Grizzly Tales for Gruesome Kids

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Grizzly Tales for Gruesome Kids
Grizzly Tales for Gruesome Kids logo.png
Official franchise logo
Created byJamie Rix
Original workGrizzly Tales for Gruesome Kids by Jamie Rix (1990)
Print publications
Book(s)13
Films and television
Animated series
  • Grizzly Tales for Gruesome Kids (2000–2006)
  • Grizzly Tales: Cautionary Tales for Lovers of Squeam! (2011–2012)
Miscellaneous
Country of originUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

Grizzly Tales for Gruesome Kids (often nicknamed Grizzly Tales) is the generic trademarked title for a series of award-winning children's books by British author Jamie Rix which were later adapted into an animated television series of the same name produced for ITV. Known for its surreal black comedy and horror, the franchise was immensely popular with children and adults, and the cartoon became one of the most-watched programmes on CITV in the 2000s; a reboot of the cartoon series was produced for Nickelodeon UK and NickToons UK in 2011 with 26 episodes (split into 2 series) with the added tagline of Cautionary Tales for Lovers of Squeam!. The first four books in the series were published between 1990 and 2001 by a variety of publishers (such as Hodder Children's Books, Puffin, and Scholastic) and have since gone out of print but are available as audio adaptations through Audible and iTunes. The ITV cartoon was produced by Honeycomb Animation and aired between 2000 and 2006 with 6 series; reruns aired on the Nickelodeon channels along with the 2011 series.

Each book in the franchise contained several cautionary tales about children of many ages and the consequences of their antisocial actions. Due to how far-fetched and fantastical the stories could become, it is up to the reader whether they found the series frightening or amusing, but the franchise is usually categorised as children's horror. When the series was adapted for the CITV/Nickelodeon cartoons, the book chapters became ten-minute episodes that were narrated by comic actor Nigel Planer, and created by Honeycomb Animation, with author Rix as co-director.

The franchise received critical acclaim, noted by the themes of horror surrealism and adult paranoia blended with common children's book absurdity. The Daily Telegraph said of the CITV cartoon, "Mix Dahl with Belloc and you can anticipate with glee these animated tales of Jamie Rix. Even William Brown's antics pale..."[1] and The Sunday Times wrote: "They are superior morality stories and Nigel Planer reads them with a delight that borders on the fiendish."[1]

Plot[edit]

The Grizzly Tales series features short stories about cautionary tales and imitates an episodic anthology horror (similar to The Twilight Zone or Tales from the Darkside) with each book chapter a different short story. The typical structure would be a brief glance at a main character's typical day in their life, followed by a change in their routine (e.g. a new possession comes their way or a decision made by them/a supporting character) which eventually goes wrong in a hoisted with their own petard way, with the story ending with the main character either being killed, mutilated, involuntarily shapeshifting, or kidnapped by something/someone supernatural. They usually star children whose misbehaviour (laziness, greediness, vanity, lying, etc.) is failed to be reined in by their parents or guardians, who vary from encouraging it, ignoring it, failing to be firm with their punishments, or do nothing because they are used to being submissive (and are sometimes the victims of their child's abuse). There are exceptions, however, as some stories are about adults, or set in the past, or are pastiches.

Book series[edit]

Development[edit]

Grizzly Tales for Gruesome Kids

AuthorJamie Rix
IllustratorBobbie Spargo, Ross Collins, Steven Pattison
Cover artistBobbie Spargo, Ross Collins, Honeycomb Animation, Sue Heap, Steven Pattison
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish
GenreChildren's horror, black comedy
PublisherAndré Deutsch, Orion, Scholastic UK, Puffin Books, Hatchette, Hodder
Media typePrint (hardback & paperback), Audiobook (cassette, CD & MP3), E-book
No. of books13

The first story Rix ever created was The Spaghetti Man, after using this new cautionary tale as a white lie to his first son.[2] It was about a little boy who refused to behave at the kitchen table and is kidnapped by an invisible force, that takes him to a factory to turn him into lasagne. Rix took note of how the lie had made his four-year-old eat every meal without hesitations, which would inspire a series that could scare children into behaving themselves.[2] The story of the Spaghetti Man would be included in the franchise debut's Grizzly Tales for Gruesome Kids,[3] which was published in 1990 by André Deutsch's eponymous publishing house. Its popularity led to three sequels: Ghostly Tales for Ghastly Kids (1992), Fearsome Tales for Fiendish Kids (1996), and More Grizzly Tales for Gruesome Kids (2001); the latter book was released as the first cartoon aired on CITV. Possibly due to the franchise gaining popularity, the first four books have been re-released numerous times amongst Puffin and Orion. A variety of illustrators designed the front covers, but the success of the CITV cartoon led to the front covers being redesigned by Honeycomb Productions to look like screencaps of the cartoon characters.[4] After an unspecified number of years, the books went out of print.[1]

Six years later, Rix created a new series for the franchise, now named Grizzly Tales: Cautionary Tales for Lovers of Squeam!; eight books were published between 2007 and 2008, the ninth a compilation full of 12 previously-published stories from the first and second in the brand.[1] This series borrowed heavily from the CITV cartoon's format by imitating its framing device style of a character telling the stories to the audience, whereas the previous book series was only a collection of short stories. This new character was The Night Night Porter,[1] a creepy owner of a hotel (named The Hot Hell Darkness)[1] that used vague anecdotes and proverbs to show the reader how they would relate to the stories he was about to tell, and would open his check-in book where the stories have been placed. After telling the stories, he would punish the misbehaving kids to spend eternity in one of his hotel rooms.[5]

Recurring features[edit]

Locations of stories varied. Some took place in fictionalised versions of English towns (e.g. Colchester)[6] and others did not (Saucy by Sea).[7] Not all took place in the country of the franchise's origin: "It's Only a Game, Sport!" was set in Australia, for example.[8] "The Chipper Chums Go Scrumping" is a pastiche of the works of Enid Blyton and is set in the Kentish countryside in 1952.[9]

Naming conventions highlighted the humour. The Independent on Sunday pointed out, "Jamie Rix’s splendidly nasty short stories can be genuinely scary, but as the protagonists are obnoxious brats with names like Peregrine and Tristram, you may find yourself cheering as they meet their sticky ends."[1] Some of the characters' surnames implied their roles in the story (Mr. and Mrs. Frightfully-Busy were workaholics,[10] Johnny Bullneck is an aggressive school bully,[11] and Serena Slurp is greedy)[12] whereas the more ridiculous the family name is, the more unpleasant they are in the story: Fedora Funkelfink the con artist;[13] and the upper-middle-class Crumpdump family, who trophy hunt to impress their spoilt children.[14] "Knock Down Ginger", meanwhile, is set in a fictional town called Nimby, a notorious home for middle-class snobs.[15] Some of the punishments that the horrible characters have are based on puns: loud-mouthed Dolores from "Silence is Golden" is taken to an alchemist and is turned into a gold statue;[6] "Kiss and Make Up" was a double meaning title about a girl who used make up to look prettier so that she could have her first kiss with a handsome boy in her school.[16] Other titles are pop-culture references ("Fatal Attraction",[17] "The Big Sleep",[18] "The Barber of Civil",[7] "Monty's Python",[19] etc.).

Story issues and morals were relatable to the reader (particularly the parents that would be reading to their children), such as television addiction,[20] sibling rivalry,[19][12] trying to fit in with their friends,[21] personal hygiene,[22] refusing to eat their dinner,[3] punctuality,[23] but others are about theft[24] and deforestation,[25] as well as an implied anti hunting message in "An Elephant Never Forgets".[14] Supernatural characters varied from witch doctors (Doctor Moribundus,[26] The Barber of Civil),[7] poltergeists (The Spaghetti Man),[3] to snake-oil salesmen.[27] There were also fairies, talking animals,[19] aliens,[22] inanimate objects coming to life (such as drawings), and witches, as well as cursed objects,[28] and absurd occurrences (such as piglets travelling across the countryside disguised as a man);[29] other villains, like Farmer Tregowan,[9] were regular people with extremely violent methods of punishment. Children could be shapeshifted,[12] eaten alive,[29] kidnapped, or turned into food.[3] Due to many of the parents' child neglect and lack of discipline, many of the outcomes of their children's stories do not appear to affect their lives. Some of the workaholic parents are too busy to notice that their child has either been maimed or has disappeared[3] and others are implied to be such insignificance in their children's lives that they do not appear as characters in the story. Meanwhile, happy (or bittersweet) endings were about the character learning from their bad behaviour and turning their lives around before things got worse.[30]

Book list[edit]

No. Title Date of publication No. of pages Publisher Notes Original ISBN Other ISBN Ref.
1 Grizzly Tales for Gruesome Kids 17 May 1990 112 André Deutsch Limited Out of print by 2010 ISBN 9780233985312
2 Ghostly Tales for Ghastly Kids 14 February 1992 144 ISBN 9780590540049
3 Fearsome Tales for Fiendish Kids 8 April 1996 224 Hodder Children's Books ISBN 978-0340667354 ISBN 978-0340640951
4 More Grizzly Tales for Gruesome Kids 19 January 2001 304 Scholastic ISBN 9780439998185 n/a [39]
5 Nasty Little Beasts 5 April 2007 128 Orion Children's Books ISBN 978-1842555491
6 Gruesome Grown Ups 5 April 2007 128 ISBN 978-1842555507 [42][a]
7 The "Me!" Monsters 5 July 2007 128 ISBN 978-1842555514 [43][a]
8 Freaks of Nature 5 July 2007 128 ISBN 978-1842555521 [44]
9 Terror Time Toys 7 February 2008 128 ISBN 978-1842555538 [45]
10 Blubbers and Sickers 7 February 2008 128 ISBN 978-1842555545 [46]
11 The Gnaughty Gnomes of "NO!" 1 July 2008 128 ISBN 978-1842556474 [47]
12 Superzeroes 1 July 2008 128 ISBN 978-1842556481 [48]
13 A Grizzly Dozen 4 June 2009 256 ISBN 978-1444000122 [49]

Television series[edit]

Between 2000 and 2012, two animated adaptations were made for CITV and NickToons. Both were produced and animated by Honeycomb Animation as well as Rix's own television company Elephant (later renamed Little Brother).[50] Producing partner Nigel Planer performed in the cartoons as the narrator of the stories during each episodes' framing devices.[51] The first animated adaptation aired on CITV between January 2000 and October 2006,[52][53][54][55] and the second aired on Nicktoons between May 2011 and November 2012.

Merchandise[edit]

Kindle versions of the first four books were briefly available to buy in 2011.[56]

Nigel Planer was the narrator for this series and played Uncle Grizzly. He also narrated Fearsome Tales for Fiendish Kids on audiobook.[57] Bill Wallis narrated More Grizzly Tales for Gruesome Kids,[58] and Grizzly Tales for Gruesome Kids and Ghostly Tales for Ghastly Kids were both read by Andrew Sachs.[59][60] Orion Audiobooks have also released full CD recordings of the books,[32] read by Rupert Degas.[5] Audio Go have re-released the original Grizzly Tales for Gruesome Kids audiobook on CD and download.[61]

Reception[edit]

The franchise received a positive reaction from critics, and audiences of many ages. The second cartoon programme frequently appeared on audience-rated "favourite programme" lists on Nickelodeon.[62] A reporter for The Sunday Times noted "I played all five [audiobook adaptations] to my own junior jury aged 12, 7 and 5. They sat spellbound for 75 minutes, a rare event."[1] Books for Your Children predicted that the series would be entertaining for everyone: "An excellent book of stories for all but the most timid ... the accumulation of grimness is also part of the effect, so older children can enjoy this collection by themselves and adults can have a marvellous time reading them to younger ones",[1] whereas The Evening Standard encouraged it: "It may be a children's story, but many a modern-day trendy parent could watch and learn."[1] The School Librarian added: "Jamie Rix tells us that bad ghosts always stay that way but bad children can improve, which is reassuring because his stories are full of unpleasant children."

Honeycomb producer Susan Bor explained: "What really appealed to me about adapting these wonderful stories for TV was that they were new and fresh, there was nothing out there like it and I particularly wanted the design and look of the series to have that originality."[63] When the CITV cartoon debuted, Carol McDaid of The Observer referred to it as "a quirky new animated series".[64] Reviews noted a connection between the franchise and other respected children's media: "This beautifully conceived and executed series follows in the centuries-old Grimm tradition of sadistic fairy-tale fantasy," wrote Victor Lewis-Smith in The Evening Standard, "and there's something reminiscent of Heinrich Hoffman's Shockheaded Peter about the fiendishly cruel (yet satisfyingly appropriate) fates that befall badly behaved children..."[65] The Daily Telegraph compared the series to Roald Dahl, William Browne, and Hilaire Belloc,[1] a possible reference to Belloc's poetry book Cautionary Tales for Children.

Stories from the books were read by Nigel Planer on radio throughout the 1990s.[63][66][67][68] From 1990, the show appeared on BBC Radio 5,[66][67][69][70] and in 1994, it appeared on BBC Radio 4.[68]

Awards and nominations[edit]

Both the books and the two television adaptations have received awards and nominations for their work.

Books[edit]

Year Award Category Nominee Result Ref
1990 Nestlé Smarties Book Prize Fiction, Age 9-11 Grizzly Tales for Gruesome Kids Won

Television[edit]

List of published short stories[edit]

Key
N/A Denounces information needed but is not included yet
Denounces information that did not happen

Grizzly Tales for Gruesome Kids (1990)[edit]

Ghostly Tales for Ghastly Kids (1992)[edit]

Fearsome Tales for Fiendish Kids (1996)[edit]

More Grizzly Tales For Gruesome Kids (2001)[edit]

Nasty Little Beasts (April 2007)[edit]

No. Title Theme Cartoon Episode
Episode Name Series Episode number Air date
1The Grub A Blub BlubLaziness"The Grub A Blub Blub"50531 March 2006
Savannah Slumberson prefers living in her bedroom and is furious when her active parents adamantly decide to go on a camping holiday at resort miles away from their city.
2Monty's PythonSibling rivalry, animal abuse"Monty's Python"50430 March 2006
Monty tortures his sister Mayflower with traumatising pranks and decides to take them to the next level by buying a python (he names "SisterEater") to terrorise her more.
3The Lobster's Screamspoilt children"The Lobster's Scream"60917 October 2006
Shannon Shellfish is empowered when her parents follow her demands but when they ask her what she wants, she is stunned, and soon becomes obsessed with a restaurant owner's lobster costume.
4Wolf ChildEnvy, sibling rivalry"Wolf Child"5063 April 2006
Garth MacQueen tries to get his baby sister Moira kidnapped when his family hear about wolves terrorising their neighbourhood.
5The Fruit BatFussy eater"The Fruit Bat"50329 March 2006
Cherie Stone tells her parents she refuses to eat fruit.
6The Clothes PigsLaziness, greed"The Clothes Pigs"60320 September 2006
In the city, a boy named Trueman "Truffle" Snuffle makes his parents do everything for him. In nearby farmland, piglets starve as their greedy family members push them out of the way to get a bigger helping in the trough.

Gruesome Grown Ups (April 2007)[edit]

No. Title Theme Cartoon Episode
Episode Name Series Episode number Air date
1Jamie's School DinnersFussy eater"Jamie's School Dinners"60118 September 2006
A boy named Jamie is obsessed with junk food and is forced to go on a diet.
2Silence Is GoldenManners and rudeness"Silence is Golden"5107 April 2006
A girl named Dolores Bellicose enjoyed shouting because it made her the most heard person in her school. The school librarians are not impressed and plan to teach her a lesson.
3The Old Tailor of Pelting MoorN/A"The Old Tailor of Pelting Moor"61018 October 2006
A boy named Jumbo Ferrari wants a new "life suit".
4Her Majesty's MoleyAnimal abuse"Her Majesty's Moley"51110 April 2006
A girl called Mattie enjoys torturing/killing moles.
5The Soul StealerBlackmail, abuse of power"The Soul Stealer"51312 April 2006
A girl called Poppy is given a new mobile phone with a camera and uses it to blackmail people around her.
6Nobby's NightmareN/A"Nobby's Nightmare"60716 October 2006
A boy Nobby finds it hard to distinguish whether he is in a dream or not, but Sophie really is the girl of his dreams.

The "Me!" Monsters (July 2007)[edit]

No. Title Theme Cartoon Episode
Episode Name Series Episode number Air date
1The Apostrophic ExpositorN/A"The Apostrophic Expositor"2 (Grizzly Tales)037 September 2011
N/A
2Kiss And Make UpVanity"Kiss and Make Up"5085 April 2006
A girl named Holly Hotlips wants to have her first kiss and is visited by a (literal) two-faced fairy, who gives her advice and some makeup to look prettier.
3The Kingdom of WaxN/A"Kingdom of Wax"1 (Grizzly Tales)119 May 2011
N/A
4The Blood DoctorN/A"The Blood Doctor"2 (Grizzly Tales)015 September 2011
N/A
5The Ugly PrinceN/A"The Ugly Prince"1 (Grizzly Tales)033 May 2011
N/A
6Big HeadPride and arrogance"Big Head"61118 October 2006
A boy named Sammy Slitherall becomes smug when he is picked as a team mascot.

Freaks of Nature (July 2007)[edit]

No. Title Theme Cartoon Episode
Episode Name Series Episode number Air date
1Frank Einstein's MonsterN/A"Frank Einstein's Monster"2 (Grizzly Tales)0729 October 2012
N/A
2RecyclopsRecycling"Recyclops"60219 September 2006
N/A
3The Weather WitchN/A"The Weather Witch"5074 April 2006
A boy Jack Frost does not understand how horrible cold weather is, especially to the elderly.
4William The ConkererGreed, arrogance"William the Conkerer"5096 April 2006
A boy named William is determined to be the Conkers king of the school playground so he sneaks out of his house at midnight to destroy every conker tree in the area, angering a hermit who lives in a treehouse.
5Hear No Weevil, See No WeevilN/A"Hear No Weevil See No Weevil"1 (Grizzly Tales)043 May 2011
N/A
6Tom TimePunctuality"Tom Time"61319 October 2006
A boy named Tom is never on time for anything in his life and when science discovers that the end of the world is imminent, Tom's mother is determined to make him on time for the evacuation spaceships.

Terror Time Toys (February 2008)[edit]

No. Title Theme Cartoon Episode
Episode Name Series Episode number Air date
1The Butcher BoyGreed and attention-seeking"The Butcher Boy"50228 March 2006
Gilbert is obsessed with money and fame, and does anything to be the richest boy in his school who gets the most attention.
2The Bugaboo BearN/A"The Bugaboo Bear"50127 March 2006
A girl named Emily Stiff gets a new teddy bear from the latest popular brand but soon becomes bored with it and starts to vandalise it.
3Why Boys Make Better BurglarsN/A"Why Boys Make Better Burglers"60421 September 2006
The Burglar family welcome a new son named Billy and his father cannot wait to teach him the family's tricks.
4Puppet on a StringN/A"Puppet on a String"51211 April 2006
N/A
5The Death RattleN/A"The Spelling Bee"1 (Grizzly Tales)12N/A
N/A
6eBoyComputer addiction"eBoy"60616 October 2006
N/A

Blubbers and Sicksters (February 2008)[edit]

No. Title Theme Cartoon Episode
Episode Name Series Episode number Air date
1The Piranha SistersGaslighting"The Piranha Sisters"61219 October 2006
A girl named Dorothy May Piranha loves pranking her sister, Petey, but these pranks are malicious and warp Petey's common sense, which gets her in trouble with their parents. When Petey's birthday arrives, Dorothy May plans to make the party an unforgettable one, but a skeleton spirit warns her that her pranks might go horribly wrong.
2The Crystal EyeSelfishness"A Grizzly New Year's Tale: The Crystal Eye"41531 December 2004
A boy named Fick is tired of sharing everything with his twin brother Finn but then the family receives a mirror for Christmas.
3Cat's EyesN/A"Cat's Eyes"1 (Grizzly Tales)064 May 2011
A mean older sister named Cat Clore tries to coerce her siblings into doing her wishes.
4The Hair FairiesN/A"The Hair Fairies"2 (Grizzly Tales)026 September 2011
Fairies visit a boy named Hemp Sock when he envies his sister Moonunit's hair.
5The Watermelon Babieswasting water"The Watermelon Babies"60522 September 2006
Two sisters named Kitty and Winnie who live in a country suffering from a severe drought ignore the Hosepipe ban and abuse their power over water for their entertainment.
6The Nuclear Wartnuclear power, sibling rivalry"The Nuclear Wart"2 (Grizzly Tales)132 November 2012
Tom and Jerry are two brothers who despise each other to the point of their negative energy manifesting into an evergrowing wart.

The Gnaughty Gnomes of "NO!" (July 2008)[edit]

No. Title Theme Cartoon Episode
Episode Name Series Episode number Air date
1TinkerbellN/A"Tinklebell"1 (Grizzly Tales)012 May 2011
N/A
2The Long FaceN/A"The Long Face"1 (Grizzly Tales)106 May 2011
N/A
3The Dragon MothN/A"The Dragon Moth"1 (Grizzly Tales)096 May 2011
N/A
4Sick To DeathN/A"Sick To Death"1 (Grizzly Tales)022 May 2011
N/A
5Message in a BottleN/A"Message in a Bottle"1 (Grizzly Tales)075 May 2011
N/A
6LazybonesN/A"Lazy Bones"2 (Grizzly Tales)0610 September 2011
N/A

Superzeroes (July 2008)[edit]

No. Title Theme Cartoon Episode
Episode Name Series Episode number Air date
1Fatal AttractionEgo"Nerves of Steel"2 (Grizzly Tales)04
N/A
2Little AngelDishonesty"Little Angel"1 (Grizzly Tales)085 May 2011
N/A
3The Flat-Pack KidDestruction and vandalism"The Flat Pack Kid"1 (Grizzly Tales)1310 May 2011
N/A
4The WormN/A"The Worm"2 (Grizzly Tales)059 September 2011
N/A
5The Little Flower GirlN/A"The Little Flower Girl"2 (Grizzly Tales)1030 October 2012
N/A
6The Rise And Fall of the Evil GuffManners and etiquete"The Rise and Fall of The Evil Guff"1 (Grizzly Tales)054 May 2011
A boy named Bart Thumper uses flatulence to get his way.

A Grizzly Dozen (2009)[edit]

This was a compilation book containing stories from numerous books in the Grizzly Tales: Cautionary Tales for Lovers of Squeam! series.

  1. The Grub A Blub Blub
  2. Monty's Python
  3. The Lobster's Scream
  4. Wolf Child
  5. The Fruit Bat
  6. The Clothes Pigs
  7. Jamie's School Dinners
  8. Silence Is Golden
  9. The Old Tailor of Pelting Moor
  10. Her Majesty's Moley
  11. The Soul Stealer
  12. Nobby's Nightmare

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Translated into Swedish by Lena Ollmark in 2008[40]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Grizzly Tales — Jamie Rix". jamierix.com. Retrieved 20 September 2019.
  2. ^ a b "About – Jamie Rix". jamierix.j-host.co.uk. Retrieved 21 September 2019.
  3. ^ a b c d e Rix, Jamie (17 May 1990). "The Spaghetti Man". Grizzly Tales for Gruesome Kids (1st ed.). Andre Deutsch. ISBN 9780233985312.
  4. ^ Bor, Simon. "The Grizzly Corner of My Bookshelf". simons-head.blogspot.com. Blogspot. Archived from the original on 19 December 2019. Retrieved 21 September 2019.
  5. ^ a b "Books and Other thoughts - Grizzly Tales: Nasty Little Beasts". www.booksandotherthoughts.com/. Blogspot. 27 March 2011. Archived from the original on 19 December 2019. Retrieved 25 September 2019.
  6. ^ a b Rix, Jamie (5 April 2007). "Silence is Golden". Gruesome Grown Ups. Orion Publishing. ISBN 978-1842555507.
  7. ^ a b c Rix, Jamie (17 May 1990). "The Barber of Civil". Grizzly Tales for Gruesome Kids (1 ed.). Scholastic Books. ISBN 9780233985312.
  8. ^ Rix, Jamie (19 January 2001). "It's Only a Game, Sport!". More Grizzly Tales For Gruesome Kids. Scholastic Books. ISBN 9780439998185.
  9. ^ a b Rix, Jamie (8 April 1996). "The Chipper Chums Go Scrumping". Fearsome Tales for Fiendish Kids. Hodder Children's Books. ISBN 978-0340640951.
  10. ^ Rix, Jamie (17 May 1990). "The New Nanny". Grizzly Tales for Gruesome Kids (first ed.). Scholastic Books. ISBN 9780233985312.
  11. ^ Rix, Jamie (8 April 1996). "Fat Boy with a Trumpet". Fearsome Tales for Fiendish Kids. Hodder Children's Books. ISBN 978-0340640951.
  12. ^ a b c Rix, Jamie (8 April 1996). "Death by Chocolate". Fearsome Tales for Fiendish Kids. Hodder Children's Books. ISBN 978-0340640951.
  13. ^ Rix, Jamie (8 April 1996). "The Cat Burglar". Fearsome Tales for Fiendish Kids. Hodder Children's Books. ISBN 978-0340640951.
  14. ^ a b Rix, Jamie (14 February 1992). "An Elephant Never Forgets". Ghostly Tales for Ghastly Kids (1 ed.). Scholastic Books. ISBN 9780590540049.
  15. ^ Rix, Jamie (19 January 2001). "Knock Down Ginger". More Grizzly Tales For Gruesome Kids. Scholastic Books. ISBN 9780439998185.
  16. ^ Rix, Jamie (5 July 2007). "Kiss and Make Up". The "Me!" Monsters. Orion Publishing. ISBN 978-1842555514.
  17. ^ Rix, Jamie (1 July 2008). "Fatal Attraction". Superzeroes. Orion Publishing. ISBN 978-1842556481.
  18. ^ Rix, Jamie (14 February 1992). "The Big Sleep". Ghostly Tales for Ghastly Kids (1 ed.). Scholastic Books. ISBN 9780590540049.
  19. ^ a b c Rix, Jamie (5 April 2007). "Monty's Python". Nasty Little Beasts. Orion Publishing. ISBN 978-1842555491.
  20. ^ Rix, Jamie (17 May 1990). "Glued to the Telly". Grizzly Tales For Gruesome Kids (1st ed.). Scholastic Books. ISBN 9780233985312.
  21. ^ Rix, Jamie (8 April 1996). "Well'ard Willard". Fearsome Tales for Fiendish Kids. Hodder Children's Books. ISBN 978-0340640951.
  22. ^ a b Rix, Jamie (19 January 2001). "Dirty Bertie". More Grizzly Tales For Gruesome Kids. Scholastic Books. ISBN 9780439998185.
  23. ^ Rix, Jamie (5 July 2007). "Tom Time". Freaks of Nature. Orion Publishing.
  24. ^ Rix, Jamie (14 February 1992). "Tag". Ghostly Tales for Ghastly Kids (1 ed.). Scholastic Books. ISBN 9780590540049.
  25. ^ Rix, Jamie (14 February 1992). "Burgers". Ghostly Tales for Ghastly Kids (1 ed.). Scholastic Books. ISBN 9780590540049.
  26. ^ Rix, Jamie (8 April 1996). "Doctor Moribundus". Fearsome Tales for Fiendish Kids. Hodder Children's Books. ISBN 978-0340640951.
  27. ^ Rix, Jamie (19 January 2001). "The Gas-Man Cometh". More Grizzly Tales For Gruesome Kids. Scholastic Books. ISBN 9780439998185.
  28. ^ Rix, Jamie (8 April 1996). "Athlete's Foot". Fearsome Tales for Fiendish Kids. Hodder Children's Books. ISBN 978-0340640951.
  29. ^ a b Rix, Jamie (2007). "The Clothes Pigs". Nasty Little Beasts. Orion Publishing. ISBN 978-1842555491.
  30. ^ Rix, Jamie (17 May 1990). "The Princess' Clothes". Grizzly Tales For Gruesome Kids. Scholastic Books. ISBN 9780233985312.
  31. ^ "Grizzly Tales for Gruesome Kids by Jamie Rix Hardback Book The Cheap Fast Free". OCLC 20523065. Retrieved 21 September 2019.
  32. ^ a b c Rix, Jamie. "jamierix-cv-march2012.pdf [Jamie Rix's CV]" (PDF). jamierix.com. Archived from the original (PDF) on 19 December 2019. Retrieved 21 September 2019.
  33. ^ "Grizzly Tales For Gruesome Kids (Puffin Books) by Jamie, Rix Paperback Book The". OCLC 27380124. Retrieved 24 September 2019.
  34. ^ "Grizzly Tales for Gruesome Kids". OCLC 45305627.
  35. ^ "Ghostly Tales for Ghastly Kids by Rix, Jamie Paperback Book The Cheap Fast Free". OCLC 26306025. Retrieved 24 September 2019.
  36. ^ "Ghostly Tales for Ghastly Kids (Hippo Fantasy), Rix, Jamie, Very Good Book". OCLC 33863505. Retrieved 24 September 2019.
  37. ^ "Fearsome Tales for Fiendish Kids: Amazon.co.uk: Jamie Rix". OCLC 43192607. Retrieved 18 December 2019.
  38. ^ a b "Fearsome Tales For Fiendish Kids by Rix, Jamie Paperback Book The Cheap Fast". Retrieved 20 September 2019. OCLC 43192607
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