Greg Hughes

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Greg Hughes
Speaker of the Utah House of Representatives
Assumed office
January 26, 2015
Preceded by Becky Lockhart
Member of the Utah House of Representatives
from the 51st district
Assumed office
January 1, 2003
Preceded by John Swallow
Personal details
Born Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
Political party Republican
Education Utah Valley University
Brigham Young University

Gregory H. Hughes[1] is an American politician and a Republican member of the Utah House of Representatives representing District 51 since January 1, 2003. Greg Hughes currently serves as the Speaker of the House for the Utah House of Representatives in the state of Utah.[2] He has announced that he will not be seeking reelection as Speaker of the House or as a representative in 2018. [3]

Early life and career[edit]

Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Hughes never knew his father and was brought up by a single mother who sold cemetery plots on commission. She joined the LDS Church and married when Hughes was five, but that marriage ended in divorce by the time he was ten. At age 16, Hughes was in a car accident with friends, and was subsequently confined to a wheelchair for a year. He later worked as a bellman in an upscale Pittsburgh hotel and then on the 1988 presidential campaign staff for George Herbert Walker Bush. He served a full-time mission for the LDS Church in Australia and Papua New Guinea.[4]

Hughes attended Utah Valley State College (now Utah Valley University) and Brigham Young University.[5] He and his wife, Krista, live in Draper, Utah with their three kids.[6] Hughes is a self-employed property manager and developer.[7]

Political career[edit]

  • 2015 Hughes went against the stated position of the Utah Chamber of Commerce, the Utah Hospital Association, the Utah Catholic Bishop, and others to oppose Republican Governor Gary Herbert's Healthy Utah plan which was passed by the Utah State Senate.[8][9]
  • 2014 Hughes defeated Sione Tavake in the 2014 Republican convention and won the November 4, 2014 General election with 4,742 votes (65.4%) against Democratic nominee Kyle Waters.[10]
  • 2012 Hughes was unopposed for the June 26, 2012 Republican primary and won the November 6, 2012 General election with 9,270 votes (69.5%) against Democratic nominee Sonja Jorgensen.[11]
  • 2010 Hughes was unopposed for the June 22, 2010 Republican primary and won the November 2, 2010 general election with 8,200 votes (68.5%) against Democratic nominee Paul Recanzone.[12]
  • 2008 Hughes was challenged in the Republican primary by Margaret Bird but won at the Republican convention for the November 4, 2008 general election, and 2006 Democratic opponent Lisa Johnson was unopposed in the Democratic primary, setting up a rematch; Hughes won with 8,394 votes (51.6%) against Johnson.[13]
  • 2006 Hughes was unopposed for the 2006 Republican primary and won the three-way November 7, 2006 general election with 5,480 votes (60.8%) against Democratic nominee Lisa Johnson and returning 2004 Constitution opponent Michael Richards.[14]
  • 2004 Hughes was unopposed for the June 22, 2004 Republican primary and won the three-way November 2, 2004 general election with 10,200 votes (68.8%) against Democratic nominee Matthew Wilber and Constitution candidate Michael Richards.[15]
  • 2002 When District 51 Republican Representative John Swallow ran for Congress and left the seat open, Hughes ran in the June 25, 2002 Republican primary and won with 1,047 votes (53%)[16] and was unopposed for the November 5, 2002 general election, winning with 7,224 votes.[17]

Since 2010, Hughes has served in House Leadership and he currently serves as the House Speaker in the Utah House of Representatives.[6] During the 2016 legislative sessions, Hughes served on the Executive Appropriations Committee, the House Legislative Expense Oversight Committee, the Legislative Audit Subcommittee, and the Legislative Management Committee.[18] During the interim, Hughes serves on the Education Interim Committee.[19]

2016 sponsored legislation[edit]

Bill Number Bill Name Bill Status
HJR012 Joint Resolution Reappointing Legislative Auditor General House/ to Lieutenant Governor for filing - 3/3/2016

Hughes also floor sponsored SCR013 Concurrent Resolution Honoring Randy Horiuchi, SCR017 Concurrent Resolution Recognizing Utah's Ten Year Relationship with Liaoning, China.[20]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Gregory Hughes' Biography". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved February 6, 2014.
  2. ^ "Gregory H. Hughes". Salt Lake City, Utah: Utah House of Representatives. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  3. ^ "House Speaker Greg Hughes won't seek re-election, but says he's no 'lame duck'". Salt Lake City, Utah: Salt Lake Tribune. Retrieved March 10, 2018.
  4. ^ . Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret News http://www.deseretnews.com/article/705313597/Tough-Pittsburgh-kid-Hughes-still-standing-in-the-Utah-ring.html?pg=all. Retrieved December 19, 2016. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  5. ^ "Gregory H. Hughes". Salt Lake City, Utah: Utah House of Representatives. Retrieved April 5, 2014.
  6. ^ a b "About". Salt Lake City, Utah: Re-Elect Greg Hughes. Retrieved April 5, 2016.
  7. ^ "Conflict of Interest" (PDF). Salt Lake City, Utah: Utah House of Representatives. Retrieved April 5, 2014.
  8. ^ moulton, kristen. "house leader on medicaid expansion 'we're done'". media news group. Retrieved 26 February 2015.
  9. ^ riley, lisa; romboy, dennis. "Hughes: Healthy Utah plan won't be heard in House". The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Retrieved 26 February 2015.
  10. ^ "2014 General election results". Ballotpedia. Retrieved April 11, 2016.
  11. ^ "2012 General Canvass Report". Salt Lake City, Utah: Lieutenant Governor of Utah. Retrieved February 6, 2014.
  12. ^ "2010 General Election Results". Salt Lake City, Utah: Lieutenant Governor of Utah. Retrieved February 6, 2014.
  13. ^ "2008 General Election Results". Salt Lake City, Utah: Lieutenant Governor of Utah. Retrieved February 6, 2014.
  14. ^ "2006 General Election Results" (PDF). Salt Lake City, Utah: Lieutenant Governor of Utah. p. 15. Retrieved February 6, 2014.
  15. ^ "2004 General Election Results" (PDF). Salt Lake City, Utah: Lieutenant Governor of Utah. p. 21. Retrieved February 6, 2014.
  16. ^ "Official Results State of Utah Primary Election June 25, 2002" (PDF). Salt Lake City, Utah: Lieutenant Governor of Utah. p. 5. Retrieved February 6, 2014.
  17. ^ "2002 General Election Results" (PDF). Salt Lake City, Utah: Lieutenant Governor of Utah. p. 22. Retrieved February 6, 2014.
  18. ^ "House Standing Committees (2017-2018)". le.utah.gov. Retrieved 2017-03-07.
  19. ^ "Greg Hughes". Salt Lake City, Utah: Utah House of Representatives. Retrieved April 11, 2016.
  20. ^ "2016 Legislation". Utah State Legislature. Retrieved April 11, 2016.

External links[edit]