Gunhild Carling

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Gunhild Carling
Carling in 2009
Carling in 2009
Background information
Born (1975-05-07) 7 May 1975 (age 45)
Gothenburg, Sweden
GenresJazz
Instruments
Associated acts

Gunhild Carling (born 7 May 1975) is a Swedish jazz musician and multi-instrumentalist.[1] She is famous for playing three trumpets at the same time.[2]

Career[edit]

Carling became known for her performance at Allsång på Skansen on 20 July 2010. The same year, she became an expert commentator for Dansbandskampen at SVT. Gunhild plays trombone, bagpipes, trumpet, recorder, string instruments (such as banjo, ukulele and harp), and will often showcase all of her skills in one song, sometimes casually breaking into a tap dance or singing. [3] Carling competed as a celebrity dancer in Let's Dance 2014 on TV4, placing third.[3][4]

In 2013, she performed with her 'Carling Big Band' at the Royal Palace in Stockholm in the celebration of King Carl XVI Gustaf's Ruby Jubilee.[5] In 2016, Carling performed at King Carl XVI Gustaf's 70th birthday celebration.[6]

She was featured as a singer and multi-instrumentalist in several of Scott Bradlee's Postmodern Jukebox's adaptations of pop songs, which include a jazz swing version of Rick Astley's "Never Going to Give You Up", a 1920s jazz swing version of "Material Girl", a vintage jazz version of Europe's "The Final Countdown", a jazz cover of Pharrel Williams' "Happy", and a 1920s hot jazz cover of ABBA's "Dancing Queen".

In 2016, she was featured at TEDxArendal, speaking about and playing trombone, which she has said is her favorite instrument.[7] Carling often expresses her affection and respect for artists from early jazz, and especially the seminal New Orleans period. Among others, she refers to the influences of Louis Armstrong, Freddie Keppard, Jelly Roll Morton, Bix Beiderbecke, and Billie Holiday. Holiday's influence is patent in Carling's singing style.

In 2003, Carling married Johan Blomé, who does photography and video production and also plays multiple instruments.[8] She often performs with their children, daughter Idun Blomé and son Viggo Blomé.[9] Beginning as a child, she has also performed many times with her siblings, sister Gerd and brothers Max and Ulf.[10] They initially played with their musical parents Aina and Hans Carling, and the former continues to be a frequent member of her music troupe.[11] In 2016, the "wonder woman of Jazz" explained the development of her talents and career:

"I haven’t ever been to a music teacher. I come from a family that plays music. I grew up in the south of Sweden, outside of Malmo. Our house was full of variety – circus, acting, dance, vaudeville and novelty. I just picked up instruments from when I was very young and played them. I started with the drums, then the recorder, trombone and trumpet. Then I started tap dancing, and after that harmonica and bagpipe. Later, I began composing music."[12]

Carling does much of the artwork for her promotional materials.

In 2018, Carling moved to northern California with her family. She had performances scheduled throughout the United States, but with venues closing due to the COVID-19 pandemic, she often performs live via online social media.[13]

Several Carling videos have exceeded one million views. Her recorded albums are available as commercial CDs and digital downloads and on streaming services.

Discography[edit]

Albums[edit]

  • I Lost My Heart in Dixieland, The Carling Family Hot Five (1985)
  • The Carling Family Hot Six, The Carling Family Hot Six (1987)
  • That's My Desire, Gunhild Carling and her Swing Band (2002)
  • 20th Jubilee, Carling Family (2004)
Banjo, Guitar, Aina Carling; Clarinet, Tenor Saxophone, Violin, Max Carling; Drums, Ulf Carling; Piano, Trombone, Alto Saxophone, Gerd Carling; Trombone, Trumpet, Recorder, Vocals, Harmonica, Gunhild Carling; Trumpet, Piano, Hans Carling
  • Magic Swing!, Gunhild Carling and the Carling Big Band (2007)
  • Hot Jazz, Carling Family (2009)
Banjo, Guitar, Aina Carling; Clarinet, Tenor Saxophone, Violin, Max Carling; Contrabass – Tomas Carling; Drums, Ulf Carling; Piano, Trombone, Alto Saxophone, Gerd Carling; Trombone, Trumpet, Recorder, Vocals, Harmonica, Gunhild Carling; Trumpet, Piano, Hans Carling
  • Varieté, Gunhild Carling and the Carling Big Band (2014)
  • Red Hot Jam, Gunhild Carling (2014)
  • Swing Out, Gunhild Carling and the Carling Big Band (2014)
  • Big Apple, Gunhild Carling and the Carling Big Band (2015)
  • Harlem Joy, Gunhild Carling and the Carling Big Band (2015)

Singles & EPs[edit]

  • Baby It's Cold Outside, Christer Sjögren, Pernilla Wahlgren & Gunhild Carling (2011)
  • Winter's Day, Gunhild Carling (2011)

Awards[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Gunhild Carling till Norrtälje i februari". Norrtelje Tidning. Archived from the original on 2 May 2014. Retrieved 1 May 2014.
  2. ^ "Jazz Trumpeter Gunhild Carling on AGT Plays 3 Trumpets at Once". 2paragraphs.com. Archived from the original on 11 February 2017. Retrieved 8 February 2017.
  3. ^ a b "Lär känna Gunhild Carling". TV4.se. Archived from the original on 28 March 2014. Retrieved 1 May 2014.
  4. ^ "Gunhild Carling: Räddad av TV4:s miss". Aftonbladet. Archived from the original on 28 April 2014. Retrieved 1 May 2014.
  5. ^ "Kungen firade med dans – Får Jag Lov". fjl.se (in Swedish). Archived from the original on 11 February 2017. Retrieved 9 February 2017.
  6. ^ "Kunglig musikfest inför 70-årsdagen". 29 April 2016. Archived from the original on 11 February 2017. Retrieved 9 February 2017.
  7. ^ "Jazz trombone | Gunhild Carling | TEDxArendal". TEDx Talks. Archived from the original on 4 April 2020. Retrieved 30 March 2020.
  8. ^ "Gunhild Carling and Her Swing Band" (PDF). catt.se. Archived (PDF) from the original on 13 August 2010. Retrieved 29 March 2020.
  9. ^ "Carling Family". Carling Family. Archived from the original on 3 November 2019. Retrieved 29 March 2020.
  10. ^ "Carling Family at Metropol Hörby". behance.net. Retrieved 29 March 2020.
  11. ^ "Blues (My Naughty Sweetie Gives to Me)". 20sjazz.com. Archived from the original on 29 March 2020. Retrieved 29 March 2020.
  12. ^ Ori J. Lenkinski (17 November 2016). "The Swedish 'wonder woman' of jazz". The Jerusalem Post. Archived from the original on 29 March 2020. Retrieved 29 March 2020.
  13. ^ "Gunhild Carling". Gunhiild Carling. Archived from the original on 29 March 2020. Retrieved 29 March 2020.
  14. ^ "DIG Jazz". www.digjazz.se. Archived from the original on 13 April 2017. Retrieved 8 February 2017.
  15. ^ "Cookies op Trouw.nl". www.trouw.nl (in Dutch). Archived from the original on 11 February 2017. Retrieved 8 February 2017.
  16. ^ "Malmö Stads Glädjespridare". mikosallskapet.se. Archived from the original on 11 February 2017. Retrieved 8 February 2017.
  17. ^ Musikerförbundet. "Gunhild Carling får årets Thore Ehrling-stipendium". Fackförbundet för dig som jobbar med musik. Vi arbetar för att förbättra våra medlemmars upphovs- och arbetsrättsliga villkor. (in Swedish). Archived from the original on 11 February 2017. Retrieved 8 February 2017.

External links[edit]