Bennett Griffin

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Bennett Griffin
Bundesarchiv Bild 102-13655, Bennett Griffin.jpg
Bennett Griffin in Berlin following an aborted attempt to fly around the world in 1932.
Full name Bennett Hill Griffin
Born (1895-09-22)September 22, 1895
Barton, Mississippi, USA
Died April 26, 1978(1978-04-26) (aged 82)
Washington, D.C.
Aviation career
Air force U.S. Army Air Force
Rank Colonel
Awards Legion of Merit
Distinguished Flying Cross

Bennett Hill Griffin (September 22, 1895 – April 26, 1978) was an American aviator. Griffin was born in Mississippi in 1895, but was raised in Oklahoma arriving around 1900. In 1932, Griffin along with Jimmie Mattern attempted to break the world record for aerial circumnavigation set by Wiley Post and Harold Gatty. In 1946 / 1947, he administered the relocation of the Civil Aeronautics Administration center from Houston to Oklahoma City, where it later became known as the FAA's Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center. He served as the Director of Washington National Airport from 1947 until 1959. In 1941, he was also the first pilot to land at National Airport, flying for American Airlines at the time.[1] He died in 1978 and was buried in Arlington National Cemetery.

Aerial circumnavigation record attempts[edit]

July 1932, Griffin and Jimmie Mattern flew "The Century of Progress",[2] a Lockheed Vega, powered by a Pratt & Whitney Wasp engine, from Floyd Bennett Field, New York to Harbor Grace, Newfoundland, and then non-stop to Berlin, Germany in 18:41 hours. They continued as far as Borisov, Belarus, USSR in this failed round-the-world flight attempt. They did set a new record for crossing the Atlantic Ocean in 10 hours, 50 minutes.[3]

Honors[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ History of Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport Archived May 18, 2009, at the Wayback Machine.
  2. ^ LOCKHEED VEGA Model 5 NC869E. Delta Mike Airfield, Inc. Accessed May 14, 2009.
  3. ^ "World Flyers reach Berlin and press on." Associated Press. Jefferson City Post-Tribune. Jefferson City, Missouri. Wednesday, July 6, 1932. Page 1.
  4. ^ Wesley L. McDonald Elder Statesman Awards. National Aeronautic Association.

External links[edit]