Dyskobolia Grodzisk Wielkopolski

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KS Dyskobolia Grodzisk Wielkopolski
Goclin.png
Full name Klub Sportowy Dyskobolia Grodzisk Wielkopolski
Nickname(s) Dyskobole (Discobolus)
Founded 30 April 1922; 95 years ago (1922-04-30)
Ground Stadion Dyskobolia,
Grodzisk Wielkopolski
Ground Capacity 6,800[1]
Chairman Ryszard Kaczmarek
Manager Andrzej Janeczek
League Liga Okręgowa, Poznań West (VI tier)

Dyskobolia Grodzisk Wielkopolski (Polish pronunciation: [dɨskɔˈbɔʎa ˈɡrɔdʑisk fʲɛlkɔˈpɔlski]) is a Polish football club based in Grodzisk Wielkopolski, Poland.

History[edit]

Dyskobolia Grodzisk Wielkopolski was founded on April 30, 1922.

After several decades in lower league football, the club was taken over in the mid-1990s by Zbigniew Drzymała, president of the Inter Groclin Auto company, and enjoyed an instant string of promotions culminating in the promotion to top level football in 1997.

Not having its own youth backbone, the club was dependent on players predominantly over 30 years of age, mostly with former league experience. After performing reasonably in the autumn period of the 1997/98 season, they experienced a sudden drop in form, which resulted in relegation. However within a year Dyskobolia was in the top flight again. Although now having many younger and more success-hungry players in the squad, the club performed disastrously in the autumn of 1999, garnering just five points from fifteen games. An unexpected (and some say suspicious) form increase in the spring resulted in eight victories in a row, which was more than enough to fight off relegation.

The club has been in the top flight ever since, enjoying second place honors on two occasions (2003 and 2005). Managers have included Dusan Radolsky, although Andrzej Janeczek is the current coach.

The first runner-up title made them eligible to play in the UEFA Cup, in which they eliminated Hertha BSC and Manchester City (with three goals in four games) before falling to Girondins Bordeaux. Their second UEFA cup run was less successful, resulting in a first round exit against RC Lens.

Merger with Polonia Warsaw[edit]

In July 2008 Dyskobolia announced its intention to merge with Polonia Warsaw[2] after the expected merger with Śląsk Wrocław[3] fell through. Polonia replaced Dyskobolia in the Ekstraklasa while the new Dyskobolia team joined the Polish Fourth League (level 5 of the Polish league pyramid).

Colours[edit]

The club colours are green and white.

Achievements[edit]

Fans[edit]

Dyskobolia, although no longer attracts as many fans as in the Second Division and Ekstraklasa years, still possesses a small but loyal group of active supporters called Szczuny z Landu.

The fans currently have two fan-clubs outside their home town, in Rakoniewice and Kąkolewo, and the fans have a strong friendship with fans of Górnik Łęczyca.

Back in the top flight they competed the Greater Poland Derby against Lech Poznań and Amica Wronki. The latter are widely considered to be their greatest rivals, a rivalry which has been renewed since the Amica's phoenix-predecessor club Błękitni Wronki has been re-established in 2007, the two frequently playing in the same division.

Notable players[edit]

Internationally capped players

Dyskobolia in Europe[edit]

Season Competition Round Club Score
2001 Intertoto Cup 1R Bulgaria PFC Spartak Varna 1-0, 0-4
2003/04 UEFA Cup Q Lithuania FK Atlantas 2-0, 4-1
1R Germany Hertha BSC Berlin 0-0, 1-0
2R England Manchester City FC 1-1, 0-0
3R France FC Girondins de Bordeaux 0-1, 1-4
2005/06 UEFA Cup 2Q Slovakia FK Dukla Banská Bystrica 4-1, 0-0
1R France RC Lens 1-1, 2-4
2007/08 UEFA Cup 1Q Azerbaijan FK MKT Araz Imisli 0-0, 1-0
2Q Kazakhstan Tobol Kostanay 1-0, 2-0
1R Serbia FK Crvena Zvezda 0-1, 0-1

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2009-08-03. Retrieved 2009-07-27. 
  2. ^ "Polonia coraz bliżej fuzji z Dyskobolią". 90minut.pl. Retrieved 2008-07-02. 
  3. ^ "Wroclaw move ends Groclin fairytale". UEFA.com. Retrieved 2008-03-04. 

External links[edit]