Guatemalan constitutional referendum, 1999

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A constitutional referendum was held in Guatemala on 16 May 1999.[1] It featured four questions; one on defining the nation and social rights (including those of the indigenous population, workers, military service and an expansion of the social security system) one on reforming Congress, one on reforming the executive (including redefining the role of the military) and one on reforming the judiciary.[2] All four were rejected by voters, although turnout was just 18.6%.[2]

Results[edit]

Definition of the nation and social rights[edit]

Choice Votes %
For 327,854 43.2
Against 366,591 48.3
Invalid/blank votes -
Total 757,940 100
Source: Nohlen

Reform of Congress[edit]

Choice Votes %
For 284,423 42.0
Against 392,223 58.0
Invalid/blank votes -
Total 757,940 100
Source: Nohlen

Reform of the Executive[edit]

Choice Votes %
For 294,849 42.9
Against 392,223 57.1
Invalid/blank votes -
Total 757,940 100
Source: Nohlen

Reform of the Judiciary[edit]

Choice Votes %
For 315,565 45.8
Against 373,025 54.2
Invalid/blank votes -
Total 757,940 100
Source: Nohlen

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nohlen, D (2005) Elections in the Americas: A data handbook, Volume I, p323 ISBN 978-0-19-928357-6
  2. ^ a b Nohlen, pp330-331