Greenwater, California

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Greenwater
Unincorporated community
Greenwater is located in California
Greenwater
Greenwater
Location in California
Greenwater is located in the US
Greenwater
Greenwater
Greenwater (the US)
Coordinates: 36°10′46″N 116°36′59″W / 36.17944°N 116.61639°W / 36.17944; -116.61639Coordinates: 36°10′46″N 116°36′59″W / 36.17944°N 116.61639°W / 36.17944; -116.61639
Country United States
State California
County Inyo County
Elevation[1] 4,288 ft (1,307 m)

Greenwater – formerly, Ramsey,[1] The Camp,[1] and Kunze [2] – was an unincorporated community near Death Valley in eastern Inyo County, California.[1] It is now a deserted ghost town.

Geography[edit]

Greenwater is located 5.5 miles (8.9 km) north of Funeral Peak in the Funeral Mountains above southeastern Death Valley,[2] at an elevation of 4288 feet (1307 m).[1] It is now located within Death Valley National Park, north of Smith Mountain, and south of the Rand, California mining district ruins.

History[edit]

Greenwater was a mining town in the Mojave Desert that saw its rise and fall within the first decade of the 20th century.[3]

The original townsite, 2 miles (3.2 km) west of the current site and called Kunze after its founder Arthur Kunze, was abandoned in favor of the current site, which was originally called Ramsey.[2] A post office operated at Greenwater from 1906 to 1908.[2]

Copper and water[edit]

Founded around a copper ore strike in 1905 the town of Greenwater was a short lived Death Valley community. So dry was its region that water had to be hauled into the town. The lucrative business of water barrel salesman fetched any entrepreneur $15 per barrel; in 1913 that equaled over $250 in 2004 dollars.[4]

Eventually the town grew to 2,000 people and became known for a local magazine, The Death Valley Chuckwalla. By 1909 the copper mining had collapsed without ever turning a profit and the residents left town for other areas. Today, there is nothing left of Greenwater.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Greenwater, California
  2. ^ a b c d Durham, David L. (1998). California's Geographic Names: A Gazetteer of Historic and Modern Names of the State. Clovis, Calif.: Word Dancer Press. p. 1168. ISBN 1-884995-14-4. 
  3. ^ http://www.nps.gov/deva/historyculture/death-valley-ghost-towns.ht . accessed 6/22/2010
  4. ^ CPI calculator 1913-2004
  5. ^ Death Valley Ghost Towns: National Park Service.

External links[edit]