Greg Laden

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Greg Laden
Native name Gregory Thomas Laden
Born 1958 (age 59–60)
Education University of the State of New York Regents College, Harvard University
Spouse(s) Amanda
Children 2 (one son, one daughter)[1]
Scientific career
Fields Biological anthropology
Institutions University of Minnesota
Thesis Ethnoarchaeology and land use ecology of the Efe (Pygmies) of the Ituri Rain Forest, Zaire: a behavioral ecological study of land use patterns and foraging behavior (1992)
Doctoral advisor Irven DeVore

Gregory Thomas Laden is an American biological anthropologist and science blogger.

Education[edit]

Born in 1958, Laden received his B.A. from the University of the State of New York's Regents College program in 1984, and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1987 and 1992, respectively, where he was advised by Irven DeVore.[2][3]

Career[edit]

Laden has taught at multiple institutions, including, but not limited to, Harvard, the University of Minnesota, and Century College.[4] In 1999, when he was on the faculty of the University of Minnesota, he co-authored a study in Current Anthropology that found that the practice of humans cooking food evolved because it allowed them to cook vegetables.[2][5] He published a blog, "Greg Laden's Blog", on ScienceBlogs,[1] where he focused on public controversies regarding multiple scientific topics, including global warming[6] and evolution.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Greg Laden". ScienceBlogs. Retrieved 10 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Wrangham, Richard; Jones, James; Laden, Greg; Pilbeam, David; Conklin-Brittain, NancyLou (December 1999). "The Raw and the Stolen. Cooking and the Ecology of Human Origins" (PDF). Current Anthropology. 40 (5): 567–594. doi:10.1086/300083. ISSN 0011-3204. PMID 10539941. 
  3. ^ Zhang, Zara (29 September 2014). "Pioneering Anthropologist, Prolific Teacher, Dies". The Harvard Crimson. Retrieved 10 April 2016. 
  4. ^ "Greg Laden". Slate. Retrieved 10 April 2016. 
  5. ^ Reuters (12 August 1999). "Better health in early man linked to fire and veggies". Deseret News. Retrieved 10 April 2016. 
  6. ^ Rosenberg, Paul (13 October 2015). "Wrong, wrong, wrong: The anti-science bullsh*t which explains why the right gets away with lies — and why the mainstream media lets them". Salon. Retrieved 10 April 2016. 
  7. ^ Chowdhury, Sudesnha (3 February 2014). "Bill Nye vs. Ken Ham: Should scientists bother debating creationists?". Christian Science Monitor. Retrieved 10 April 2016.