Group of Eight (Australian universities)

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Group of Eight
Logo of the Group of Eight (Australia).svg
Formation1999
TypeNonprofit organisation
HeadquartersCanberra, ACT
Location
  • Australia
Membership
University of Adelaide
Australian National University
University of Melbourne
Monash University
UNSW Sydney
University of Queensland
University of Sydney
University of Western Australia
Websitewww.go8.edu.au

The Group of Eight (Go8) comprises Australia's most research intensive universities (in alphabetical order) - the University of Adelaide, the Australian National University, the University of Melbourne, Monash University, UNSW Sydney, the University of Queensland, the University of Sydney and the University of Western Australia. It is often compared to the Russell Group of pioneering research universities in the United Kingdom.[1]

The Go8 universities are some of the largest and the oldest universities in Australia[2] and are consistently the highest ranked of all Australian universities. Six of the Go8 members are ranked in the world's top 100 universities and seven of the Go8 members are ranked in the world's top 150 universities; in the Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU), the Times Higher Education World University Rankings (THE), the QS World University Rankings (QS) and the U.S. News & World Report (US News). Go8 Universities feature in the top 50 for every broad subject area in the QS world university subject rankings. In addition, all Go8 Universities are in the QS top 100 for Engineering and Technology, Life Sciences and Medicine, Arts and Humanities, and Social Sciences and Management.

The Go8 enrols over 380,000 students; educating more than one quarter of all higher education students in Australia. The Go8 has some 31,000 research students and almost half of all research completions are from a Go8 university.

The Go8 undertakes 70 per cent of Australia's university research and their research funding from industry and other non-Government sources is twice that of the rest of the sector combined.

The Go8 receives 73 per cent of Australian Competitive Grant (Category 1) funding and had the largest proportion of research fields rated at 4 or 5 (‘above’ or ‘well above’ world standard) in the latest Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) exercise, with 99 per cent of Go8 research is world class or above. Each year the Go8 spends some $6 billion on research – more than $2 billion of which is spent on Medical and Health Services research. Go8 universities educate more than half of Australia's doctors, dentists, vets and provide some 55 per cent of Australia's science graduates and more than 40 per cent of Australia's engineering graduates.[3]

The Go8 Board, which consists of the vice-chancellors (who also serve as principals or presidents) of its eight member universities, meets five times a year. The current Chair of the Board is Margaret Gardner, Vice-Chancellor of Monash University. Vicki Thomson is the Chief Executive of the Group of Eight, taking up the role in January 2015.[4]

Members[edit]

University City Established Rankings
QS World
(2023)[5]
THE World
(2021)[6]
US News
(2021)[7]
ARWU World
(2020)[8]
Scimago
(2020)[9]
URAP
(2020)[10]
NTU
(2020)[11]
Leiden
(2020)[12][note 1]
Average
Australian National University Canberra 1946 30 59 64= 67 160 135 164 153 104
University of Melbourne Melbourne 1853 33 31 25 35 32 25 23 39 31
University of Sydney Sydney 1850 41 51= 27 74= 35 24 31 35 39
University of New South Wales Sydney 1949 45 67 51= 74= 62 42 51 48 55
University of Queensland Brisbane 1909 50= 62= 36= 54 44 35 39 31 44
Monash University Melbourne 1958 57 64= 48= 85 52 37 45 52 55
University of Western Australia Perth 1911 90 139 79 85 150 111 124 159 118
University of Adelaide Adelaide 1874 109 118= 73= 151-200 159 143 132 91 125[note 2]

Equals signs (=) denote tied rankings.

Map[edit]

Locations of each Group of Eight university main campus

Go8 law schools[edit]

Summary of schools[edit]

University Law school State / territory Est. Undergrad law intake 2019 ATAR selection threshold 2020
Australian National University College of Law Australian Capital Territory 1960 400~[13][note 3] 98[14]
University of Sydney Law School New South Wales 1855 323[15] 99.5[16]
University of Melbourne Law School Victoria 1857 300~[17][18][note 4] 99.8[19][note 5]
University of New South Wales Faculty of Law New South Wales 1971 400~[20] ATAR & Law Admission Test (LAT)[21]
University of Queensland Law School Queensland 1936 203[22] 98[23]
Monash University Faculty of Law Victoria 1963 457[24] 98[25]
University of Adelaide Law School South Australia 1883 288[26] 95[27]
University of Western Australia Law School Western Australia 1927

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ measured by the impact indicator P(top 1%), ordered by P(top 1%) using fractional counting.
  2. ^ 151-200 averaged to 175.5 for the purposes of the combined average
  3. ^ rough estimate due to nonspecific number of 2019 student intake
  4. ^ Rough estimate from 2016
  5. ^ 99.8 for guaranteed CSP entry/99.0 for guaranteed FP or a 75 per cent WAM in an undergraduate degree from the University of Melbourne

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Group of Eight benefits for economy 'bigger than Russell Group's'" (PDF). Group of Eight. Retrieved 27 December 2020.[permanent dead link]
  2. ^ Neumann, R. (2002). "Diversity, doctoral education and policy". Higher Education Research & Development. 21 (2): 167–178. doi:10.1080/07294360220144088. S2CID 143032290.
  3. ^ "About the Go8". Group of Eight Australia. 4 December 2021.
  4. ^ "The Go8 Team". Group of Eight Australia. 26 July 2017.
  5. ^ "QS World University Rankings 2023". Retrieved 8 June 2022.
  6. ^ "World University Rankings 2021". Times Higher Education. Retrieved 16 January 2020.
  7. ^ "Top World University Rankings | US News Best Global Universities". www.usnews.com. Retrieved 16 January 2020.
  8. ^ "Academic Ranking of World Universities 2020". Shanghai Ranking Consultancy. Archived from the original on 15 August 2019. Retrieved 17 August 2020.
  9. ^ "Scimago Institutions Rankings". www.scimagoir.com. Retrieved 16 June 2020.
  10. ^ "URAP 2020-2021 | World Ranking 2020-2021". urapcenter.org. Retrieved 4 December 2021.
  11. ^ "By Country". nturanking.csti.tw. Retrieved 20 October 2020.
  12. ^ Studies (CWTS), Centre for Science and Technology. "CWTS Leiden Ranking". CWTS Leiden Ranking. Retrieved 20 October 2020.
  13. ^ "ANU Law at a Glance 2018" (PDF).
  14. ^ "Bachelor of Laws (Honours) - ANU". programsandcourses.anu.edu.au. Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  15. ^ "Student and ATAR admission profiles". The University of Sydney. Retrieved 22 February 2020.
  16. ^ "Student and ATAR admission profiles". The University of Sydney. Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  17. ^ "Beginning of a legal education: Orientation at Melbourne Law School". 16 January 2018.
  18. ^ "The Best 11 Law Schools in the World (2021) - Crimson Education AU".
  19. ^ "Juris Doctor - the University of Melbourne".
  20. ^ "Admission to UNSW - Future Students - UNSW Sydney". www.futurestudents.unsw.edu.au. Retrieved 21 December 2020.
  21. ^ "Arts/Law". UNSW Degree Finder. Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  22. ^ "Go further with UQ law - School of Law - University of Queensland". law.uq.edu.au. Retrieved 21 December 2020.
  23. ^ "Bachelor of Laws (Honours) - Future Students - University of Queensland". future-students.uq.edu.au. Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  24. ^ "Student profile". Study at Monash University. Retrieved 22 February 2020.
  25. ^ "Laws - L3001". Study at Monash University. Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  26. ^ "Search Results | Degree Finder". www.adelaide.edu.au. Retrieved 22 February 2020.
  27. ^ "Bachelor of Laws | Degree Finder". www.adelaide.edu.au. Retrieved 5 March 2020.

External links[edit]