Grote Prize

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George Grote Prize in Ancient History is an early career academic prize awarded for notable research in Ancient History, noted for identifying unpublished work by emerging scholars in the field.

Description[edit]

Winners have acknowledged gratitude to the prize committee in subsequent publications the prize has facilitated.[1][2][3] The prize was first awarded in 1982, and historically, winners have been announced in the German review journal, Gnomon.[4] Winners have included Professor Robin Osborne, Professor Armand D'Angour and Dr Charles Crowther.[5][6][7]

Prize fund[edit]

The cash prize of £3000 is offered for a thesis on a subject chosen by the author, and is awarded by the Institute of Classical Studies, University of London, from a fund bequeathed by Professor Victor Ehrenberg and named after historian George Grote. In the past the prize has been awarded every two to three years.[8]

The prize may nowadays be entered by members of any University of London institution who have completed no more than four years of full-time research (or the part-time equivalent). Entries are judged by the George Grote Prize Committee, comprised of teachers of ancient history within the University of London.[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fragoulaki, Maria (2013). Kinship in Thucydides: Intercommunal Ties and Historical Narrative. OUP Oxford. ISBN 9780199697779.
  2. ^ D'Angour, Armand J. "Archinus, Eucleides and the Reform of the Athenian Alphabet." Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies 43 (1999): 109-30. http://www.jstor.org/stable/43646755
  3. ^ Cartledge, Paul (1990). Nomos: Essays in Athenian Law, Politics and Society. CUP Cambridge.
  4. ^ https://www.jstor.org/stable/27688096 "George Grote Prize in Ancient History." Gnomon 54, no. 3 (1982): 320.
  5. ^ Osborne, Robin. Demos: The Discovery of Classical Attika. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. xii and 15-42.
  6. ^ D'Angour, Armand J. "Archinus, Eucleides and the Reform of the Athenian Alphabet." Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies 43 (1999): 109-30. http://www.jstor.org/stable/43646755.
  7. ^ Crowther, Charles (1995). "Iasos in the Second Century Bc III: Foreign Judges from Priene". Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies. 40: 91–138. doi:10.1111/j.2041-5370.1995.tb00467.x.
  8. ^ Williams, Lisa (1990). The Grant Register, 1991-1993. London: Macmillan. p. 342.
  9. ^ https://ics.sas.ac.uk/awards/award-prizes The Institute of Classical Studies: Awards and Prizes. Retrieved 29th April 2019.

External links[edit]