Gregory G. Katsas

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Gregory G. Katsas
Greg Katsas.jpg
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit
Assumed office
December 8, 2017
Appointed byDonald Trump
Preceded byJanice Rogers Brown
Deputy White House Counsel
In office
January 20, 2017 – December 8, 2017
PresidentDonald Trump
United States Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Division
In office
July 2008 – January 20, 2009
PresidentGeorge W. Bush
Preceded byPeter Keisler
Succeeded byTony West
United States Associate Attorney General
Acting
In office
June 22, 2007 – April 2008
PresidentGeorge W. Bush
Preceded byWilliam W. Mercer (Acting)
Succeeded byKevin J. O'Connor
Personal details
Born
Gregory George Katsas

(1964-08-06) August 6, 1964 (age 54)
Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.
Political partyRepublican
Spouse(s)Simone
EducationPrinceton University (AB)
Harvard Law School (JD)

Gregory George Katsas (born August 6, 1964) is a United States Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.[1]

Biography[edit]

Katsas as Acting Associate Attorney General

Katsas was born in 1964 in Boston to Greek immigrant parents.[2] He earned his Bachelor of Arts, cum laude, from Princeton University and his Juris Doctor, cum laude, from Harvard Law School, where he was an editor of the Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy[3] and an executive editor of the Harvard Law Review.[4][5]

Early in his career, he served as a law clerk to Justice Clarence Thomas, both at the District of Columbia Circuit and the United States Supreme Court, and to Judge Edward Roy Becker of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit.[6][5] From 2001 to 2009, he served in many senior positions in the United States Department of Justice, including Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Division and Acting Associate Attorney General.[5]

Prior to joining the White House Counsel's Office, he was a partner at Jones Day, where he specialized in civil and appellate litigation.[7] He has argued more than 75 appeals, including three cases in the U.S. Supreme Court. [5]

Federal judicial service[edit]

On September 7, 2017, President Trump nominated Katsas to serve as a United States Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, to the seat vacated by Judge Janice Rogers Brown, who retired on August 31, 2017.[8][9] On October 17, 2017, a hearing on his nomination was held before the Senate Judiciary Committee.[10] On November 9, 2017, his nomination was reported out of committee by an 11–9 roll call vote.[11][12] On November 27, 2017, the United States Senate voted to invoke cloture by a vote of 52–48.[13] On November 28, 2017, the Senate voted to confirm Katsas by a vote of 50–48.[14] He received his judicial commission on December 8, 2017.

In 2017, Katsas recused himself from matters regarding the Mueller's probe on which he personally worked, but said he would consider the facts of a case before making a decision.[15]

Memberships[edit]

He has been a member of the Federalist Society since 1989.[16]

Awards[edit]

In 2009, he was awarded the Edmund Randolph award for outstanding service, the highest award bestowed by the United States Department of Justice.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Karuppur, Abhiram (March 7, 2017). "Katsas '86 named Deputy Counsel and Deputy Assistant to President Trump". Daily Princetonian. Retrieved November 18, 2017.
  2. ^ Profile of Gregory Katsas. VettingRoom.com. Retrieved November 17, 2017.
  3. ^ "About". Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy. Retrieved April 3, 2018.
  4. ^ United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary: Questionnaire for Judicial Nominees: Gregory George Katsas
  5. ^ a b c d e "President Donald J. Trump Announces Seventh Wave of Judicial Candidates". whitehouse.gov. September 7, 2017. Retrieved September 8, 2017. This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  6. ^ Severino, Carrie (September 7, 2017). "Who is Gregory Katsas?". National Review. Retrieved November 18, 2017.
  7. ^ "Gregory Katsas to rejoin Jones Day". Jones Day. October 2009. Retrieved November 18, 2017.
  8. ^ "Eight Nominations Sent to the Senate Today". whitehouse.gov. September 7, 2017. Retrieved September 8, 2017.
  9. ^ Marimow, Ann E. (September 7, 2017). "Trump taps White House legal adviser to serve on high-profile D.C. Circuit". Washington Post. Retrieved November 18, 2017.
  10. ^ United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary: Nominations for October 17, 2017
  11. ^ Results of Executive Business Meeting – November 9, 2017, Senate Judiciary Committee
  12. ^ Schneier, Cogan (November 7, 2017). "More Than 200 Civil Rights Groups Oppose DC Circuit Nominee Greg Katsas". Law.com. Retrieved November 18, 2017.
  13. ^ U.S. Senate Roll Call Votes 115th Congress - 1st Session United States Senate Vote Summary: Vote Number 282, United States Senate, November 27, 2017
  14. ^ U.S. Senate Roll Call Votes 115th Congress - 1st Session United States Senate Vote Summary: Vote Number 283, United States Senate, November 28, 2017
  15. ^ Allan Smith (October 18, 2017). "One of Trump's top judicial nominees got grilled on Capitol Hill over his involvement with Mueller's Russia probe". BusinessInsider.com. Retrieved December 17, 2018.
  16. ^ "Questionnaire for Judicial Nominees" (PDF). judiciary.senate.gov. Retrieved June 30, 2018.

External links[edit]

Legal offices
Preceded by
William W. Mercer
Acting
United States Associate Attorney General
Acting

2007–2008
Succeeded by
Kevin J. O'Connor
Preceded by
Peter Keisler
United States Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Division
2008–2009
Succeeded by
Tony West
Preceded by
Janice Rogers Brown
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit
2017–present
Incumbent