Groin attack

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A groin attack is a deliberate attempt to cause pain to the groin area of one's opponent. Often used in self-defense, the technique can be quickly debilitating, due to the large number of sensitive nerve endings in the penis and testicles of males, as well as the highly innervated vulva of females. A sufficiently powerful blow may fracture the pubic bone of the victim, resulting in physical disability.[1] This technique has been popularized as a comedic device in various forms of media.

In sport[edit]

An example of a low blow in professional wrestling

An attack to the groin is considered to be a "low blow" not only in the literal sense, but is the origin of the metaphor as well. In a playful attack, or attack in the framework of a sport, a low blow is seen as unfair or improper and is often considered dishonourable.

Boxing forbade strikes to the groin as far back as the Marquess of Queensberry Rules, and they are almost universally forbidden in martial arts competitions including kickboxing, and mixed martial arts.[2] UFC rules dictate a groin strike is a foul in both male and female matches, with the competitor who has received such a strike given up to five minutes to recover. However, males are required to wear groin protectors while females are prohibited from wearing groin protection.[3]

Testicle attacks were, however, allowed until the 1980s in international Thai boxing (Muay Thai) and are still permitted in Thailand itself (though the boxers wear cups to lessen the impact.)[citation needed]

Direct strikes to the groin are generally considered illegal in professional wrestling as well, and unofficial rings may consider it shameful, however, in certain "hardcore" matches the rules are relaxed and such attacks are allowed by mutual consent.[citation needed]

Self-defense[edit]

In street fighting, a low blow may be considered more appropriate as a self-defense technique. The attack can allow a much weaker combatant to temporarily disable an assailant, making it easy for them to escape. When one's opponent is at close range, a knee attack to the groin is easy to execute and difficult to defend against. It is often, though not always, effective.[4]

Effects[edit]

The testicles lack anatomical protection and are sensitive to impact, to the extent that even impact with little force can be perceived as painful. The pain caused by impact to the testicles travels through the spermatic plexus. In extreme cases, a hard strike to the testicles can cause one or both to rupture, potentially sterilizing the victim.

While less often depicted in media, a strike to the groin can be painful for a female victim. The skin of the vulva is very sensitive, making laceration injuries painful.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Anterior Pelvic Injuries – Wheeless' Textbook of Orthopaedics". Retrieved 28 October 2014.
  2. ^ "UNIFIED RULES OF MMA". ABCBoxing.com. Archived from the original on 2012-07-05. Retrieved 2011-05-19.
  3. ^ "Rules and Regulations". ufc.com. Retrieved 2018-06-06.
  4. ^ Combatives for street survival, by Kelly McCann, Black Belt Books, ISBN 978-0-89750-176-7, (2010, second edition), pp 111, 112, 139–142
  5. ^ "Female External Genital Organs". MSD Manual Consumer Version. Retrieved 2016-04-27.