Gunfighters of the Northwest

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Gunfighters of the Northwest
Gunfighters of the Northwest FilmPoster.jpeg
Directed by Spencer Gordon Bennet
Charles S. Gould
Produced by Sam Katzman
Written by Royal K. Cole
Arthur Hoerl
George H. Plympton
Starring Jock Mahoney
Clayton Moore
Phyllis Coates
Don C. Harvey
Marshall Reed
Rodd Redwing
Lyle Talbot
Music by Mischa Bakaleinikoff
Cinematography William Whitley - B&W
Edited by Earl Turner
Distributed by Columbia Pictures
Release date
  • April 15, 1954 (1954-04-15)
Running time
15 Episodes, 97 minutes
Country United States
Language English

Gunfighters of the Northwest (1954) was the 53rd serial released by Columbia Pictures. It was entirely filmed on location at Big Bear Lake, California, USA, and not a single scene was filmed in indoors setting.

Plot[edit]

White Horse Rebels, under the command of a mystery villain known only as The Leader, attempt to create an independent "White Horse Republic" in Canada's north west. Funded by gold from the Marrow Mine, they attack Canadian settlements in the area. The North-West Mounted Police, represented primarily by hero Sgt. Ward and his sidekick Constable Nevin are, work to top the rebels and discover The Leader's real identity. An added complication comes in the form of First Nations, Blackfeet driven into Canada from the United States, who attack both sides and whom the rebels attempt to use as scapegoats for their own attacks.

Production[edit]

The entire filming of Gunfighters of the Northwest took place outdoors at Big Bear Lake, California. Even a scene set in a cave was filmed outside with director Spencer Gordon Bennet setting up the lighting and a back grop to make it appear to be an internal shot.[1] During filming, the whole cast and crew all lived at a nearby hotel.[1]

The two heroic leads, Jock Mahoney and Clayton Moore, were injured during production. On the second day of shooting, Moore's horse backed and threw him. He landed on his back and was knocked unconscious. An assistant director took him to a doctor in Big Bear, who said he would be "laid up for a little while", after which Moore visited a chiropractor in town, who was able to help him. He was not able to perform any rising scenes for a few days but could act in all the dramatic scenes with no problems.[1] Mahoney was hurt on the same day, injuring a metatarsal in a fight scene, but he was able to walk and continue filming the next day.[1]

Moore had been the Lone Ranger in the television series until being replaced by John Hart in 1952. Hart was at that time dating female lead Phyllis Coates and visited the set. When Moore was injured, the production needed a double to stand in for him in a riding scene and Hart volunteered. Hart ended up doubling for Moore in several scenes in the serial.[1]

Cast[edit]

Chapter titles[edit]

  1. A Trap for the Mounties
  2. Indian War Drums
  3. Between Two Fires
  4. Midnight Raiders
  5. Running the Gauntlet
  6. Mounties at Bay
  7. Plunge of Peril
  8. Killer at Large
  9. The Fighting Mounties
  10. The Sergeant Gets His Man
  11. The Fugitive Escapes
  12. Stolen Gold
  13. Perils of the Mounted Police
  14. Surprise Attack
  15. Trail's End

Source:[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Moore, Clayton (1998). I Was That Masked Man. Taylor Trade Publishing. pp. 138–140. ISBN 9781461625155. 
  2. ^ Cline, William C. (1984). "Filmography". In the Nick of Time. McFarland & Company, Inc. pp. 254–255. ISBN 0-7864-0471-X. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
The Great Adventures of Captain Kidd (1953)
Columbia Serial
Gunfighters of the Northwest (1954)
Succeeded by
Riding with Buffalo Bill (1954)