Grove City College v. Bell

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Grove City College v. Bell
Seal of the United States Supreme Court.svg
Argued November 29, 1983
Decided February 28, 1984
Full case nameGrove City College, et al.
v.
Terrel Bell, Secretary of Education
Citations465 U.S. 555 (more)
104 S. Ct. 1211; 79 L. Ed. 2d 516; 1984 U.S. LEXIS 158
Prior history687 F.2d 684 (3d Cir. 1982)
Holding
Title IX, which applies only to educational institutions that receive federal funds, could be applied to a private school that refused direct federal funding but for which a large number of students had received federally-funded scholarships.
Court membership
Chief Justice
Warren E. Burger
Associate Justices
William J. Brennan Jr. · Byron White
Thurgood Marshall · Harry Blackmun
Lewis F. Powell Jr. · William Rehnquist
John P. Stevens · Sandra Day O'Connor
Case opinions
MajorityWhite, joined by Burger, Blackmun, Powell, Rehnquist, O'Connor
ConcurrenceStevens
ConcurrenceBrennan, joined by Marshall
Abrogated by
Civil Rights Restoration Act of 1987, Pub. L. No. 100-259, 102 Stat. 28 (1988)

Grove City College v. Bell, 465 U.S. 555 (1984), was a case in which the United States Supreme Court held that Title IX, which applies only to colleges and universities that receive federal funds, could be applied to a private school that refused direct federal funding but for which a large number of students had received federally funded scholarships. The Court also held that the federal government could require a statutorily mandated "assurance of compliance" with Title IX even though no evidence had been presented to suggest that Grove City College had discriminated. However, the Court also held that the regulation would apply only to the institution's financial aid department, not to the school as a whole.

Justice White delivered the opinion of the Court, which was unanimous except for Part III.

Overturning of decision[edit]

The decision by the Supreme Court was effectively overturned when the United States Congress subsequently passed the Civil Rights Restoration Act of 1987, which specified that recipients of federal funds must comply with civil rights laws in all areas, not just in the particular program or activity that received federal funding.

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Marks, Brian Andrew (1996). A Model of Judicial Influence on Congressional Policymaking: Grove City College v. Bell. Ann Arbor: UMI. OCLC 59620765.
  • Pittsburgh Press analysis

External links[edit]