kent, Stuart Jeffrey, Ray Cunningham 211,706 9.1 Decrease2.6
South West England Molly Scott Cato, Emily McIvor, Ricky Knight, Audaye Elesedy, Judy Maciejowska, Mark Chivers 166,447 11.1 Increase1.8
West Midlands Will Duckworth, Aldo Mussi, Vicky Duckworth, Tom Harris, Karl Macnaughton, Duncan Kerr, Laura Katherine Vesty 71,464 5.3 Decrease0.9
Yorkshire and the Humber Andrew Cooper, Shan Oakes, Dr Vicky Dunn, Denise Craghill, Martin Hemingway, Kevin Warnes 102,282 7.9 Decrease0.6
Wales Pippa Bartolotti, John Matthews, Chris Were, Rosemary Cutler 33,275 4.5 Decrease1.0

London Local elections[edit]

Date Councillors Councils Votes
Seats Change Councils Change Votes won % Votes Change
1990 0 Steady 0 Steady 141,569 5.9 Increase4.7
1994 0 Steady 0 Steady 48,798 2.2 Decrease3.7
1998 2 Increase2 0 Steady 50,732 2.9 Increase0.7
2002 1 Decrease1 0 Steady 95,394 5.5 Increase2.6
2006 12 Increase11 0 Steady 169,160 7.9 Increase2.4
2010 2 Decrease10 0 Steady 248,175 6.6 Decrease1.3
2014 4 Increase2 0 Steady 246,805 9.8 Increase3.2
2018 11 Increase7 0 Steady 210,881 8.6 Decrease1.2

London Assembly elections[edit]

Date FPTP Vote % of Vote Change List Vote % of Vote Change AMs Change
2000 162,457 10.2 N/A 183,910 11.1 N/A 3 N/A
2004 138,242 7.7 Decrease2.5 160,445 8.6 Decrease2.5 2 Decrease1
2008 194,059 8.1 Increase0.4 203,465 8.3 Decrease0.3 2 Steady
2012 188,623 8.5 Increase0.5 189,215 8.5 Increase0.1 2 Steady
2016 236,809 9.1 Increase0.5 207,959 8.0 Decrease0.6 2 Steady

London Mayoral elections[edit]

Date Candidate Popular Vote % of Vote Change Place
2000 Darren Johnson 38,121 2.2 N/A 6th
2004 Darren Johnson 57,332 3.1 Increase0.9 7th
2008 Sian Berry 77,347 3.2 Increase0.1 4th
2012 Jenny Jones 98,913 4.5 Increase1.3 3rd
2016 Sian Berry 150,673 5.8 Increase1.3 3rd

Wales Green Party election results[edit]

Welsh Assembly elections[edit]

Date FPTP Vote % of Vote Change List Vote % of Vote Change AMs Change
1999 1,002 0.1 N/A 25,858 2.5 N/A 0 N/A
2003 Decrease0.1 30,028 3.5 Increase1.0 0 Steady
2007 Steady 33,803 3.5 Steady 0 Steady
2011 1,514 0.2 Increase0.2 32,649 3.4 Decrease0.1 0 Steady
2016 25,202 2.5 Increase2.3 30,211 3.0 Decrease0.4 0 Steady

2016[edit]

In September 2015 Amelia Womack, Deputy Leader of GPEW, announced her intention to stand in the National Assembly elections for Wales Green Party. [16] Wales Green Party who create their own set of devolved policies around devolved issues in Wales were hopeful of gaining three Assembly seats from the proportional representation lists in the 2016 elections.[17] In the event, they won none, their vote share fell by 0.4%, and the party dropped to seventh place, behind the single-issue Abolish the Welsh Assembly Party. It was the party's worst result since 1999.

Region Number of Votes Proportion of Votes Change Candidates
Mid and West Wales 8,222 3.8% Decrease 0.3% Alice Hooker Stroud, Grenville Ham, Pippa Pemberton, Frances Bryant, Brian Dafydd Williams
North Wales 4,789 2.3% Steady Duncan Rees, Martin Bennewith, Petra Haig, Gerry Wolff
South Wales Central 7,949 3.4% Decrease 1.8% Amelia Womack, Anthony Slaughter, Hannah Pudner, Chris von Ruhland
South Wales East 4,831 2.5% Decrease 0.2% Pippa Bartolotti, Ann Were, Chris Were, Katy Beddoe, Andrew Creak
South Wales West 4,420 2.6% Steady Lisa Rapado, Charlotte Barlow, Laurence Brophy, Mike Whittall, Russell Kennedy, Thomas Muller

2011[edit]

The Wales Green Party again fielded candidates in all 5 top-up regions for the 2011 election. For the first time since 1999, the Greens also stood in a constituency - they once again opted to stand in Ceredigion.

During the 2011 campaign, they specifically targeted Labour voters with the aim of persuading them to use their regional list vote for the Greens, using the slogan "2nd vote Green". They claimed that Labour list votes were "wasted" and that over 70,000 votes in South Wales Central went "in the bin at every election" as Labour had never won a top-up seat in that region.[18]

On this occasion, South Wales Central was the region the party targeted. The region includes Cardiff, with its large student population, and also the constituency of Cardiff Central, the only Liberal Democrat-Labour marginal seat in Wales. Welsh Green leader and South Wales Central candidate Jake Griffiths stated they were also aiming to attract disaffected Liberal Democrat voters in the region.[19]

The Greens polled 32,649 votes, 3.4% of the total votes cast for the regional lists.[20] In South Wales Central, they took over 10,000 votes, 5.2% of the total, though they were still almost 6,000 votes away from winning a seat. The regional results were as follows:

Region Number of Votes Proportion of Votes Change Candidates
Mid and West Wales[21] 8,660 4.1% Increase 0.1% Leila Kiersch, Marilyn Elson
North Wales[22] 4,406 2.3% Decrease 0.6% Dorienne Robinson, Timothy Foster, Peter Haig
South Wales Central[23] 10,774 5.2% Increase 1.4% Jake Griffiths, Sam Coates, John Matthews, Matt Townsend, Teleri Clark
South Wales East[24] 4,857 2.7% Decrease 0.2% Chris Were, Pippa Bartolotti, Owen Clarke, Alyson Ayland, Alan Williams
South Wales West[25] 3,952 2.6% Decrease 1.2% Keith Ross, Huw Evans, Andy Chyba, Delyth Miller

In Ceredigion, Chris Simpson polled 1,514 votes, or 5.2%. He came fifth out of five candidates.[26]

2007[edit]

In 2007, the party again fielded a list of candidates in each of the top-up regions but no candidates for the constituencies. The Wales Green Party proposed that Wales should "be at the forefront of....a green industrial revolution". The party targeted South Wales West - the region where they had performed best in 2003.[27]

The Welsh Greens polled 33,803 votes, or 3.5% of the total, a slight decrease on 2003.[28] The party failed to win any seats, with their best performance this time being Mid and West Wales with 4.0% of the vote. In South Wales West their vote declined by one percentage point, their worst result of the five regions.

Region Number of Votes Proportion of Votes Change Candidates
Mid and West Wales[29] 8,768 4.0% Decrease 0.1% Leila Kiersch, Moth Foster, Marilyn Elson, John Jennings
North Wales[30] 5,660 2.9% Increase 0.4% Jim Killock, Joe Blakesley, Maredudd ap Rheinallt, Wilf Hastings
South Wales Central[31] 7,831 3.8% Increase 0.4% John Matthews, Richard Payne, David Pierce, Nigel Baker
South Wales East[32] 5,414 2.8% Decrease 0.3% Ann Were, Alasdair McGowen, Gerry Layton, Owen Clarke
South Wales West[33] 6,130 3.8% Decrease 1.0% Rhodri Griffiths, Brig Oubridge, Jane Richmond, Jonathan Spink

2003[edit]

In the 2003 election, the party again fielded a list of candidates for each of the electoral regions but this time stood no candidates for the constituencies. The Welsh Greens failed to win any seats, polling 30,028 votes, or 3.5%. Their best performance was in South Wales West where they polled 6,696 votes, or 4.8% of the total.

Region Number of Votes Proportion of Votes Change Candidates
Mid and West Wales[34] 7,794 4.2% Increase 0.7% Dorienne Robinson, Molly Scott Cato, Timothy Foster, Reg Taylor, Christopher Cato
North Wales[35] 4,200 2.4% Increase 0.2% Klaus Armstrong-Brown, John Walker, Jeremy Hart, Wilfred Hastings, Gilly Boyd, Jim Killock
South Wales Central[36] 6,047 3.3% Increase 0.9% John Matthews, Lynn Farr, Jan Tucker, Sylvia Latham, Paul Beswick
South Wales East[37] 5,291 3.1% Increase 1.1% Peter Varley, Ann Were, Owen Clarke, Ernie Hamer, Gealdine Layton, Teresa Telfer, Matthew Wooton
South Wales West[38] 6,696 4.8% Increase 2.4% Martin Shrewsbury, Jan Cliff, Rhodri Griffiths, Steve Clegg, Deborah James, Tony Young

1999[edit]

In the 1999 inaugural election for the National Assembly, the Welsh Greens stood candidates in all five electoral regions used to elect "top-up" members of the assembly. Additionally, one candidate stood for the constituency seat of Ceredigion. The party stated that they aimed to poll around 7% of the vote and win at least one top-up seat.[39]

The Welsh Greens ultimately polled 25,858 votes in the regional lists, 2.5% of the total, and 1,002 constituency votes (3.1%) in Ceredigion. No Welsh Greens were elected.[40]

Region Number of Votes Proportion of Votes Candidates
Mid and West Wales[41] 7,718 3.5% Dave Bradney, Sarah Scott-Cato, Sue Walker, Timothy Shaw, Timothy Foster
North Wales[42] 4,667 2.2% Jim Killock, Christopher Busby, Robin Welch, Klaus Armstrong-Brown, Angela Loveridge, Alexandra Plows, Kathryn Turner, Gwilym Morus, Sarah Collick
South Wales Central[43] 5,336 2.5% Kevin Jakeway, John Matthews, Vivien Turner, Chris Von Ruhland
South Wales East[44] 4,055 2.0% Roger Coghill, Kevin Williams, Steve Ainley, Elaine Ross, Owen Clarke
South Wales West[45] 4,082 2.4% Graham Oubridge, Lee Turner, Janet Evans, Simon Phillips

UK Parliament elections[edit]

2015

In the 2015 UK general election, the Wales Green Party again failed to gain any MPs, but did retain their deposits in three constituencies, having achieved 5% or more of the vote. The party stood candidates in 35 of the 40 constituencies in Wales, far exceeding previous efforts. Leader at the time, Pippa Bartolotti, declared 2015 a 'record breaking year'[46] for the party. The results for the party's candidates in Wales, in alphabetical order of constituency, were as follows:

Constituency Candidate Number of Votes Proportion of Votes Turnout
Aberavon Jonathan Tier 711 2.3% 63.3%
Aberconwy Petra Haig 727 2.4% 66.2%
Alyn and Deeside Alasdair Ibbotson 976 2.4% 66.6%
Blaenau Gwent Mark Pond 738 2.3% 61.7%
Brecon and Radnorshire Chris Carmichael 1,261 3.1% 73.8%
Bridgend Tony White 736 1.9% 65.8%
Caerphilly Katy Beddoe 937 2.3% 63.3%
Cardiff Central Chris von Ruhland 2,461 6.4% 67.3%
Cardiff North Ruth Osner 1,254 2.5% 76.1%
Cardiff South & Penarth Anthony Slaughter 1,746 3.7% 61.4%
Cardiff West Ken Barker 1,704 3.9% 65.6%
Carmarthen East and Dinefwr Ben Rice 1,091 2.8% 70.9%
Carmarthen West and South Pembrokeshire Gary Tapley 1,290 3.2% 69.8%
Ceredigion Daniel Thompson 2,088 5.6% 69.0%
Clwyd South Duncan Rees 915 2.6% 63.8%
Cynon Valley John Matthews 799 2.6% 59.3%
Delyn Kay Roney 680 1.8% 69.8%
Dwyfor Meirionnydd Marc Fothergill 981 3.4% 65.1%
Gower Julia Marshall 1,161 2.7% 69.2%
Islwyn Peter Varley 659 1.9% 63.6%
Llanelli Guy Smith 689 1.8% 64.5%
Merthyr Tydfil and Rhymney Elspeth Parris 603 1.8% 53.0%
Monmouth Christopher Were 1,629 3.4% 76.2%
Montgomeryshire Richard Chaloner 1,260 3.7% 76.2%
Neath Catrin Brock 1,185 3.2% 66.2%
Newport East David Mclean 887 2.5% 62.7%
Newport West Pippa Bartolotti 1,272 3.2% 64.9%
Ogmore Laurie Brophy 754 2.1% 63.7%
Pontypridd Katy Clay 992 2.6% 64.3%
Preseli Pembrokeshire Frances Bryant 1,452 3.6% 70.7%
Rhondda Lisa Rapado 453 1.4% 60.9%
Swansea West Ashley Wakeling 1,784 5.1% 59.8%
Torfaen Matt Cooke 746 2.0% 61.3%
Vale of Glamorgan Alan Armstrong 1,054 2.1% 71.1%
Wrexham David Munnerly 669 2.0% 64.2%
Total 35 (out of 40) 38,344
Mean 1095.5 2.9% 66.0%
2010

In the 2010 UK general election, the Wales Green Party again failed to gain any MPs. The results for the party's candidates in Wales, in alphabetical order of constituency, were as follows:

Constituency Candidate Number of Votes Proportion of Votes Turnout
Brecon and Radnorshire Dorienne Robinson 341 0.9% 72.5%
Cardiff Central Sam Coates 575 1.6% 59.1%
Cardiff North Chris von Ruhland 362 0.8% 72.7%
Cardiff South & Penarth Matthew Townsend 554 1.2% 60.2%
Cardiff West Jake Griffiths 750 1.8% 65.2%
Ceredigion Leila Kiersch 696 1.8% 64.8%
Monmouth Steve Millson 587 1.3% 72.2%
Newport West Pippa Bartolotti 450 1.1% 64.8%
Pontypridd John Matthews 361 1.0% 63.0%
Swansea East Tony Young 318 1.0% 54.6%
Swansea West Keith Ross 404 1.1% 58.0%
Torfaen Owen Clarke 438 1.2% 61.5%
Vale of Glamorgan Rhodri H. Thomas 457 0.9% 69.3%
Total 13 (out of 40) 6,293
Mean 484.1 1.2% 64.45%
2005

In the 2005 UK general election, the Wales Green Party failed to gain any MPs or retain any deposits. The results for the party's candidates in Wales, in alphabetical order of constituency, were as follows:

Constituency Candidate Number of Votes Proportion of Votes Turnout
Aberavon Miranda La Vey 510 1.7% 58.9%
Bridgend Jonathan Spink 595 1.6% 59.2%
Cardiff South & Penarth John Matthews 729 2.0% 56.2%
Ceredigion Dave Bradney 846 2.4% 67.2%
Conwy Jim Killock 512 1.5% 62.3%
Gower Rhodri Griffiths 1,029 2.6% 64.9%
Neath Susan Jay Green 658 1.8% 62.2%
Newport West Peter Varley 540 1.5% 59.3%
Preseli Pembrokeshire Molly Scott Cato 494 1.3% 69.5%
Swansea East Tony Young 493 1.6% 52.4%
Swansea West Martyn Shrewsbury 738 2.2% 57.1%
Total 11 (out of 40) 7,144
Mean 649.5 1.8% 60.8%

European Parliament elections[edit]

2014

The Wales Green Party nominated four candidates for the European Parliament election, 2014.[47]

  • Pippa Bartolotti
  • John Matthews
  • Roz Cutler
  • Christopher Were
2009

In the European Parliament election, 2009 (United Kingdom), the Welsh party failed to gain any seats in the European Parliament, but increased the vote to 5.6% for the four Welsh seats.

2004

In the 2004 elections, the Welsh party failed to gain any seats in the European Parliament (with 3.6% of the vote for the four Welsh seats) and lost their only county council seat (of Klaus Armstrong-Braun in Flintshire).

References[edit]

  1. ^ Average vote per candidate
  2. ^ "BBC NEWS – Election 2010 – UK - National". BBC News. 
  3. ^ BBC, https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/election-2015-32254036
  4. ^ Electoral Calculus, "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2015-10-17. Retrieved 2015-10-17. 
  5. ^ Peter Walker. "Greens fail to add to single seat despite highest-ever share of vote". the Guardian. Retrieved 19 November 2015. 
  6. ^ "Green Party - Greens call for Proportional Representation after winning 1,157,613 votes and just one seat". greenparty.org.uk. Retrieved 19 November 2015. 
  7. ^ https://twitter.com/jessicaelgot/status/793914600857165824
  8. ^ https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/nov/04/greens-back-lib-dem-candidate-against-zac-goldsmith-in-byelection?CMP=twt_gu
  9. ^ https://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/news/major-parties-will-not-contest-jo-cox-s-seat-1-7969733
  10. ^ "Summary results of 1994 European Parliamentary Election". demon.co.uk. Retrieved 19 November 2015. 
  11. ^ Rogers, Simon (13 June 2009). "Exactly how well did the BNP do where you live?". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 4 May 2010. 
  12. ^ "Green vote increases by 44%". greenparty.org.uk. Retrieved 19 November 2015. 
  13. ^ "European Election Results 2009, UK Results", BBC News, 19 April 2009, retrieved 5 January 2010 
  14. ^ "European Election Results 2014: An Independence From Europe Party Probably Cost Ukip One More MEP", Huffington Post, 26 May 2014, retrieved 28 August 2017 
  15. ^ "UK European election results". BBC News. 26 May 2014. 
  16. ^ "Green deputy leader wants to switch to Welsh politics". ITV News. 
  17. ^ "Election 2015: Greens call for 'peaceful revolution'". BBC News. 
  18. ^ "2nd Vote Green Launch". 
  19. ^ "Greens 'ready to win first Welsh assembly seat'". 
  20. ^ "2011 Wales-wide result". 
  21. ^ "2011 Mid & West result". 
  22. ^ "2011 North Result". 
  23. ^ "2011 South Central result". 
  24. ^ "2011 South East result". 
  25. ^ "2011 South West result". 
  26. ^ "2011 Ceredigion result". 
  27. ^ "WGP Campaign Launch". 
  28. ^ "Wales-wide result 2007". 
  29. ^ "2007 Mid & West result". 
  30. ^ "2007 North result". 
  31. ^ "2007 South Central result". 
  32. ^ "2007 South East result". 
  33. ^ "2007 South West result". 
  34. ^ "BBC NEWS - VOTE 2003". bbc.co.uk. 
  35. ^ "BBC NEWS - VOTE 2003". bbc.co.uk. 
  36. ^ "BBC NEWS - VOTE 2003". bbc.co.uk. 
  37. ^ "BBC NEWS - VOTE 2003". bbc.co.uk. 
  38. ^ "BBC NEWS - VOTE 2003". bbc.co.uk. 
  39. ^ "BBC News - News - Greens launch Welsh manifesto". bbc.co.uk. 
  40. ^ "Welsh Assembly Elections: 6 May 1999" (PDF). Retrieved 2016-08-01. 
  41. ^ "BBC News - Elections - Wales 99 - Regions - Mid and West Wales". bbc.co.uk. 
  42. ^ "BBC News - Elections - Wales 99 - Regions - North Wales". bbc.co.uk. 
  43. ^ "BBC News - Elections - Wales 99 - Regions - South Wales Central". bbc.co.uk. 
  44. ^ "BBC News - Elections - Wales 99 - Regions - South Wales East". bbc.co.uk. 
  45. ^ "BBC News - Elections - Wales 99 - Regions - South Wales West". bbc.co.uk. 
  46. ^ "Wales Green Party: 'We've broken so many records'". ITV News. 
  47. ^ "Wales Green Party - Wales Leader is Green Euro Candidate". greenparty.org.uk.