Gregory Lavelle

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Gregory Lavelle
Member of the Delaware Senate
from the 4th district
In office
January 8, 2013 – January 8, 2019
Preceded byMichael Katz
Succeeded byLaura Sturgeon
Minority Leader of the Delaware House of Representatives
In office
January 12, 2011 – January 8, 2013
Preceded byRichard C. Cathcart
Succeeded byDaniel Short
Member of the Delaware House of Representatives
from the 11th district
In office
January 9, 2001 – January 8, 2013
Preceded byCatherine Cloutier
Succeeded byJeffrey Spiegelman
Personal details
Born (1963-09-17) September 17, 1963 (age 56)
Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.
Political partyRepublican
Alma materUniversity of Delaware
University of Pennsylvania
WebsiteOfficial website

Gregory F. Lavelle is an American politician.[1] He was a Republican member of the Delaware General Assembly from 2001 to 2019, serving in both the Delaware Senate and the Delaware House of Representatives.[2] In the 2018 midterm elections, he lost his seat in the general election to Democrat Laura Sturgeon.

Lavelle was elected to the Delaware House of Representatives in 2000 to replace Republican Catherine Cloutier, who had won a seat in the Delaware Senate. He served as the minority leader in the House from 2011 to 2013, during which time he was a leading opponent to marriage equality in Delaware.[3][4]

In 2012, Lavelle resigned his House seat to challenge incumbent Democrat Michael Katz in the Senate, which he won in a three-way general election. He served as the minority whip when he was ousted from his seat in 2018 in a major upset that was one of several losses for prominent Republicans in Delaware.[5][6] His loss came after a contentious election where Lavelle and the Democratic Party of Delaware traded accusations of misconduct and campaign violations.[7]

Lavelle earned his BS in business administration from the University of Delaware and his MS in government administration from the University of Pennsylvania.

Electoral history[edit]

  • In 2000, Lavelle won the three-way Republican primary for the House District 11 seat with 1,132 votes (50.7%).[8] He went on to win the general election with 6,090 votes (64.3%) against Democratic nominee Steven Biener.[9]
  • In 2002, Lavelle won the general election with 4,961 votes (65.7%) against Democratic nominee Michael Paul.[10]
  • In 2004, Lavelle was unopposed in the general election, winning 7,702 votes.[11]
  • In 2006, Lavelle won the general election with 4,635 votes (58.0%) against Democratic nominee Eric Levin.[12]
  • In 2008, Lavelle won the general election with 6,731 votes (63.3%) against Democratic nominee Charles Old.[13]
  • In 2010, Lavelle won the general election with 5,198 votes (61.0%) against Democratic nominee Joshua Schoenberg.[14]
  • In 2012, resigned from the House and won the three-way general election for the Senate District 4 seat with 11,970 votes (50.8%) against incumbent Democrat Michael Katz and Libertarian nominee Marcia Davinci Groff.[15]
  • In 2014, Lavelle won the general election with 8,983 votes (61.9%) against Democratic nominee Sarah Buttner.[16]
  • In 2018, Lavelle lost his seat to Democratic challenger Laura Sturgeon, who received 11,251 votes (53.13%) to defeat Lavelle.[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Senator Gregory F. Lavelle (R)". Dover, Delaware: Delaware General Assembly. Retrieved January 5, 2019.
  2. ^ "Gregory Lavelle's Biography". Vote Smart. Retrieved November 13, 2013.
  3. ^ Eckholm, Erik (May 7, 2013). "Delaware, Continuing a Trend, Becomes the 11th State to Allow Same-Sex Unions". New York Times.
  4. ^ "Delaware becomes 11th state to adopt marriage equality". Coastal Point. May 23, 2013.
  5. ^ Schmidt, Sophia (November 7, 2018). "State House and Senate Minority Whips ousted by Democratic challengers". Delaware Public Media.
  6. ^ Goss, Scott; Parra, Esteban (November 6, 2018). "Political newcomer ousts state Senate's No. 2 Republican". The News Journal.
  7. ^ Goss, Scott (October 25, 2018). "Democratic Party ups the ante in feud with Sen. Greg Lavelle". The News Journal.
  8. ^ "State of Delaware Primary Election Official Results". Office of the State Election Commissioner. Delaware Department of Elections. September 9, 2000. Retrieved November 13, 2013.
  9. ^ "State of Delaware General Election Official Results". Office of the State Election Commissioner. Delaware Department of Elections. November 7, 2000. Retrieved November 13, 2013.
  10. ^ "State of Delaware General Election Official Results". Office of the State Election Commissioner. Delaware Department of Elections. November 5, 2002. Retrieved November 13, 2013.
  11. ^ "State of Delaware General Election Official Results". Office of the State Election Commissioner. Delaware Department of Elections. November 2, 2004. Retrieved November 13, 2013.
  12. ^ "State of Delaware General Election Official Results". Office of the State Election Commissioner. Delaware Department of Elections. November 7, 2006. Retrieved November 13, 2013.
  13. ^ "State of Delaware General Election Official Results". Office of the State Election Commissioner. Delaware Department of Elections. November 4, 2008. Retrieved November 13, 2013.
  14. ^ "State of Delaware General Election Official Results". Office of the State Election Commissioner. Delaware Department of Elections. November 2, 2010. Retrieved November 13, 2013.
  15. ^ "State of Delaware General Election Official Results". Office of the State Election Commissioner. Delaware Department of Elections. November 6, 2012. Retrieved November 13, 2013.
  16. ^ "State of Delaware General Election Official Results". Office of the State Election Commissioner. Delaware Department of Elections. November 7, 2014. Retrieved January 5, 2019.
  17. ^ "State of Delaware General Election Official Results". Office of the State Election Commissioner. Delaware Department of Elections. November 6, 2018. Retrieved January 5, 2019.

External links[edit]

Delaware House of Representatives
Preceded by
Richard C. Cathcart
Minority Leader
2011–2013
Succeeded by
Daniel Short