Greg Dyer

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Greg Dyer
Personal information
Full name Gregory Charles Dyer
Born 16 March 1959
Parramatta, New South Wales, Australia
Batting style Right-handed
Role Wicket-keeper
International information
National side
Test debut (cap 339) 12 Dec 1986 v England
Last Test 12 Feb 1988 v Sri Lanka
ODI debut (cap 94) 24 Sep 1986 v India
Last ODI 4 Feb 1988 v England
Domestic team information
Years Team
1983–1989 New South Wales
Career statistics
Competition Test ODI FC LA
Matches 6 23 51 45
Runs scored 131 174 1671 408
Batting average 21.83 15.81 28.81 20.40
100s/50s 0/1 0/0 1/10 0/1
Top score 60 45* 106 52*
Catches/stumpings 22/2 24/4 123/18 39/9
Source: CricketArchive, 14 January 2013

Gregory Charles Dyer (born 16 March 1959) is a former New South Wales and Australian wicketkeeper. Dyer played in six Tests and 23 ODIs from 1986 to 1988, including playing in the victorious 1987 World Cup Final. He toured India in 1986 as a back-up keeper.

Dyer replaced Tim Zoehrer for only a few Tests as his international career was cut short by the emergence of Ian Healy, along with a controversial incident in a Test match against New Zealand in 1987-88. Dyer claimed to have "caught" New Zealand batsman Andrew Jones who was duly given out, although television replays showed the ball had touched the ground before being caught by Dyer.[1] He was subsequently dropped from the team two matches later and retired from first-class cricket shortly thereafter.[2]

He shares an Australian One Day International 7th-wicket partnership record with Steve Waugh.

In 2011, Dyer became the president of the Australian Cricketers Association.[3][4][5]

Career[edit]

Dyer played for NSW and Australian Under 19 sides, and for NSW colts.[6] He became New South Wales' preferred back up keeper for Steve Rixon when Rixon was injured or was busy on international duty. Notably, Dyer played several games in 1984-85 when NSW won the Sheffield Shield.[7]

When Rixon signed to tour in South Africa, Dyer became New South Wales' first choice wicketkeeper. He was a crucial part of the side which won the Shield again in 1985-86.

1986 Tour of India[edit]

Australia's wicketkeeper over the 1985-86 summer was Wayne Phillips, but his form dropped away and Tim Zoehrer was appointed in his place. Dyer was unofficially announced next in line when selected as a reserve keeper on the 1986 tour to India.[8]

Dyer performed strongly in tour games but Zoehrer was first choice keeper for the three test matches.[9]

He played in some one day games, taking part in a 102 run stand off 76 balls with Steve Waugh.[10] He also scored a century against Delhi in a tour game.[11]

1986-87 Test Debut[edit]

Dyer made his test debut during the third test of the 1986-87 Ashes when Zoehrer was injured.[12] Dyer broke his nose during the game but kept playing.[13]

Zoehrer's aggressive on field behaviour was causing media controversy and Dyer was increasingly spoken of as a more viable option.[14] After the 1987 tour to Sharjah, Zoehrer was omitted from the squad to tour India for the World Cup; he was replaced by Dyer.[15]

1987 World Cup[edit]

Dyer was a key part of the Australian team which won the 1987 World Cup.[16]

Following this triumph, Dyer was appointed captain of NSW for the 1987-88 season.[17]

1987-88 Summer[edit]

Dyer began the 1987-88 summer as Australia's first choice keeper.

Catching Controversy[edit]

In 1987-88 Dyer was playing for Australia when he claimed a catch off Andrew Jones from the bowling of Craig McDermott. TV replays showed that Dyer had fumbled the ball.[18]

"Dyer has to live with his conscience for the rest of his life — no way can I blame the umpires," said New Zealand's cricket manager.[19]

Dyer later made a statement saying:

I have not commented earlier because I was in

the middle of a Test match and was trying to concentrate on it and also because I, and the Australian team management, felt it would have been inappropriate to comment on umpiring decisions... Given that the ball initially hit my left glove and ended in my right glove, I made a gesture of query to the umpires. However, I honestly believed at the time of the incident, as did my captain and my teammates, that the ball had not touched the ground. One angle of slow motion TV replay apparently indicates that the ball had in fact touched the ground. In the circumstances I can understand Andrew Jones being upset, but I would like Andrew, along

with all other interested parties, to know that I acted in good faith.[20]

Alan Border said, "I had no doubt whatsoever it was taken and I got a shock later when I saw the replays. Greg was very upset."[20]

Dropped from Australian Team[edit]

New South Wales finished third at the end of the season. In March 1988, Dyer was dropped from the Australian side to tour Pakistan that winter in favour of Ian Healy.[21]

He was reappointed captain of NSW for the 1988-89 summer.[22] He was sacked mid season, replaced as wicketkeeper by Phil Emery and as captain by Geoff Lawson.[23][24]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Grant, Trevor (28 Dec 1987), Row breaks out over Dyer's catch that wasn't, The Age, retrieved 31 Jan 2015 
  2. ^ "Greg Dyer: World Cup winner whose career ended following a fraudulent claim". Retrieved 2016-07-23. 
  3. ^ "Dyer takes over as ACA president". Retrieved 2016-07-23. 
  4. ^ "'Miss this opportunity and it'll put cricket back five years'". Retrieved 2016-07-23. 
  5. ^ Hanlon, Peter (2015-12-25). "How Greg Dyer did himself out of a job with the ICC". The Age. Retrieved 2016-07-23. 
  6. ^ "Rain ends NSW's chance". The Canberra Times 55, (16,531) (Australian Capital Territory, Australia). 30 December 1980. p. 14. Retrieved 6 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia. 
  7. ^ "Injuries dog Test players". The Canberra Times 59, (18,062) (Australian Capital Territory, Australia). 12 March 1985. p. 22. Retrieved 6 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia. 
  8. ^ "Phillips discarded as selectors go for a 'keeper". The Canberra Times 60, (18,474) (Australian Capital Territory, Australia). 1 May 1986. p. 30. Retrieved 6 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia. 
  9. ^ "Test selectors play a waiting game". The Canberra Times 61, (18,614) (Australian Capital Territory, Australia). 18 September 1986. p. 22. Retrieved 6 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia. 
  10. ^ "Wiley Indians one-day masters". The Canberra Times 61, (18,629) (Australian Capital Territory, Australia). 3 October 1986. p. 24. Retrieved 6 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia. 
  11. ^ "Dyer and Gilbert hit centuries". The Canberra Times 61, (18,639) (Australian Capital Territory, Australia). 13 October 1986. p. 21. Retrieved 6 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia. 
  12. ^ "Spinner set to carry Test drinks". The Canberra Times 61, (18,698) (Australian Capital Territory, Australia). 12 December 1986. p. 24. Retrieved 6 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia. 
  13. ^ "Dyer plays on with reset broken nose". The Canberra Times 61, (18,703) (Australian Capital Territory, Australia). 17 December 1986. p. 42. Retrieved 6 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia. 
  14. ^ "Zoehrer defended by Border". The Canberra Times 61, (18,749) (Australian Capital Territory, Australia). 2 February 1987. p. 18. Retrieved 6 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia. 
  15. ^ "Times Sport". The Canberra Times 61, (18,880) (Australian Capital Territory, Australia). 13 June 1987. p. 9 (TIMES JOBS). Retrieved 6 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia. 
  16. ^ "Border makes plans to quit". The Canberra Times 62, (19,029) (Australian Capital Territory, Australia). 10 November 1987. p. 20. Retrieved 6 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia. 
  17. ^ "TIMES Sport Pakistan blazes way to semis". The Canberra Times 62, (19,009) (Australian Capital Territory, Australia). 21 October 1987. p. 42. Retrieved 6 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia. 
  18. ^ "Sunday Sport McDERIMOTT TO RESCUE". The Canberra Times 62, (19,075) (Australian Capital Territory, Australia). 27 December 1987. p. 6 (Sunday Sport). Retrieved 6 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia. 
  19. ^ "War of words rages on over disputed catch". The Canberra Times 62, (19,076) (Australian Capital Territory, Australia). 28 December 1987. p. 1. Retrieved 6 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia. 
  20. ^ a b "TIMES Sport Tail does Border proud". The Canberra Times 62, (19,079) (Australian Capital Territory, Australia). 31 December 1987. p. 18. Retrieved 6 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia. 
  21. ^ "Dyer dropped from tour squad". The Canberra Times 62, (19,171) (Australian Capital Territory, Australia). 1 April 1988. p. 20. Retrieved 6 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia. 
  22. ^ "Dyer reappointed to NSW captaincy". The Canberra Times 62, (19,245) (Australian Capital Territory, Australia). 15 June 1988. p. 48. Retrieved 6 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia. 
  23. ^ "Dyer dropped from Shield team". The Canberra Times 63, (19,461) (Australian Capital Territory, Australia). 18 January 1989. p. 48. Retrieved 6 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia. 
  24. ^ "India splits over board's decision on six players". The Canberra Times 63, (19,663) (Australian Capital Territory, Australia). 9 August 1989. p. 38. Retrieved 6 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia. 

External links[edit]