Grey gurnard

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Grey gurnard
Eutrigla gurnardus.jpg
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Scorpaeniformes
Family: Triglidae
Genus: Eutrigla
Fraser-Brunner, 1938
Species:
E. gurnardus
Binomial name
Eutrigla gurnardus

The grey gurnard (Eutrigla gurnardus) is a species of sea robin native to the eastern Atlantic Ocean, the Mediterranean Sea, and the Black Sea. This fish can be found at depths from 10 to 340 metres (33 to 1,115 ft), though it is not normally found below 150 metres (490 ft). This species grows to a total length of 60 cm (24 in), though usually reaching up to 30 cm (12 in).[1] This species is the only known member of its genus.[2]

In Ireland, the fish has been called the cuckoo fish, knoud, or noud.[3]

Behaviour[edit]

As with other sea robins, grey gurnards produce sounds. Sound production in this species is often associated with competition for food. Small individuals produce more sounds than larger ones, and emit more "grunts" than "knocks", probably because they more often compete for food by contest tactics whereas larger specimens predominantly scramble for food.[4]

Fisheries[edit]

Grey gurnards are of commercial importance as a food.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2012). "Eutrigla gurnardus" in FishBase. December 2012 version.
  2. ^ "Eutrigla Fraser-Brunner, 1938". Integrated Taxonomic Information System.
  3. ^ "The Ancient and Present State of the County of Cork". The ancient and present state of the county and city of Cork. Guy & Co. Ltd. Guy and Co. Ltd. 1893. Retrieved 30 Nov 2013.
  4. ^ Amorim, M. C. P.; Hawkins, A. D. (2005). "Ontogeny of acoustic and feeding behaviour in the grey gurnard, Eutrigla gurnardus". Ethology. 111 (3): 255–269. doi:10.1111/j.1439-0310.2004.01061.x. hdl:10400.12/1444.
  5. ^ "Eutrigla gurnardus (Linnaeus, 1758)". FAO Species Fact Sheets. FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Department. 2013. Retrieved 10 June 2013.

External links[edit]