Grilly

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Grilly
Saint-Benoît church
Saint-Benoît church
Coat of arms of Grilly
Coat of arms
Location of Grilly
Grilly is located in France
Grilly
Grilly
Grilly is located in Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes
Grilly
Grilly
Coordinates: 46°19′50″N 6°06′54″E / 46.3306°N 6.115°E / 46.3306; 6.115Coordinates: 46°19′50″N 6°06′54″E / 46.3306°N 6.115°E / 46.3306; 6.115
CountryFrance
RegionAuvergne-Rhône-Alpes
DepartmentAin
ArrondissementGex
CantonGex
IntercommunalityPays de Gex
Government
 • Mayor (2008–2014) Jean-Pierre Mossiere
Area
1
7.50 km2 (2.90 sq mi)
Population
(2008)2
709
 • Density95/km2 (240/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+01:00 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+02:00 (CEST)
INSEE/Postal code
01180 /01220
Elevation459–751 m (1,506–2,464 ft)
(avg. 474 m or 1,555 ft)
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.

Grilly is a commune in the Ain department in eastern France.

Population[edit]

Historical population
YearPop.±%
1962272—    
1968302+11.0%
1975418+38.4%
1982520+24.4%
1990634+21.9%
1999612−3.5%
2008709+15.8%

History[edit]

Jean I de Grailly was born at Grilly near Gex on the shores of Lac Léman in the County of Savoy. He probably travelled to England during the reign of Henry III of England in the entourage of Peter II of Savoy, In 1262 he was already a knight in the household of Prince Edward, the king's heir and future King Edward I of England. In 1263 he had attained the status of a counsellor of the young prince. He was made Edward's Seneschal in Gascony from 1278. In 1279, Jean travelled to Amiens and to England to negotiate the Treaty of Amiens, which ended the state of war between Edward of England and Philip III of France and returned the Agenais to English control. Jean de Grailly eventually fell short of funds for his activities, since his expenses need approval from the Exchequer before he could receive his salary. He took to exploitation and illegal exactions from the peasants, whose complaints eventually reached the ears of Edward I. He was removed from office sometime between June 1286 and Spring 1287. Led a French force alongside the English led by Otto de Grandson at the Fall of Acre in 1291.

See also[edit]

References[edit]