Grob G180 SPn

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G180 SPn
Grob Aircraft SPn D-CSPN.jpg
Grob G180 SPn at ILA 2006
Role Corporate jet
National origin Germany
Manufacturer Grob Aerospace
First flight 20 July 2005
Introduction 2006
Status Operative
Number built 4
Grob G180 SPn at ILA 2006

The Grob G180 SPn is a low-wing twin-engined composite corporate jet projected by Grob Aerospace. It is designed to land on both paved surfaces and unimproved runway capability (grass and gravel surfaces), and is classed as "commuter class" under EASA CS 23 and FAA Part 23 regulations.

The second prototype was destroyed and the pilot killed after the aircraft crashed due to flutter in the elevators and tail-plane in 2006.[1][2] After the insolvency of Grob Aerospace in 2008, a continuation of the project was announced in 2009,[3] and revisited again in 2015, given the success of the Pilatus PC-24.[4]

In September 2010, DAHER subsidiary SOCATA announced that it would be evaluating the G180 SPn during the next few months as it considers acquiring the aircraft from Allied Aviation Technologies, which currently holds the rights to the aircraft following Grob Aerospace's 2008 insolvency.[5]

Specifications[edit]

Data from Flug-Revue[6]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1 pilot
  • Capacity: 9 passengers
  • Length: 14.81 m (48 ft 7 in)
  • Wingspan: 14.86 m (48 ft 9 in)
  • Height: 5.12 m (16 ft 9.5 in)
  • Gross weight: 6,300 kg (13,889 lb)
  • Powerplant: 2 × Williams FJ44-3A turbofans, 12.44 kN (2,800 lbf) thrust each

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 753 km/h (468 mph)
  • Maximum speed: Mach 0.70
  • Stall speed: 143 km/h (89 mph)
  • Range: 3,425 km (2,128 miles)
  • Service ceiling: 12,500 m (41,000 ft)

See also[edit]

Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era

References[edit]

  1. ^ Investigation Report (PDF) (Report). German Federal Bureau of Aircraft Accident Investigation. April 2010. 3X181-0/06. Retrieved 21 May 2010. 
  2. ^ Benenson, Tom, ed. (February 2007). "Grob SPn Crashes on Demo Flight". Airways. Flying. Vol. 134 no. 2. p. 24. ISSN 0015-4806. Retrieved 9 September 2016 – via Google Books. 
  3. ^ Sarsfield, Kate (25 March 2009). "SPn light business jet nearer to resurrection". London: Flightglobal. Retrieved 19 May 2010. 
  4. ^ Sarsfield, Kate (8 April 2015). "Grob SPn owner prepares to revive light business jet". London: Flightglobal. Retrieved 8 April 2015. 
  5. ^ Sarsfield, Kate (29 September 2010). "Daher Socata trials SPn business jet with a view to adoption". London: Flightglobal. Retrieved 29 September 2010. 
  6. ^ "Grob SPn". Flug Revue. Archived from the original on 22 September 2008. Retrieved 12 September 2008.