Gregory Petsko

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Gregory Petsko
Born 1948 (age 69–70)
Alma mater Princeton University
Awards Rhodes Scholarship
Member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences
Scientific career
Institutions Weill Cornell Medical College
Cornell University
Brandeis University
Wayne State University
MIT
Max Planck Institute
University of Oxford
Princeton University
Thesis Structural studies of triose phosphate isomerase. (1974)
Doctoral advisor David Chilton Phillips
Website brainandmind.weill.cornell.edu/lab/petsko-laboratory

Gregory A. Petsko (born 1948) is an American biochemist and member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Medicine, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has an endowed professorship at Weill Cornell Medical College, is an adjunct professor at Cornell University, and is a professor emeritus at Brandeis University.

As of 2014 Petsko's research interests are understanding the biochemical bases of neurological diseases like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and ALS, discovering drugs (especially by using structure-based drug design), that could therapeutically affect those biochemical targets, and seeing any resulting drug candidates tested in humans. He has made key contributions to the fields of protein crystallography, enzymology, and neuroscience.

Education[edit]

Petsko was an undergraduate at Princeton University. He received a Rhodes Scholarship, and obtained his doctorate from the University of Oxford supervised by David Chilton Phillips, studying Triosephosphate isomerase. he did a brief postdoctoral fellowship in Paris with Pierre Douzou, studying enzymology at low temperatures. In 1995 he did a sabbatical at the University of California at San Francisco with Ira Herskowitz, where he learned yeast genetics and molecular biology.

Career[edit]

Petsko's independent academic career included stints at Wayne State University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the Max Planck Institute, and, from 1991 until 2012, Brandeis University, where he was Professor of Biochemistry and of Chemistry and Director of the Rosenstiel Center. He is Past-President of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. In April 2010, he was elected to the American Philosophical Society.[1] In 2012, he announced that he was moving to Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City, where his wife, Laurie Glimcher, had been appointed Dean.[2] He was appointed at Weill Cornell as the Director of the Helen and Robert Appel Alzheimer's Disease Research Institute and the Arthur J. Mahon Professor of Neurology and Neuroscience in the Feil Family Brain and Mind Research Institute, at Cornell University as Adjunct Professor of Biomedical Engineering, and retained an appointment at Brandeis as Gyula and Katica Tauber Professor of Biochemistry and Chemistry, Emeritus.[3][4]

Research[edit]

As of 2014 Petsko's research interests are understanding the biochemical bases of neurological diseases like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and ALS, discovering drugs (especially by using structure-based drug design) that could therapeutically affect those biochemical targets, and seeing any resulting drug candidates tested in humans.[4][5]

Petsko's past research interests[6] have been in protein crystallography and enzymology. He is co-author with Dagmar Ringe of Protein Structure and Function.[7] He was also the author of a monthly column in Genome Biology[8][9] modelled after an amusing column in Current Biology penned by Sydney Brenner.[10] Petsko is best known for his collaborative work with Dagmar Ringe, in which they used X-ray crystallography to solve important problems in protein function including protein dynamics as a function of temperature and problems in mechanistic enzymology.[11][12][13]

At MIT and Brandeis, he and Dagmar Ringe trained a large number of current leaders in structural molecular biology who now have leadership roles in science. These individuals include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.brandeis.edu/now/images/petskoaps.html
  2. ^ Tate Herbert for The Justice November 13, 2012 Petsko set to leave University for New York City in 2014
  3. ^ Weill Cornell Newsroom. April 16, 2014 No Stone Unturned: Interview with Gregory Petsko
  4. ^ a b Petsko Laboratory Homepage
  5. ^ Columbia University Newsroom. April 20, 2014 'Chaperone' compounds offer new approach to Alzheimer's treatment
  6. ^ List of publications from Microsoft Academic
  7. ^ Petsko, Gregory A. (2008). Protein Structure and Function (Primers in Biology). Oxford [Oxfordshire]: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-955684-9. 
  8. ^ Petsko, G. A. (2000). "The grail problem". Genome Biology. 1 (1): comment002.comment001–comment002.comment001. doi:10.1186/gb-2000-1-1-comment002. PMC 138819Freely accessible. PMID 11104515. 
  9. ^ Petsko, G. A. (2012). "A case of the flu". Genome Biology. 13 (2): 146. doi:10.1186/gb-2012-13-2-146. PMC 3334562Freely accessible. PMID 22364112. 
  10. ^ Brenner, S. (2002). "The worm's turn". Current Biology. 12 (21): R713. doi:10.1016/s0960-9822(02)01241-1. PMID 12419193. 
  11. ^ Frauenfelder, H.; Petsko, G. A.; Tsernoglou, D. (1979). "Temperature-dependent X-ray diffraction as a probe of protein structural dynamics". Nature. 280 (5723): 558–563. doi:10.1038/280558a0. PMID 460437. 
  12. ^ Schlichting, I.; Berendzen, J.; Chu, K.; Stock, A. M.; Maves, S. A.; Benson, D. E.; Sweet, R. M.; Ringe, D.; Petsko, G. A.; Sligar, S. G. (2000). "The Catalytic Pathway of Cytochrome P450cam at Atomic Resolution". Science. 287 (5458): 1615–1622. doi:10.1126/science.287.5458.1615. PMID 10698731. 
  13. ^ Karplus, M.; Petsko, G. A. (1990). "Molecular dynamics simulations in biology". Nature. 347 (6294): 631–639. doi:10.1038/347631a0. PMID 2215695.