Greenwich Township, Cumberland County, New Jersey

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Greenwich Township, New Jersey
Township of Greenwich
Teaburners' Monument
Teaburners' Monument
Greenwich Township highlighted in Cumberland County. Inset map: Cumberland County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Greenwich Township highlighted in Cumberland County. Inset map: Cumberland County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Greenwich Township, Cumberland County, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Greenwich Township, Cumberland County, New Jersey
Greenwich Township is located in Cumberland County, New Jersey
Greenwich Township
Greenwich Township
Location in Cumberland County
Greenwich Township is located in New Jersey
Greenwich Township
Greenwich Township
Location in New Jersey
Greenwich Township is located in the United States
Greenwich Township
Greenwich Township
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 39°23′47″N 75°22′03″W / 39.396273°N 75.367551°W / 39.396273; -75.367551Coordinates: 39°23′47″N 75°22′03″W / 39.396273°N 75.367551°W / 39.396273; -75.367551[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
CountyCumberland
EstablishedJanuary 19, 1748
IncorporatedFebruary 21, 1798
Named forGreenwich, England
Government
 • TypeTownship
 • BodyTownship Committee
 • MayorWilliam C. Reinhart (D, term ends December 31, 2019)[3][4]
 • Municipal clerkLisa Garrison[3]
Area
 • Total18.834 sq mi (48.780 km2)
 • Land17.839 sq mi (46.202 km2)
 • Water0.995 sq mi (2.578 km2)  5.29%
Area rank153rd of 566 in state
11th of 14 in county[1]
Elevation20 ft (6 m)
Population
 • Total804
 • Estimate 
(2018)[10]
765
 • Rank544th of 566 in state
13th of 14 in county[11]
 • Density45.1/sq mi (17.4/km2)
 • Density rank557th of 566 in state
13th of 14 in county[11]
Time zoneUTC−5:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
Area code(s)856 exchanges: 451, 453, 455[15]
FIPS code3401128170[1][16][17]
GNIS feature ID0882058[1][18]
Websitewww.historicgreenwichnj.org

Greenwich Township (/ˈɡrinwɪ/[19]) is a township in Cumberland County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 804,[7][8][9] reflecting a decline of 43 (-5.1%) from the 847 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 64 (-7.0%) from the 911 counted in the 1990 Census.[20] It is part of the Vineland-Millville- Bridgeton Primary Metropolitan Statistical Area for statistical purposes.

History[edit]

Greenwich Township was first formed as a precinct on January 19, 1748, and was incorporated by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798, as one of New Jersey's initial group of 104 townships. Portions of Hopewell Township and Stow Creek Township were annexed in 1845.[21] The township was named for Greenwich, England.[22][23]

In 1774, during the run-up to the American Revolutionary War, the small community on the Cohansey River was the site of the Greenwich Tea Party, in which a load of tea meant to be sent overland into Philadelphia, Pennsylvania was torched in the night.[24][25] After the Revolutionary War, the pronunciation of the town was changed to Green-witch to differentiate itself from its English namesake.[19]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 18.834 square miles (48.780 km2), including 17.839 square miles (46.202 km2) of land and 0.995 square miles (2.578 km2) of water (5.29%).[1][2]

The township borders the Cumberland County municipalities of Fairfield Township, Hopewell Township and Stow Creek Township; Lower Alloways Creek Township in Salem County and the Delaware Bay.[26]

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Bacons Neck, Bayside, Caviar, Davis Mills, Othello, Sheppards Mill, Springtown and Stathams Neck.[27]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810858
18208903.7%
18309122.5%
18409180.7%
18501,15826.1%
18601,2659.2%
18701,262−0.2%
18801,245−1.3%
18901,173−5.8%
19001,2839.4%
19101,145−10.8%
1920966−15.6%
19309791.3%
1940929−5.1%
19509664.0%
19601,08612.4%
1970963−11.3%
19809731.0%
1990911−6.4%
2000847−7.0%
2010804−5.1%
Est. 2016776[10][28]−3.5%
Population sources: 1810-2010[29][30]
1810-1920[31] 1840[32] 1850-1870[33]
1850[34] 1870[35] 1880-1890[36]
1890-1910[37] 1910-1930[38]
1930-1990[39] 2000[40][41] 2010[7]

Census 2010[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 804 people, 336 households, and 229.152 families residing in the township. The population density was 45.1 per square mile (17.4/km2). There were 369 housing units at an average density of 20.7 per square mile (8.0/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 91.42% (735) White, 3.73% (30) Black or African American, 1.24% (10) Native American, 0.50% (4) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.62% (5) from other races, and 2.49% (20) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.61% (21) of the population.[7]

There were 336 households out of which 21.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.1% were married couples living together, 6.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.8% were non-families. 26.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.39 and the average family size was 2.89.[7]

In the township, the population was spread out with 19.8% under the age of 18, 5.3% from 18 to 24, 21.3% from 25 to 44, 35.6% from 45 to 64, and 18.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 47.7 years. For every 100 females there were 101.0 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 104.1 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $55,833 (with a margin of error of +/- $17,252) and the median family income was $80,000 (+/- $16,466). Males had a median income of $55,938 (+/- $11,759) versus $55,833 (+/- $25,039) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $31,044 (+/- $4,936). About 5.3% of families and 9.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.5% of those under age 18 and 6.5% of those age 65 or over.[42]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 847 people, 326 households, and 245 families residing in the township. The population density was 46.6 people per square mile (18.0/km²). There were 361 housing units at an average density of 19.9 per square mile (7.7/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 89.96% White, 5.08% African American, 2.60% Native American, 0.24% Asian, 0.12% from other races, and 2.01% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.53% of the population.[40][41]

There were 326 households out of which 27.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.0% were married couples living together, 8.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.8% were non-families. 21.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 3.05.[40][41]

In the township the population was spread out with 22.0% under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 23.0% from 25 to 44, 33.2% from 45 to 64, and 14.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females, there were 98.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 99.1 males.[40][41]

The median income for a household in the township was $52,188, and the median income for a family was $56,111. Males had a median income of $43,214 versus $30,208 for females. The per capita income for the township was $22,233. About 6.1% of families and 8.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.7% of those under age 18 and 17.1% of those age 65 or over.[40][41]

Government[edit]

Greenwich Fire Company
Greenwich Library

Local government[edit]

Greenwich Township is governed under the Township form of government. The governing body is a three-member Township Committee, whose members are elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one seat coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[5][43] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor and another to serve as Deputy Mayor.

As of 2019, members of the Greenwich Township Committee are Mayor William C. Bill Reinhart (D, term on committee ends December 31, 2020; term as mayor ends 2019), Deputy Mayor Dan Orr (D, term on committee and as deputy mayor ends 2019) and Mark Werley (D, 2021).[3][44][45][46][47][48]

In January 2013, Dan Orr was selected by the Township Council from among three candidates offered by the Democratic municipal committee to serve the unexpired term of Bill Kiefer, who resigned from office earlier that month.[49]

In 2018, the township had an average property tax bill of $6,372, the highest in the county, compared to an average bill of $8,767 statewide.[50]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Greenwich Township is located in the 2nd Congressional District[51] and is part of New Jersey's 1st state legislative district.[8][52][53] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Greenwich Township had been in the 3rd state legislative district.[54]

For the 116th United States Congress, New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Jeff Van Drew (D, Dennis Township).[55] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2021)[56] and Bob Menendez (Paramus, term ends 2025).[57][58]

For the 2018–2019 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 1st Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Jeff Van Drew (D, Dennis Township) and in the General Assembly by Bob Andrzejczak (D, Middle Township) and R. Bruce Land (D, Vineland).[59][60]

Cumberland County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who are elected at-large in partisan elections to serve staggered three-year terms in office, with either two or three seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle. At an annual reorganization meeting held each January, the freeholders select one member to serve as Freeholder Director and another as Deputy Director.[61] As of 2018, Cumberland County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Joseph Derella Jr. (D, Millville, term as freeholder and as freeholder director ends December 31, 2018),[62] Deputy Freeholder Director Darlene R. Barber (D, Upper Deerfield Township, term as freeholder ends 2019, term as deputy freeholder director ends 2018),[63] George Castellini (D, Vineland, 2020),[64] Carol Musso (D, Deerfield Township, 2020),[65] James F. Quinn (D, Millville, 2018),[66] Joseph V. Sparacio (R, Deerfield Township, 2019)[67] and Jack Surrency (D, Bridgeton 2020).[68][69][70][71] The county's constitutional officers are Clerk Celeste Riley (D, Bridgeton, 2019),[72][73] Sheriff Robert A. Austino (D, Vineland, 2020)[74][75] and Surrogate Douglas M. Rainear (D, Upper Deerfield Township, 2018).[76][77][70]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 590 registered voters in Greenwich Township, of which 172 (29.2%) were registered as Democrats, 176 (29.8%) were registered as Republicans and 242 (41.0%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[78]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 51.5% of the vote (229 cast), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 45.6% (203 votes), and other candidates with 2.9% (13 votes), among the 449 ballots cast by the township's 620 registered voters (4 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 72.4%.[79][80] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 50.4% of the vote (227 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain, who received 48.0% (216 votes), with 450 ballots cast among the township's 605 registered voters, for a turnout of 74.4%.[81] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 50.3% of the vote (233 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry, who received around 48.4% (224 votes), with 463 ballots cast among the township's 600 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 77.2.[82]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 64.9% of the vote (237 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 34.0% (124 votes), and other candidates with 1.1% (4 votes), among the 372 ballots cast by the township's 589 registered voters (7 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 63.2%.[83][84] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 44.7% of the vote (153 ballots cast), ahead of both Democrat Jon Corzine with 43.6% (149 votes) and Independent Chris Daggett with 7.0% (24 votes), with 342 ballots cast among the township's 583 registered voters, yielding a 58.7% turnout.[85]

Education[edit]

The Greenwich Township School District serves public school students in kindergarten through eighth grade at Morris Goodwin School. As of the 2017-18 school year, the district and its one school had an enrollment of 64 students and 14.8 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 4.3:1.[86] Under the Greenwich - Stow Creek Partnership established in 2009 with the Stow Creek School District in Stow Creek Township, students from both townships attend Morris Goodwin School for grades K-4 and Stow Creek School for grades 5-8.[87]

Public school students in ninth through twelfth grades attend Cumberland Regional High School, which also serves students from Deerfield Township, Fairfield Township, Hopewell Township, Shiloh Borough, Stow Creek Township and Upper Deerfield Township.[88][89][90] As of the 2017-18 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 1,127 students and 78.5 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 14.4:1.[91]

Students are also eligible to attend Cumberland County Technology Education Center in Vineland, serving students from the entire county in its full-time technical training programs, which are offered without charge to students who are county residents.[92]

Transportation[edit]

CR 620 in Greenwich Township

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 33.15 miles (53.35 km) of roadways, of which 8.37 miles (13.47 km) were maintained by the municipality and 24.78 miles (39.88 km) by Cumberland County.[93]

No Interstate, U.S., state or significant county highways serve Greenwich Township. The only numbered routes are minor county roads such as County Route 620.

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Greenwich Township include:

References[edit]

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  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
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  8. ^ a b c Municipalities Sorted by 2011-2020 Legislative District, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed October 30, 2019.
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  13. ^ Greenwich U. S. Post Office, Historic Greenwich. Accessed October 23, 2012.
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  49. ^ Woods, Don E. "Greenwich Township gets new mayor, deputy mayor, member", South Jersey Times, January 16, 2013. Accessed September 9, 2013. "The township is back to full strength after appointing Dan Orr as the new committeeman at Tuesday's meeting. A seat on the three-person committee opened after Mayor Ted Kiefer resigned on Jan. 2.... During the same meeting, William C. Reinhart and Port were appointed as mayor and deputy mayor, respectively. Reinhart and Orr are both Democrats while Port ran as Republican last election."
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  64. ^ George Castellini, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed June 7, 2018.
  65. ^ Carol Musso, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed June 7, 2018.
  66. ^ James F. Quinn, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed June 7, 2018.
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  86. ^ District information for Greenwich Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed October 31, 2019.
  87. ^ Greenwich - Stow Creek Partnership Schools K-8, Greenwich Township. Accessed March 25, 2017. "In 2009, the Morris Goodwin School entered into a shared services agreement with neighboring Stow Creek School in Stow Creek Township to form the Greenwich-Stow Creek Partnership Schools. Public school students in grades K through 4 now attend Morris Goodwin School and students in grades 5 through 8 attend Stow Creek School."
  88. ^ Cumberland Regional School District 2015 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed June 5, 2016. "The Cumberland Regional School District, located in Western Cumberland County, provides students with a comprehensive learning environment in a nurturing and personalized setting. The district serves students in grades 9-12 who reside in the municipalities of Deerfield, Fairfield, Greenwich & Stow Creek, Hopewell & Shiloh, and Upper Deerfield."
  89. ^ Shott, Meghan. "Cumberland Regional High School", South Jersey magazine. Accessed June 5, 2016. "Cumberland Regional High School, located in the northwest part of Cumberland County, serves students from Deerfield Township, Fairfield Township, Greenwich Township, Hopewell Township, Shiloh Borough, Stow Creek Township and Upper Deerfield Township."
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  93. ^ Cumberland County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  94. ^ Fea, John. The Way of Improvement Leads Home: Philip Vickers Fithian and the Rural Enlightenment in Early America, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008. Accessed April 29, 2015. "On the morning of Friday, July 16, 1773, Philip Vickers Fithian awoke early and traveled from his Greenwich, New Jersey, house across the Cohansey River to Fairfield."
  95. ^ Robert Patterson (1743-1824), University of Pennsylvania Archives & Records Center. Accessed April 29, 2015.
  96. ^ Guide to the Roland R. Renne Gubernatorial Campaign Papers 1963-1966, NWDA. Accessed April 29, 2015. "Roland Roger Renne was born on December 12, 1905 in Greenwich, New Jersey, the third of five children. Renne grew up helping his father farm and attended country schools."

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