Gull Lake, Saskatchewan

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Gull Lake
Town
Town of Gull Lake
Buildings on Main Street, Gull Lake
Buildings on Main Street, Gull Lake
Gull Lake is located in Saskatchewan
Gull Lake
Gull Lake
Gull Lake is located in Gull Lake No. 139
Gull Lake
Gull Lake
Coordinates: 50°05′49″N 108°29′05″W / 50.09694°N 108.48472°W / 50.09694; -108.48472[1]Coordinates: 50°05′49″N 108°29′05″W / 50.09694°N 108.48472°W / 50.09694; -108.48472[1]
CountryCanada
ProvinceSaskatchewan
Census division8
Rural MunicipalityGull Lake
Post office Founded1884
Incorporated (Village)1909
Incorporated (Town)1911
Government
 • MayorLance Allen
 • Governing bodyGull Lake Town Council
 • MPJeremy Patzer
 • MLADoug Steele
Area
 • Total2.50 km2 (0.97 sq mi)
Population
 (2006)
 • Total965
 • Density386.0/km2 (1,000/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC−06:00 (CST)
Postal code
S0N 1A0
Area code(s)306
HighwaysHighway 1
Highway 37
WebsiteOfficial website
[2][3][4][5]

Gull Lake is a small town in Saskatchewan, Canada, situated on the junction of the Trans-Canada Highway and Highway 37, west of Swift Current. Some people identify the town by the wind turbines that can be seen in the distance while driving along the Trans-Canada Highway. The SunBridge Wind Farm is near Gull Lake.

History[edit]

Main street in Gull Lake

The history of the Gull Lake community dates back to 1906, when a development company Conrad and Price acquired and surveyed the town site and subdivided it into blocks. Unlike most other towns located along the Canadian Pacific Railway main line, Gull Lake was not planned and established by the railroad. In fact, there was some animosity from the railroad towards this town that bucked their plan. The origin of the name Gull Lake comes from the Cree word for the area, Kiaskus (kiyaskos) which means "little gull".[6]

From 1906 to 1909 there was no municipal government or authority other than Conrad and Price: the company had full jurisdiction over civic affairs. In 1909 the citizens of Gull Lake had their community incorporated as a village.[7]

Before 1906 the town of Gull Lake was part of the famed Ranch 76 that stretched over most of southwestern Saskatchewan. There are still a few buildings in the town that were part of the ranch.

Demographics[edit]

In the 2021 Census of Population conducted by Statistics Canada, Gull Lake had a population of 908 living in 407 of its 494 total private dwellings, a change of -13.2% from its 2016 population of 1,046. With a land area of 2.4 km2 (0.93 sq mi), it had a population density of 378.3/km2 (979.9/sq mi) in 2021.[8]

Canada census – Gull Lake community profile
20212011
Population908 (-13.2% from 2016)989 (+2.5% from 2006)
Land area2.40 km2 (0.93 sq mi)2.50 km2 (0.97 sq mi)
Population density378.5/km2 (980/sq mi)395.6/km2 (1,025/sq mi)
Median age43.2 (M: 42, F: 44)48.3 (M: 46.8, F: 49.6)
Total private dwellings405475
Median household income
References: 2021[9] 2011[10] earlier[11][12]

Climate[edit]

Gull Lake Experiences a Humid Continental climate (Dfb) with warm summers and long, cold winters.

Climate data for Gull Lake
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 14
(57)
15
(59)
20.6
(69.1)
30
(86)
38
(100)
39
(102)
37
(99)
40
(104)
37.8
(100.0)
29
(84)
21.5
(70.7)
14.4
(57.9)
40
(104)
Average high °C (°F) −6.1
(21.0)
−3.4
(25.9)
2.6
(36.7)
11.4
(52.5)
17.8
(64.0)
22.4
(72.3)
25.4
(77.7)
25
(77)
18.2
(64.8)
11.8
(53.2)
1.5
(34.7)
−4.7
(23.5)
10.2
(50.4)
Daily mean °C (°F) −11.5
(11.3)
−8.6
(16.5)
−2.9
(26.8)
4.6
(40.3)
10.6
(51.1)
15.1
(59.2)
17.6
(63.7)
17
(63)
10.8
(51.4)
4.9
(40.8)
−4
(25)
−10.1
(13.8)
3.6
(38.5)
Average low °C (°F) −16.8
(1.8)
−13.8
(7.2)
−8.5
(16.7)
−2.2
(28.0)
3.5
(38.3)
7.8
(46.0)
9.8
(49.6)
8.9
(48.0)
3.4
(38.1)
−1.9
(28.6)
−9.4
(15.1)
−15.4
(4.3)
−2.9
(26.8)
Record low °C (°F) −40.6
(−41.1)
−42.8
(−45.0)
−36.1
(−33.0)
−26.1
(−15.0)
−9
(16)
−5.6
(21.9)
0
(32)
−1.5
(29.3)
−10.6
(12.9)
−25.5
(−13.9)
−33.5
(−28.3)
−41.5
(−42.7)
−42.8
(−45.0)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 18.1
(0.71)
13.7
(0.54)
22.3
(0.88)
26.5
(1.04)
64.9
(2.56)
64.6
(2.54)
52.9
(2.08)
41.3
(1.63)
35.9
(1.41)
15.7
(0.62)
12.4
(0.49)
19.6
(0.77)
387.9
(15.27)
Source: Environment Canada[13]

Economy[edit]

Agriculture is the top employment field with many surrounding farms and ranches, with some work in the oil fields as well.

Attractions[edit]

Regional Attractions:

Great Sandhills Museum in Sceptre
  • Big Muddy Badlands, a series of badlands in southern Saskatchewan and northern Montana along Big Muddy Creek. They are found in the Big Muddy Valley, a cleft of erosion and sandstone along Big Muddy Creek. The valley is 55 kilometres (34 mi) long, 3.2 kilometres (2.0 mi) wide and 160 metres (520 ft) deep.[14] The valley was formed when it was part of an ancient glacial meltwater channel that carried great quantities of water southeastward during the last ice age.[15]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Gull Lake". Geographical Names Data Base. Natural Resources Canada.
  2. ^ National Archives, Archivia Net, Post Offices and Postmasters
  3. ^ Government of Saskatchewan, MRD Home, Municipal Directory System, archived from the original on November 21, 2008
  4. ^ Canadian Textiles Institute. (2005), CTI Determine your provincial constituency, archived from the original on 2007-09-11
  5. ^ Commissioner of Canada Elections, Chief Electoral Officer of Canada (2005), Elections Canada On-line, archived from the original on 2007-04-21
  6. ^ Barry, Bill (October 1, 1998), The Dictionary of Saskatchewan Place Names, Betty K Books & Food, ISBN 978-1-894022-19-4
  7. ^ Town of Gull Lake History Committee. (1989). Gull Lake memories: a history of the town of Gull Lake. Regina: Focus, p37.
  8. ^ "Population and dwelling counts: Canada, provinces and territories, census divisions and census subdivisions (municipalities), Saskatchewan". Statistics Canada. February 9, 2022. Retrieved April 1, 2022.
  9. ^ "2021 Community Profiles". 2021 Canadian Census. Statistics Canada. February 4, 2022. Retrieved 2022-04-27.
  10. ^ "2011 Community Profiles". 2011 Canadian Census. Statistics Canada. March 21, 2019. Retrieved 2012-10-30.
  11. ^ "2006 Community Profiles". 2006 Canadian Census. Statistics Canada. August 20, 2019.
  12. ^ "2001 Community Profiles". 2001 Canadian Census. Statistics Canada. July 18, 2021.
  13. ^ Environment Canada Canadian Climate Normals 1971–2000, accessed 27 July 2010
  14. ^ Yanko, Dave. "The Badlands". Virtual Saskatchewan. Retrieved 2010-05-11.
  15. ^ Harel, Claude-Jean (2006). "Big Muddy Valley". Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan. Great Plains Research Center. Archived from the original on 2009-06-19. Retrieved 2010-05-11.
  16. ^ Cypress Hills Vineyard & Winery
  17. ^ Great Sandhills Archived 2011-08-27 at the Wayback Machine
  18. ^ Robsart Art Works Archived 2013-06-20 at the Wayback Machine

External links[edit]