Grito Mexicano

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Grito Mexicano (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈɡɾito mehiˈkano], Mexican Shout), or simply Grito (Spanish for: Shout).

Is a common Mexican interjection, used as an expression of joy or excitement, that has become one of the internationally known behaviors of typical Mexican culture.

Characteristics[edit]

This interjection is similar to the yahoo or yeehaw of the American cowboy during a hoedown, with added trills and onomatopoeia closer to "aaah" or "aaaayyyyeeee", that resemble a laugh while performing it.

The first sound is typically held as long as possible, leaving enough breath for a trailing set of trills.

Usage[edit]

The Grito is sometimes used as part of the official remembrance of the Shout of Dolores, during the celebration of the Mexican Independence Day.[1]

Although the Grito Mexicano has patriotic connotations, it is more commonly used in non-formal settings, where is belted at crowded celebrations or parties with friends and family. The normal position for the yell to be inserted is after a toast, or during a very familiar song (at a musical interlude, a bridge or after the first few notes) either by the performer or excited members of the audience.

It's commonly done immediately prior to the popular Mexican war cry: "¡Viva Mexico, Señores!" (Long live Mexico!, Gentlemen!), or its more rough version "¡Viva Mexico, Cabrones!" (Spanish for: Long live Mexico, Cabrones!).[2]

In rural areas it is also common to see people do celebratory gunfire, before or after the shout.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "El Grito: Mexico's Cry for Independence". Mexconnect. Gaceta Consular. September 1996. Retrieved March 21, 2014. 
  2. ^ cabrones translation