Guchuan Bridge

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Coordinates: 22°44′52.0″N 120°42′16.9″E / 22.747778°N 120.704694°E / 22.747778; 120.704694

Guchuan Bridge

谷川大橋
WutaiGuchuanBridgeWesternView20150507.jpg
Coordinates 22°44′52″N 120°42′18″E / 22.7477°N 120.7051°E / 22.7477; 120.7051Coordinates: 22°44′52″N 120°42′18″E / 22.7477°N 120.7051°E / 22.7477; 120.7051
LocaleSandimen and Wutai in Pingtung County, Taiwan
Preceded byWutai No. 1 Bridge
Characteristics
DesignBridge
MaterialConcrete
Trough constructionSteel
Total length654 meters
Width10 meters
Piers in water1
History
Construction start2009
Construction end2013
Construction costNT$700 million
Opened5 October 2013

The Guchuan Bridge (Chinese: 谷川大橋; pinyin: Gǔchuān Dàqiáo) is a bridge connecting Sandimen Township and Wutai Township in Pingtung County, Taiwan. At the height of 99 meters, it is the tallest bridge pier in Taiwan.

History[edit]

The bridge was opened for traffic on 5 October 2013 after four years of construction with a total cost of NT$700 million. The bridge was built to replace the original bridge named Wutai No. 1 Bridge which was destroyed by Typhoon Morakot in August 2009.[1]

Technical specification[edit]

The bridge has a length of 654 meters and width of 10 meters, and is made of concrete and steel. It crosses over the North Ailiao River. To avoid damage by flash flood along the river during typhoon season, there is only one pier built in the path of continuous river flow.[2]

Economy[edit]

The bridge plays a significant role in the economic activity of Wutai Township which is located in an isolated mountain region in southern Taiwan. Tourists have been coming to the township through the bridge which led to the opening of several new hotels.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Chiu Chih-jou; Pan, Jason (7 Oct 2013). "Bridge to Wutai opens to traffic". Taipei Times. p. 3. Retrieved 25 Nov 2016.
  2. ^ "Guchuan Bridge unlocks Rukai tourism potential". Taiwan Today. 5 June 2014. Retrieved 25 November 2016.
  3. ^ "Guchuan Bridge unlocks Rukai tourism potential". Taiwan heute. 6 May 2014. Retrieved 28 November 2016.