Guaiene

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Guaienes
Alpha-guaiene.svg
α-Guaiene
Beta-guaiene.svg
β-Guaiene
Delta-guaiene.svg
δ-Guaiene
Names
IUPAC names
α: (1S,4S,7R)-1,4-Dimethyl-7-(prop-1-en-2-yl)-1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8-octahydroazulene
β: (1S,4S)-1,4-Dimethyl-7-(propan-2-ylidene)-1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8-octahydroazulene
δ: (3S,3aS,5R)-3,8-Dimethyl-5-(prop-1-en-2-yl)-1,2,3,3a,4,5,6,7-octahydroazulene
Other names
Guajene
Identifiers
3D model (Jmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.169.245
UNII
Properties
C15H24
Molar mass 204.36 g·mol−1
Boiling point α: 281-282 °C[1]
α: 78-79 °C (@ 2.5 Torr)[2]
β: 281 °C[3]
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Guaienes are a series of closely related natural chemical compounds that have been isolated from a variety of plant sources. The guaienes are sesquiterpenes with the molecular formula C15H24. α-Guaiene is the most common and was first isolated from guaiac wood oil from Bulnesia sarmientoi.[4] The guaienes are used in the fragrance and flavoring industries to impart earthy, spicy aromas and tastes.[1][5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Alpha-guaiene, The Good Scents Company
  2. ^ Takeda, Kenichi (1961). "Studies on sesquiterpenoids—III, Some derivatives of guaiol". Tetrahedron. 13 (4): 308–318. doi:10.1016/S0040-4020(01)92224-0. 
  3. ^ Won, Mi-Mi (2009). "Analytica Chimica Acta". 631 (1): 54–61. 
  4. ^ Bates, R. B.; Slagel, R. C. (1962). "Terpenoids. VI. β-Bulnesene, α-guaiene, β-patchoulene, and guaioxide in essential oils". Chemistry & Industry: 1715–1716. 
  5. ^ Guaiene, Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives