Greg Stolze

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Greg Stolze (born 1970) is an American game designer, writer and novelist, whose work has mainly focused on writing for role-playing games and related intellectual properties.

Career[edit]

Stolze began his career writing role playing games professionally when he was chosen by Jonathan Tweet to write for the Everway storytelling game; the Spherewalker Sourcebook was Stolze's first full-length RPG book. Subsequently he was commissioned to write the original Usagi Yojimbo RPG.

Stolze had met John Scott Tynes when they collaborated with Robin Laws to write Wildest Dreams (1993) , a supplement for Tweet's Over the Edge.[1]:255 Stolze and Tynes later co-designed the roleplaying game Unknown Armies; Stolze helped write the mechanics for the game, based on a setting Tynes had been developing for a few years.[1]:255 Although Atlas Games expressed interest in Unknown Armies, Tynes decided to go with Archon Games, but Tynes and Stolze learned that founder Lisa Manns was shutting down Archon and she returned the rights to them; they sought a new publisher, and Atlas Games ultimately published the game in January 1999.[1]:255 Stolze then became the line editor for the role-playing game Feng Shui.[1]:257

Meanwhile, Stolze and Dennis Detwiller prepared their game Godlike for publication by Pagan Publishing; as Pagan was winding down, Detwiller took it to his friends Hsin Chen and Aron Anderson, who created the company Hawthorn Hobgoblynn Press (later known as Eos Press) in 2001 to publish the game.[1]:249 Godlike uses his One-Roll Engine (ORE) dice system; in 2003 he withdrew EOS's license to use ORE.[1]:249 Detwiller formed Arc Dream Publishing in 2002 to produce supplements for Godlike, and in 2003 Arc Dream acquired the licensing from Stolze to use ORE.[1]:250 Meanwhile, Stolze wrote novels and contributed to role-playing game books for White Wolf Game Studio[2] including Demon: the Fallen and Vampire: The Requiem. Stolze also created the traditional strategy board game Elemental for Kenzer & Company.[3]

For Arc Dream, Stolze co-authored Wild Talents (2006), the "sequel" to Godlike, with Detwiller, Kenneth Hite and Shane Ivey, and also wrote alternate settings for the game such as eCollapse. Arc Dream also published a print edition of Reign Enchiridion, a stripped-down version of his Reign fantasy RPG which featured an innovative group resolution mechanic built on the ORE rules.[1]:250 He later incorporate similar rules in the Progenitor setting for Wild Talents.

Some of Stolze's recent work has been self-published using the "ransom method", whereby the game is only released when enough potential buyers have contributed enough money to reach a threshold set by the author.[4] For example, Stolze released the wargame Meatbot Massacre[3] after its ransom goal was met. Stolze has also co-written the free game NEMESIS, which juxtaposes the One-Roll Engine presented in Godlike with the Madness Meter derived from Unknown Armies.[5] Stolze has also produced small, independent role-playing games such as Executive Decision and ...in Spaaace!.,[3] and subsequently released Dinosaurs ... in SPAAACE (using the same Token Effort system), after a successful Kickstarter campaign. More recently, Arc Dream published the ORE RPG Better Angels (role-playing game), where each player plays one character, while also taking the role of the demon who grants another player character's superpowers.

Author credits[edit]

Novels[edit]

  • Ashes and Angel Wings (2003)
  • The Seven Deadlies (2003)
  • The Wreckage of Paradise (2003)
  • A Hunger Like Fire (2004)
  • The Marriage of Virtue and Viciousness (2005)
  • Godwalker (2005)
  • Switchflipped (2011)
  • Mask of the Other (2011)
  • Sinner (2013)
  • The Forgotten Monk (2015)

Role-playing games[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Shannon Appelcline (2011). Designers & Dragons. Mongoose Publishing. ISBN 978-1-907702-58-7. 
  2. ^ "My New World of Darkness Material". Greg Stolze. Retrieved August 11, 2006. 
  3. ^ a b c Stolze, Greg (2007). "Button Men". In Lowder, James. Hobby Games: The 100 Best. Green Ronin Publishing. pp. 38–41. ISBN 978-1-932442-96-0. 
  4. ^ "Games". Greg Stolze. Retrieved August 11, 2006. 
  5. ^ "NEMESIS – Roleplaying in Worlds of Horror" (pdf). Dennis Detwiller and Greg Stolze. Retrieved August 11, 2006. 

External links[edit]